Growth Marketing Camp
Growth Marketing Camp

Episode 47 · 8 months ago

Catherine Dummitt’s Extremely Bold and Shockingly Witty Pinata Campaign That Caught Unicorn’s Attention

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If you're an adult in the US, you most likely have engaged with Narvar. With the goal of simplifying consumers' everyday lives by driving customer loyalty through seamless post-purchase experiences, they’ve touched more than 80% of adults in the states.

In this episode of Growth Marketing Camp, we are delighted to have Catherine Dummitt, VP of Marketing at Narvar, join us. Kicking off her career as an SDR, her journey is not typical, which makes her a marketing leader with a unique point of view. Catherine tells the story of how she launched one of the most fun and original campaigns we’ve heard in a while, and breaks down the steps her team took to make it successful. She also shares her take on how to break into a noisy space and stand out.

Trust us, you won’t want to miss this one, so be sure to tune in.

Welcome to growth marketing camp, or we sit down with our favorite marketers to do mystify growth and give you the insights to help turn your next campaign into a major success. Let's get into it, all right, everybody, this is bobby and the Raying, host of growth marketing camp. I am Incredib excited today to be joined by Catherine Darmot. She is BP of marketing at Narvar. Catherine, welcome to the show, are you. Thank you for having me today. Absolutely super excited to have you on. Before we get into it, love to just start by maybe just getting a little bit of background on yourself and your curve company on Harvar. Yeah, of course. So, like you said, I'm the VP of marketing here at Marvar. I oversee global marketing, so that is inclusive field marketing, demand generation, content, comms, PR product marketing and so much more. It really is a blast. I get to work alongside some of the most brilliant folks I ever have had the privilege of working wet and yeah, I'm based out of New York overseeing this global team. Absolutely cool. So you've been with NORV OAR and napper around a your so is that about rout seven months. So thought looks okay. Okay, so you're still still relatively you in the job. I'm kind of curious and actually, before we get into it, you might just maybe giving our audience a little bit of an understanding of what it is that Marvar provides in the market. Yeah, absolut solutely so. If you are an adult in the US, you most likely have engaged with Narva. I think the latest down as we've touched eighty percent of adults in the states. So what we are is a post for justis platform, meaning we help brands like Nike and Lulu Lemons, the fora gap, engage customers beyond the buy button. So it's you're online shopping for the latest pair of Lu Lemon Aligne leggings, we're right there next to them helping them facilitate that post purchase experience, everything from branded tracking pages to messaging alerting you of where your packages to that actual delivery, as well as the returns piece of it all. So it's really fine and we play in the e commerce space. They think black. Couple of years everyone has started doing more and more online shopping. So I am sure now that you've heard the NARV Our name you'll start seeing it everywhere. It's funny. I mentioned that as soon as I saw that our conversation was on the calendar, I noticed an our bar tracking page after purchasing a pair of new doleances for weeks ago. So makes it makes a ton of sense. Yeah, I I think when I first was interviewing for the role, the recruited reach other like Narva and I was like wait a second, let me get for now. Yeah, kept seeing I saw like hundreds from rent the run way and I was opening like a bunch of other companies and I was like, okay, so this one is is the the company that's enabling my shopping addiction? Great. So absolutely, there you go. Well, at least you get something in return now. Absolutely really...

...interesting. So I think what's kind of really timely and relevant about this conversation. You know, it's funny because growth marketing camp started about a year and a half ago and we're very much in the thicker pandemic at that point and I'm sure what it's like New York City, San Francisco. I think it's been a little bit of a Lagger, but we're really starting to come out of what's felt like the last couple of years, this this pandemic. Obviously, during that though, I think e commerce was a segment of the market that was just getting busters and just wondering like what was that like? And I know that probably predates you a little bit, but I'm sure you're probably heard, but maybe do you might just maybe sharing sort of like what the last couple of years have been like for Narvar, just based on what you've heard, and then maybe like what you're what you're observed of it less several months as we've kind of sort of climbing your way out of pandemic, like what kind of impact has that had on on Narvar and what is the market look like today? So, yeah, I haven't been at the company for for that long, but I was in marketing technology and so I did get to see how dramatically the e commerce landscape did change over the course pandemic. I think back to March two thousand and twenty, where we had these traditional brick and mortar retailers, Yep, forking out because they had to close their shops and it's like well, how are they going to support the business? Where is the revenue going to come from? And so ultimately a lot of these folks had to start investing in online channels and, yeah, they were pretty far behind. So digital transformation had to happen unprecedented raids. I think they said in two thousand and twenty. It like equated to six to seven years of transformation for or some of these dealers, which was is just wild. Yeah, and so ultimately, you know, nerver was position for success because we exclusively work with retailers who have a digital presence. That's our bread and butter. Okay, so many folks were wanting to come online and, you know, get money in the door. They desperately needed it. They need be and their business. But the reason why a lot of these folks hadn't, you know, joined necessarily the ECOMMERCE space or really had invested, is because of that experience element. Like I think about, and I'll throw out Farragama. Like sure, qualk into the Salvator Fair Gama store on Fifth Avenue and needs to a beautiful experience. You know, I'm greeted by someone and they walk me through the store and as I'm checking out there's like a beautiful handwritten card, like maybe I'll get one two weeks in the mail. Like. It is just an exquisite experience and a lot of retailers, especially in the luxury category, like had it necessarily invested too much in the digital space, because the experiences what they value most, that's what their customer spoting is. And where we were really positioned for success was that we're able to enable brands to deliver some of these experiencess beyond what they ever thought digitally possible,...

...and so as a result, there was a really nice uptick in business and that has sustained over the last couple of years. We are in year over year. You know, it's our biggest year yet, and then the next year it's like our big and it really exciting to be a part of a company that can that can grow and can enable businesses that do want to move into the twenty one century but then also meet their customers where they are. So, just like brands having to find new revenue channels, I think about consumers like we were all scared. We didn't know what was going on, we were quarantined at home, we couldn't go out in shops. So you know what traditionally could have been unfamiliar to us? Maybe buying groceries online or clothing force change behavior, and so nerve is essentially enabling all these brands to now help them meet their customers where they are on any school. Absolutely I'm really curious about that last thing that you mentioned our I think it's a great summary and enables brands to meet their customers where they are. I'm wondering, like, when you think about your job, is it such that there are brands that have traditionally had that kind of that ecommerce experience right, that the ones who already had that motion built, and that's a very attractive target market, and making sure that they're aware of norvel are and understand its value proposition is certainly going to be a part of the problem or the work that you're doing. But do you also look at perhaps those businesses that that still needed those six to seven years to get digitally acclimated as a part of an audience that maybe need education on on or resources that potentially become a part of your dress of market? I'm just wondering, do you viewed, think of the market that way, of like you're sort of like ready to rule digitally savay brands and those that perhaps are the next up and and still need to experience that transformation. Just kind of curious if that's a part of the problem that you're solving right now. I think two years ago, yes, that would have been the case, but there has been so much catch up. Got It. I think when we're thinking about the market today, where there's a lot of opportunity, because I'll take a step back. Sure, a lot of these brick and mortar retailers who came online, they were there big giants, right, Yep, and so they had the resources to be able to transform and and meet some of these digitally native brands. Yeah, how where they were? I would say, looking at the actual ecommerce ecosystem and I think about shop of I. Yeah, like if we talked about if we had this conversation five years ago, like what we have been talking about shop of I. But the've exploded in the last two year, really enabling SANB's to get online and have the resources to build their businesses. And so I think the real opportunity today for companies like NARV are is to start engaging these folks and then the resources and access that these enterprises have and give them...

...that platform to really build their business and grow and do great things. Yeah, that that makes a ton of sense. So you're seven months in. I'm curious what are some of the projects, if you're able to share it, some of the the big broad objectives that do your focusing on right now? Yeah, so I think one of the largest corporate objectives that were focused on is is returns. You know, we've all moved online. We buy more things ever before as consumers online and as a result, like a returning more things. And I think about Narvar. We created the category of post purchase almost a decade ago and we've done all of this incredible stuff. And you know, consumer behaviors now changing and Narve oar is trying to do everything to keep up and also exceed consumer expectations. So I think about this week we had a really exciting press announcement where we launched this product called home pickup, where I don't know if you're like me, but I have returns at my front door. It's it there for months. If you're years and now what nerver's doing. It's like hey, consumer, you can actually schedule one of our trucks to come pick up your return. You don't have to leave your house, you don't even have to be there and you're going to get your money back faster than sitting at the door. The brand's going to get their merchandise back faster and it's just a win win across the board. The consumers really happy because they want to do with the pain of a typical return on that. Yeah, and they don't have to leave their house. And I think about like this whole economy we're in, where it's like on demand consumption and give economy and, yeah, ocreation. It's like, what more could a consumer why? You know, that's so funny. It's an entire economy created on the premise that people are willing to leave their couches. You know what I'm saying? Like like Netflix, dock through the roof and you know door dash and and now you know the home returns. I mean I think that makes a ton of sense. Yeah, I mean that's a really good point. Like it's all built on no one wanting to leave their house. Yeah, we've gotten a bit too comfortable over the last couple of years. Yeah, we kind of have. Another makes a ton of sense. I was joking with you offline that anything that makes that process easier, it's definitely going to be a win because, you know, even today I find that sometimes if I'm asked to return something and it's not as simple as like, I think Amazon has something as simple of as just put it in a box, any box, you don't care how it's packed, and just take it to a hold of them and will take it off your hands. I'm like, okay, that's something that I can follow. But you know, anything beyond that, you know it's going to take some real serious brain power for me to figure out what the heck to do it by, you know, old TV stand or whatever that I got that's wrong or whatever. Yeah, I think before I started at Norvar like, I thought that was the most brilliant invention. I was like, Amazon, you're doing great things. Ye put it in this random box and drop it off and someone will facilitate the whole return process. And as I've gotten more ingrained in the actual business...

...and you know, keep unlocking little bits of information where I'm like, Oh wait, norve are enables us to do box list and label lists returns. Yeah, like, I would just like to know how many people you know that still on a printer, because that's the biggest thing. I don't understand. These brands that are like expecting you for. Yeah, last one. Yeah, I'm going to under my breath mention I have a printer. But anyways, that's neither here nor there. I would ask you a little bit about your career to this point as well, because one of the one of the things we love to do on the show is not just dig into growth marketing, which is obviously something I want to get back to, but also just tone stories of how people are are in the where that how they've gotten to where they are today, and and also how your experiences thus far of impacted the marketer that you are today. And and you know, I think it's really interesting that you started your career at every similar fashion, be which is with a likely ahead set on slam of the phones. I don't know if it was. It's funny because I think that rule is what today, that str role is. I don't know if you were an str and inside sales up or whatever. I was not an SDRROWS and side sales person, but I'm just curious. I mean that's that's a grind of a job. I see to this day where we're just a badge of honor to like on that, but just wondering, I guess, a what were some of the takeaways from that experience, because I'm sure that has to be the mark. And we're another and be like, what type of influence does that early experience have on whether it's your Worre Gothic for your idea, ideas or ideologies today, like how did that impact what's aboard you and how you are as a FP of Marketing Today? Yeah, it's a great question. I think I was so incredibly privileged to step into an str role because, to your point, it really should be seen as a badge of honor. You are out there cranking out underid cold calls, hundreds of emails, getting told no, no, no, over and over again, and it really taught me the value of perseverance, not letting one know get in the way of your next yes, not letting that negativity kind of cloud your mindset. It really fueled me to be more resourceful and I think it just really power to work, ethic that I'm so glad I developed at twenty two, because it did help me, I think, fuel my career path forward and in in ways that are somewhat unique. I don't have a traditional career in marketing. I started as an str I went into sales management in found my way into customer marketing, which helps me really understand that we should be putting the customer at the forefront of everything, not just as a retention play, but really is an acquisition play. That's before moving into marketing automation and you know, figuring out...

...how to put text t acts together and you know how to make everything talk, and then moving into a global ops roll before stepping into marketing managements. M I haven't had like a traditional path to a keep marketing role. By all the different experiences, I think have taught me very unique lessons and I really wouldn't create it for the world because I do think I have a rather different mindset than other marketing leaders when I sometimes sit down with them. Well, you speak to the work ethic. I think one of the other things that I forget, I read about or heard you say it in another interview, was there was an impact that occurred in that role around on just yourself, on product of sales for filled with a bunch of guys probably hold up the same. I'm just kind of curious about that as well, because one of the ideas that I think I've heard you mentioned before. Another view is that the impact of lack of diversity on that sales floor kind of led to some of the ideas that you've had, say in the customer marketing role, where you know if you're lacking in diversity, you're lacking perspectives. If we have a broad customer base or a diverse customer base. Lacking those ideas put you behind the appall a little bit as a brand. Yeah, can you speak to that a little bit again, because to me it seems like that's an incredibly important takeaway that you have and have had in your career so far. But I'd look to hear your articulated on our show for our audience about perhaps that early experience and again like how that maybe has shaped sort of the ideas and approaches that you've developed this non traditional path to be paypark day. Yeah, so I think it's definitely a journey learning some of these things. When I recognize that I was in a room where everyone was essentially a white man mom and I'm a white woman, so I know there's privilege that comes with all of that, but just thinking about it from a gender stampoint, I was just blown away because we were going after all of these different customers who are from all different types of backgrounds, men, women, nonbinary, and yet we only have one type of person on the phones trying to talk to them and support them. And like, how can we really build a business where we're creating sticky relationships when we're not matching what our customer base looks like or even how they think? How are we going to be able to really put messages into market that resonate when, you know, we have a very limited understanding of the world because we all have somewhat the same background, in the same view, and so I think about I thought about that early in my career and then as I've grown up I've noticed how it can really impact a business when you have a lack of diversity. You know, there's just there's only one way of thinking, there's not much inclusion and that leads to some discomfort. People don't necessarily feel comfortable showing up as their most authentic self if it is going to, you know, rail way from what everyone,...

...quote unquote, in the room looks like, our majority looks like, and when you have that it really just stunts creative thinking, critical thinking. Problem solving innovation and I don't look that harmful to your culture, but it really is harmful to your business and bottom line. Also recruitment efforts like it impacts everything absolutely. Ship really poor business to maintain a roster of folks that lack diversity. Yeah, it's situations where I've observed it in my career. There's a comfort level that is kind of maintained and I think to some extent, you know, embracing this comfort is something that makes not just individuals better but entities as well. Yeah, I think it's important. It's important to have that, that conversation. It's important to bring that, that thought up, because I think like the idea of just being able to relate to it. Just bring a business anddpoint, relate to your customer, be able to speak to your customers, speak with your customer. For having that sort of ability to do that, I think it's very much it is definitely going to be based on the ideas that come out of your organization. More diverse ideas mean more diverse conversation, so it's that makes a ton of sense to me. Cool. So I want to get back to growth market and I want to ask you and again I know you're still relatively new in your roleing on far, but whether it's Narvlor or previous rule, I'm just wondering, in any of these roles that you've had so far, is there a particular inial HIV or campaign that sort of stands out to you as a memorable for one reason or another? Yeah, I have a fun one. So I think maybe five years ago, I remember was like the height of all these d TOC brands being labeled UNICORNS and at the time I was marketing this technology that really was was enabling D to see brands to acquire more customers digitally, and so it was like, okay, how do we get more of these folks in the door start using our solution, and the add text space, I was an advertising technology is incredibly busy, noisy. It's so hard to break through and so, you know, initially I was doing a lot of media and email marketing and you know we're going to these events and, you know, meeting these people wherever they are, but it was still hard because it was such a noisy space. And so one of the things the team and I did we sat down or like okay, what can we do? That's like a little bit different, and so we came up with this idea of a direct mail campony, which we'd mess really leaned into before, and we ordered hundreds and hundreds of Unicorn Pin Yadas wow after them, and we put this little note and it was it was something like, you know, spotting a Unicorn and can be as difficult as finding the right technology for your business. But you know, we've managed to do that. And so I remember sending it over to Casper because I think they were the first one yea that and really label the Unicorn and I was shocked that some of these sea sweets...

...and SPPs that we were mailing them to we're actually then responding to, you know, our follow up maybe email campaigns or digital ads that we were retargeting, and some of the feedback I got was like it was just fun. Yeah, it was a fun departure from the typical marketing that I'm seeing and I never get any fun mail, like a shitty mailer or it's, you know, some cheap wine or this and that, and you know, bringing a big Pinata into some of these offices really, I think helped set us apart from some of the other players and we just leaned into that fully. Afterwards, that's awesome. They're like, okay, direct mails are on tap channel, and so we were then like sending out shark Pinata's it's shark week, and sending out connect fors and, oh my gosh, so many other one of the ones I really liked that we did was we got an artist to do custom illustrations of I think it was a twenty female executives that advertising Ad Week had published a list on, and we're like, okay, they're on the retail sector, you know they love beautiful things and experiences. Let's send them like Nice portraits of themselves artist. And that was another nice way which we personally something. We are able to cut through the noise and really connect with these folks on a one to one level. That's phenomenal. I've probably done like thirty or fort these episodes and and I haven't heard something like that and I'm reminded of even just on a on a like way less intricate skill, when I get an email amongst the many that I received that are so sitting business, when someone has something that stands out. Like again, I'm a sales person by trade. I can't help but say yeah, man like or yeah, good job, like, that's a great email. I'll take the meat it. or I'm notorious for buying magazine subscriptions to this day for people would who are out hustling, knocking on doors and just doing the things that other people just aren't doing right now. So totally respect that move. I'm curious because, and again one of the dirty secrets about this show is that I love to kind of just learn tips and tricks myself that we can fly to our business. And I'm curious, like, what's the tie back to the sales process? Because it's phenomenal. Right, you get you get the response back. Where does it go from there? I'm just kind of curious, like how did that end up converting and how did you sort of tie in sales or or whatever the next step in your process would have been. Yeah, so I'm just going to get really in the weeds here. So what we do? We pluged our direct mail system directly into sales force and are I think of the time we were using maybe outreach and so triggered once these items were delivered. Yes, sales one to one message to the end, the end, so that we could clearly follow that process from like delivery to first touch, to meeting to opportunity, and be able to at Ribaut it accordingly. I am an ideas persons sometimes, like these things...

...can get away from me. I hear you. Attribution is so important and you need to have pieces in place and have like the right marketing offs talent there to set all the framework apps you can really justify, you know, scaling out programs like this. Love the idea and I understand what you're saying about like getting into the weeds, getting the nitty gritty and being able to measure it properly. There are people who are incredibly talented at as sort of making sure that those systems are talking to each other, and what that tells me is that, you know, there's significant resources on the table here too. I mean it's not just sort of the process of acquiring the Pinyada isn't setting them out, but you're talking about a direct mail system that's integrated within your crrm, that's also the type to your sales and aplement solution, and all of those systems are talking to one another. Yeah, that's a phenomenal orchestration there. Yeah, I mean, I'm not going to say it was a hundred percent, but it takes a village, I think, to act keep these campaigns in the right way. Yeah, so, yeah, yeah, a lot. It's cool they hear. I mean, look at again, we're startup and so a lot of people are wearing lots of different hats. But like it's also it's cool to understand like what the world looks like when you have specialists who are in there, like you said, in the village, like collaborating together to make these these happen. So really, really interesting and I love to hear that. I guess of the this direct male kind of kept paying. What what did you sort of take away from that? I mean, obviously standing out work, so I'm sure is one of the ideas, but were there any sort of other things that learn from there, whether it's from direct outcomes or maybe internal like collaboration, that you then were able to kind of apply to other campaigns or perhaps and in future roles as well? Yeah, I think there were. There were two big things. One, and I'm a really firm believer in this, and some people may like just wildly disagree with this comment, but like we are at work more than we're at home days and it's been like this, I feel like, for decades, like we should be having fun with what we're doing. Yeah, and I think this whole kind of direct mail initiative that I was able to work on really showcase that, like other people also want to have fun. Yeah, like people buy from other people. Yeah, and so have a personality, like set yourself apart beyond, you know, just your value, probably. Yeah. And then I think the other pieces. There really is a need for internal buy and whenever you're doing a campaign like this. So in order for your, let's say, the Unicorn Mailing Campaign to be successful, like, I really needed my str team and my nr price sales groups on board so that everyone knew what, explicitly, we were trying to accomplish, what the narrative or story was that we were tying to that, so that we can be paying a consistent voice and experience for that. And byre yeah, I mean just what you're describing, Mike. so much sense that, like you know, whether it's the Pinata campaign, whether it's...

ABM, whether it's some strategy that's that the next best strategy, like having that internal buy and an alignment is the best way to make sure that you're going to maximize as your Roi on that right like like hey, SDR, you need to do this at this point. Hey Enterprise, you got to do this at this point, but the store were trying to accomplish. Why? Yeah, so, okay, that's that's pretty awesome. I love that campaign. Again, I think there's there's a lot for me to kind of first I take away and chew on there a little bit. So I'd really appreciate you you're sharing that. I wander as we kind of wrap up our conversation today, kind of just get your perspective on marketing in general. So a couple questions is to kind of wrap up our conversation around. That's like, you know, if you were going to get some advice to other marketers, whether upandcoming or seasoned, of what they should either start doing today, if they're not already, or stop doing today if they are, what advice would you give in either of those two scenarios? So my first piece of advice and be fail fast. Okay, I think a lot of times people are like so nervous that failing. But like in order to be part of a growing organization, like failure is should be expected. Like feel forward and don't beat yourself up over that's how you get better. The second piece, which I am so passionate about and it drives me not. Okay, our vanity metrics like row those out the window. Do not use those as a way to incape performance or success or failure. And I know a lot of times it's really hard to break away from vanity metric. Or sure, a lot of times, you know, these are asks coming directly from executive teams or leadership that may not one hundred percent understand marketing. Yep, but I would just say try to lean more into reporting on the metrics that are actually going to matter and really indicate success rather than page views. And sure, sure, are those metrics consistent across businesses? Is that you've worked with or is it very much unique? Because when I think about our business, like can you lead, it's just like that's our life blood, like that's the north star metric. I mean it's I imagine that's always here to be the kiss some extent. Yeah, I mean I think leaning into those pipeline metrics like a new leads and in dwells and and sal's and looking at velocity metrics and no, slas that are you know, we're following. I think those are means are really important to report on when thinking about growth marketing. Yep, and I think the thing to also recognize there it's not like a lone wolf type of reporting play like that has to be plugged in with like the str inside sales function, because you're passing off all the leads they're like. There has to be this element of collaboration to and it comes down to reporting on all of this. It can't just be marketing blindly. There's a set of security and comfort that I'm I'm ob we're bringing you. When you talk...

...about like the amount that you rely on others to account for the success against your objectives, which ultimateize your own success. I think you mentioned something earlier about you know, your the ideas person and there's the opps team that that contributes as a member of the family or member of the village, and you know the SDRs or SDR managers contribution to the metrics that you're reporting to the executive team. It's incredibly important for there to be that alignment. Just a I don't even know this is a question, more just observation. I think that takes a tremendous amount of like comfort and security in your own skill set to be able to sort of just share that. You know, I think that's so important for people to understand, like particularly your up been coming or, yeah, trying to make a name for yourself. I think one of the pieces of advice that I got really on early on in my career from one of my first bosses was always higher people that are smarter than you and around yourself with teams that are better than you and I. So I really try to I try to lean into that, right, like we're all pretty strong alone, but we're really powerful together. Yeah, and so just recognizing that it does take a village, like you can't be a lone wolf moving the needle like that. Yeah, Yale of business, you need great people with great ideas right by you. Absolutely. I really appreciate you sort of commenting on that and speaking to a little bit super, super resent. Okay, a couple more of these than I promised. A you go, I know it's yeah, it's Friday evening. If you had twice the staff, budget or time, which would you prefer and what would you do with it? Time hand, of course, like, look, I'm never going to say no to extra money and like, yes, I need more headcount, but like what leader isn't saying that by a'm so incredibly fortunate to have a team of brilliant people and I feel like if we had some additional time we could really be, you know, maybe more strategic, take a little bit extra time to analyze results and optimize and put together key takeaways. But ultimately we're in a really fast rope, fast growing business in a fast these industry, so time is just not on our side. So you know, it's important to figure out ways to, quote unquote, slow down, but time always have whatebout it were. That makes sense. Last one for our audience today. I think I also heard you mention that your prolific in terms of your linkedin follows. Amongst them or any authors that you read or leaders in the space that you admire? Who stands out as someone that we should look at too and read or listen to? Yeah, so thinking about marketing leaders, there's there's kind of two flavors right now that I'm really hot on. So one is the marketing operations side of the House. So I've been closely...

...following Sarah McNamara, who marketing, off flat and Daryl Alfonso over an Amazon. They both just crank out amazing content. Yeah, and Dan and you're like you're just able to take some of those tidbits and run with them. You're like, okay, thank you for, you know, seating something like that. That's vice. So I love following them. And then the other kind of flavor right now that I'm getting more interested in in terms of linkedin content consumption is around content marketing. Evans Devin read over it Gong. I've been following him a lot and I just I just love the way in which he's redefining content marketing for a BTB company. Yeah, and I feel like he's also going to bridging or blurring the lines with like what an influencer is, and he's kind of creating this like professional influencer persona and it's just it's different and it's fun and it's unique and I love I love things that are different. Yeah, take the shake the ship up a little totally. You know, I was talking to another kind of be to be influencer named Daniel Murray. He hads up marketing millennials podcast. How I had his big his big takeaway was your linkedin page for Bob Brands is like a huge opportunity not just to connect with people but to like established that brand voice. You know, you're where the company that that sends up Pinyonos, because we believe in X Y Z or, you know, just that personality, that voice. Yeah, and that that you know, someone like devins has a face to it as well. But you know, I think there's there's definitely some interesting balance there and I think opportunity for sure. And Ganga, I think it's one of the best in the business set at doing that. Oh my gosh, they really are. I mean over the last year just seeing what Devan's been able to do for gone and seeing how they're in market with personality to your point, totally exciting, so inspiring. Yeah, like all businesses, but then also just marketers could definitely take a play from his book. Yeah, absolutely, we'll keep our eyes on I don't follow Sarah. I see her post floating around, but we'll definitely add her to my feed here. But Um, Catherine, this is great. I really appreciate you being so generous through your time on a Friday evening and in New York. But some phenomal conversation appreciate it. Yeah, thank you, Bobby. I really enjoyed it and thank you for having me on the show today. Yep, thanks for being here. Thanks for listening to growth marketing camp. If you enjoyed this episode, would love it if you'd give it a quick five star rating or share it with a friend or colleague looking to give a little more inspiration for their next campaign. If you want to learn more about the company behind the show, had to open sensecom. That's open se n Secom. Will catch you on the next episode.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (74)