Growth Marketing Camp
Growth Marketing Camp

Episode 51 · 2 months ago

Crawford & Company’s Digital Journey with Scott Bynoe

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this week’s episode of Growth Marketing Camp, Scott Bynoe, Marketing Director, Global Loss Adjusting at Crawford & Company, shares his advice to tech leaders: never stop innovating - else you risk commoditization.

He shares how depth of knowledge and passion is a prerequisite for being excellent at your job and that sometimes having a chaotic mind in marketing can help you produce beautiful things. Scott leads with empathy and curiosity and covers his list of priorities when taking a new role, and how it’s essential for every marketing department to have an internal narrative. Tune in and enjoy!

Welcome to growth marketing camp, or we sit down with our favorite marketers to do mystify growth and give you the insights to help turn your next campaign into a major success. Let's get into it. What's up, Ladies and gentlemen, this is bobby and the Rangue, cohost of growth marketing camp. I am super excited to be joined by Scott by now. He's marketing director at Crawford and company. Scott, welcome to the program thanks, probably thanks, robing. We appreciate it. Yeah, excited to have you on. One of the reasons I'm particularly excited is because I feel like we don't get to talk to a lot of marketing professionals in your interstry, but maybe we can just start there. Tell us a little bit about Crawford and company. Tell us a little about your roles there today. Yeah, thanks. Yeah, so, Crawford and company has been around since the forties. It was started by man by the name of Jim Crawford, who it's started out as a law sudjusting company. In for a lot of people are like what is what is loss adjusting? And essentially, you know, in a nutshell, it's it's claims administration, its claims management. Right. So, you know, within particularly the property and casualty insurance space, when you have a claim, for example, not all the time will you be dealing with that insurance company. Right. A lot of the time the insurance company what outsourced the the administration and the management of that claim to a company like Crawford. And you know, there's a variety of reasons for doing that. There could be, you know, for scale, just a you know, a big thing for us, in a big differential to us, is just the depth of expertise that we have in in a variety of areas. You know, you, like you as a carrier, you might not be employing a whole slow of forensic accountants and, you know, engineers and all these people to do these kind of obscure and sometimes really esoteric insurance can it? Hey, you want to, you want a company like Crawford that has the bench strength of expertise to do that for you. And so a lot of the time when you have some of those those types of claims, whether they're high volume, low complexity, or you have claims that are, you know, very low volume but extreme, in saying, crazy complexity, with all sorts of random kind...

...of, you know, specialties that you wouldn't even realize that you know. Yeah, that was a job. Yeah, you'll have those people on staff to help with that and so not. In a nutshell, is is kind of what Crawford does and sort of the law sudjusting angle. There are other areas of business in terms of like third party administration, medical management. Sure, I cattached your free response. You know, we got a whole platforms area, which is a lot of technology innovation. Yeah, and so there's there's a lot of people. It's sort of in the mix of Crawford. But you know, within my role in my world, what I look at is marketing specifically for our loss adjusting arm. Of that there's okaytor, what I just describe Gotcha. You know, there's a few directions. I could see this, this conversation going just based on what you've described. But I am kind of curious. I mean, what you're describing is a service that's provided to insurance companies and I'm I'm a customer of an insurance company, I'm the son of an insurance agents. I'm aware that there's maybe like a dozen or so brands. I think that I'm aware of but tell us a little bit about your market. I mean when when you're marketing your company services, what does that look like? What's the ecosystem look like? What's your your addressabul market look like? I'm just kind of curious, like who you're potentially selling services to in general. Before, as like with new city, were the son of an insurance ation forr yeah, and you didn't end up an insurance. That's right. See if that's rare. I had somebody tell me. I'll answer your question, but I had somebody tell me once ninety five percent of the people who end up an insurance got there by accident. May wakes up, one dances, you know, as a kid. Your say you're you're six yearold. Ask My son something. Yeah, you will never stay down. I would love one day to work in insurance. Yeah, I mean if it's something in financial service, is great, but insurance would be would be wonderful it. And so to somebody say that to me. Ninety five percent people you wind up there by accident because of some readason. Hey, the other four percent are actuaries, people and hat like. Actually did say that one day they wanted to work insurth. The other hucks and people who are the child of somebody who worked an insurance so yeah, I always find it fascinating when somebody who grew up around insurance I said yeah,...

...no, thanks, Hey, Scott. Well, it's good we got to this point in the conversation where I can tell you of a massive disappointment to my parents. Does joke? It just joking? No, it's a phenomenal profession and honestly, like a I would highly recommend it to anybody who has any sense of sales, customer service background or skill sets, because as insurance that you get to help people like in the time of need, and I think that's something that's really valuable. You know, like people are confronting like difficult times, like you're able to take at the phone call someone who literally knows them and cares about them. At least that's the way the industry was as I was going up. I'm sure things have changed, but certainly this interview isn't about me and my feelings on the insurance of district, although it will inform some of the questions that I have about it. I was going to say yeah, but that's a that's a very interesting perspective right, because I think a lot of people have that negative connotation. Sometimes it in turns, but I think the beautiful because you have an interesting perspective in that the claim and this is why I love working with Crawford in a claims administration companies, because your tethink of a policy and you've policies of promise right, and you kind of go get that that point of like you know, you hope you never need it, correct when you do, it's the chance. That's when the carrier, the broker, the insurance can be steps up to the plate. It says we're actually going to deliver on that promise. And Yep, to be part of a company where you're at that point, like you're at that apex, where you are actually helping somebody, is pretty amazing. Absolutely. To give back to your question in terms of like our addressable market with do I look like so? Yeah, no, profferd it's a beat of B company. Didn't know we are. We are dealing with the individual, like you and I, as a policy holder making a claim many times. But our actual quiet, you know, the people paying the bills are the insurance carrier. So our addressable market you'd be looking at carriers and selves property and causal. The insurance companies you'd be looking at. Brokers people have an influence on those companies in terms of like how they administered that claim. When the writing certain claims, whether it's for a corporation, some sort of business or an individual, you might have like a named adjuster within that. So the the broker's play, if weed roll and that another sort of customer...

...for us and what maybe a lot of people don't realize it's like when you have large, like very large corporations, they might have an extremely high deductible or they might self insure because they're so big, they're so massive and it just makes financial sense for them to have plaps people on staff. It'll actually self ensure self managed claims that come through. So that's the segment of a Mark Beli deal with. To say, you know, I'm not going to name in clients, but like sure you know x multinational massive light has suffers. You know, a warehouse fire, loses all the inventory, loses the building itself, has business interruption. So you can you can hear already. There's four or five specialties that I've just mentioned where they would have to, you know, somebody like us come in and help them kind of stort through that and figure out, you know, it's US damage, just sus loss ability for recovery, things like that. Absolutely, I mean that makes a ton of sense. Yeah, I appreciate that background and like really, really interesting use case. I'm going to be thinking about after after our conversation today. But I want to talk a little bit about your role and your profession because, again, I think it's really interesting. One of the things I noticed about Crawford's sort of brand, at least just in some high level poking around, is that there's an emphasis on the fact that the company has been in business for over eighty years, but there's also this shared in emphasis on the fact that they are innovators in the space, their technology driven. Talk to me a little bit about being a marketer at a company that has to balance being sort of like a stalwart, like an eighty year old institution, but also needs to be able to push the envelope in terms of messaging in the market about being an innovator. Talk to me a little bit about that, because that's a really interesting juxtaposition. You know, it's not like a company that was founded twelve years ago or fifteen years ago to eighty years ago. Tell me a little about that as a challenge or you know how that influence is some of the work that you're creating these days? Yeah, and that's it. That's a great observation and I think it's a very student, I think, observation in terms of how we like how do you how do you package that mess? I really do that the and and you said it...

...perfectly. It's like I feel like I couldn't say better than what you just said. There is a JUXTA position between the traditional history in which the company was built, yeah, which is still a huge part of the fabric of what the company is, law suggusting. It's still for a lot of a lot of cases it's a physical person on site totally. There's a lot of empathy involved, you know, really understanding what's going on with that particular individual or their business. So some of that actually it really hasn't changed. But I the way I look at it is that, you know, we have now we're in a we're in a space where technology has disrupted every single business on the planet and you know, Life Insurance, PNC insurance and you know, in terms of claims administration in the world. That I mean, it's not immune to that right and and you know, I think there's just like any other industry, that disruption was probably not welcoming that some point or you know, change is hard. Nobody likes to change and you know it's going to take over my job. But what I like to tell people with the idea, with the innovation and technology that we employed, it enhances our people's ability to do what they're already doing absolutely. You know, technology doesn't replace the relationship right and I think what's important, I think, for people understand with our businesses that it's very much relationship based, not only with like us in our actual customers are clients like any truths, carry, incorporations, the brokers, but that that adjust themselves in the relationship that they have with that policy. So the innovation technology is enhancing our ability to work through those things more efficiently because, as you can imagine, if I'm an insurance carrier or corporation, the longer that claim is open, the more ambiguity there is that can come out of them, that can rise from that. If you're the individual policy holder and you need to be made hole in some way where you want to get your money as soon as possible so we can employ technology with the empathy of the expertise in the people that we have to make that happen faster. Everybody wins, and I think so, and I think, like I said, you put it really really well, is that there is that balance between employing that technology. So it's not to say like you're going to...

...call and talk to a robot. You know, everybody hates that sort of thing where you can you know when you could tell that you're you're speaking to the thing and like, you know, don't want tell me more about your problem and you're just like speak to an Asian. Yeah, it's an Asia, like yeah, I didn't understand a respect like we never want technology to get in the way of that relationship right. And so it is a challenge because there is a lot of excitement, I would say, an innovation, happening within the industry and it's becoming it's not even a differentiator, it's table states, like you need to have the stuff employeding to your business, for you're going to die or you're going to haul behind or you know your large customers going to go. Well, are indemnity cost this x amount? We need to lower. So we need to you know, we need to pick up the pace, we need to close things faster. What can you do to make that happen? And so in this is again it's not just a Cropford thing. This is kind of like in any business thing. Once that technology becomes pervasive, it's no longer a differentiator or a nice to have, it's a table stake, and that that's happens. It gets commoditizer you. You run the risk of being commoditized if you don't innovate with it. And so I would say with Crawford and with with a lot of her competitors and people within this industry, we're all on this kind of digital journey right cool figuring out like what technology is, the technology one employe and how to actually incorporate in your business so you don't lose like the secret sauce of Your Business. Because, you know, I would say, and I said this, the people what is that? A business like ours doesn't differentiate because of the technology. It's still actually goes back to the earthly fortage. When this business was started, it was about the people in the empathy. It's knowing how and when to use that technology to drive that relationship and drive the business for love that in spite really really, I think, smart and and I think like definitely informative about the trends in the industry. I'm also kind of struck by just your kind of overall knowledge and sort of direct a passion about like what you're talking about right now, which I think is really cool to see and kind of curious about. Like just, you know, generally speaking, in this is sort of a little bit of a pivot from our conversation. Does that level of sort of like depth of knowledge and call it even passionate...

...about your company or your product and offering? Do you you that as sort of like a prerequisite to being damn good at your job, or like, is this just sort of who you are and what you personally bring to the table like the tell me a little about that because, you know, I also know that you're relatively new at Crawford and you're building a team out there. Do you look for that type of quality in people that you're bringing to your team? So it's kind of a multipart question about you know, is that something that's required in general? Is that just unique for you and is that something that plays into your philosophies around team building for Marketing Organization. I think it helps, right. I know I'm like a chaotic line, right, and if a lot of marketers that that you know, you know this is that there's an ounce, or sometimes many ounces, of chaos that kind of go into, you know, the way that we said, like in marketing, and I think good marketing, there's a bit of a method that's that mad, sometimes all over the place, and then it's like a beautiful mind setter piece of in there, right, it comes together and it's like this magical moment of like okay, you know, if we did it right, like as a leader and as I'm thinking about building a team in the people, not even just on my team but like adjacent to me, and I look for that passion, not necessarily my insanity in a way, because I knew them. I know I'm really passionate and I know some I get heated and I just get so into it and people are just like Gosh, like that must be the most exciting place to work. I'm like for me, it is for somebody else, because sometimes I'd like peep outside of marketing, especially people outside of insurance. The say, Scott, what you do and I tell them and I'm just like get excited. But I see that as plays right for me. I think passion is a requirement. But people, I think people express passion in a different way right here. It doesn't have to be as animated or as kind of insane as I can sometimes get when I get really like into something and I sort of think my teeth into him, but I just want people who give a shit. So for me it's like I need to see. So this is like for people on my...

...team. If I don't see you give a shit, it's going to be hard for me to work and give a shit. Yes about it, if you don't write and so and the way that you show that. It's going to be different for everybody else, just like anything else in the way that people are motivated and how people work. And I'm very open into the ways that people work, just as I'm very open to the ways that people give a shit, right. And so, yeah, I think you know, the thing that's a stall for me is that if I if I feel like the people that are adjacent to me, that I'm either working for or working with, if I see like a lack of passion, and this isn't just marking. This is anything in business. It's hard for me to get excited about your business if you're not excited about it too. Sure, and you know, you might be talking to somebody who's just kind of like monetone, but you can tell that big care. Yeah, they're still here for that reason. With Crawford, we have a lot of people been it for a long time right, like there's some people been here thirty plus year. It's but the cool thing is, and when I came into it, I was thinking like, Oh, they're probably just staunch it, there's just waiting to retire and just another way for that package. But these people give a shit, like yeah, you can tell some of the people that I work with that have been here for a while. Yeah, we're still here for the same reason, I think that they got excited about working for Crawford and the beginning and soldier speak as a company. That's the kind of stuff that I kind of like latch onto and look totally because it's that motivates me and that gets yeah, yeah, I'm pretty happy, I guess, as the simplest way to describe to hear that that Crawford and stills that sort of sentiment amongst people that have been there for decades, like when I talk about open sense, you know, one of the CO founders here. The way that I feel really good, the best describing the company is that it's a team of people who really give a shit, like to literally the words that you're using, and it's about the customer, it's about the company, it's about each other, like those three sort of vectors. Like it's cool to hear that that's something that you that's been able to be sort of maintained at a company that's been around for eighty years. I mean, that's that's really, really neat. You know, we talked a little bit about your passion and whether...

...or not that's something that you think is sort of prerequisite amongst your team or, you know, adjacent to your team. But let's let's dive a little bit deeper. You join the company roughly sixty seven months ago. Like what is your list of priorities when you're taking a new role at a company like this? I'm curious did you bring any background into this, like did you have knowledge of the industry coming into this? And I think the answer is yes, but but tell us a little bit about that if that set you up for success here, or if you have just sort of like a mental sort of checklist of things you need to accomplish, like as you get your sea legs beneath you, you know, within these first few months. Really what I'm trying to understand is, like, what's your game plan, you know, as a director, as you as you take this role, to really kind of become effective, it's quickly as possible, and ultimately to build a team as well? Yeah, it's a good question and I think it's regardless of the company that I've joined or that anybody joins, I think the formula for me is very similar. I mean the approach is going to be different based on the company itself and Mike, who I have access to, like culture the like. Is it very open? Can I talk to anybody where? Is it more like, you know, stick with in your lane, Scott, don't follow these people over here? And one thing I'll say about with profitable. What I like is that it's very open. It's kind of like you want to talk to somebody Singapore, talk to somebody Singapore. You want, it's our goal. Just call him on. Obviously the time difference makes it kind of taken. But but the thing is there's a culture. I think there's a culture of sharing and learning and that's to me that's conducive in terms of the way that I work and I think my approach to Crawford is I do have, I would say I do have some like big rocks that I'm trying to move kind of like some end goals. Okay, but I'm more about at least in the first little bit, in the first couple months for me especially, was I just kind of unleashed my curios it was more but like I didn't and I had a great cmoh, she's amazing in that there wasn't pressure to be like Scott, do something, make this collateral, update the website, like start cranking out stuff right and and I think you know, I've worked in Organiz positions where it's been the opposite.

Like Scott, it's week one, where's the thing that you'd like? You, I mean like. So the Nice thing about this I've had time to kind of go through my own process and I think that's helpful, especially when you have a business that's complex. So, yes, I had some understanding of the business just coming from PSYDECA, from life insurance previous. Okay, so slightly different, but I did. I did get kind of the mechanics of interns and understanding how a Tta work, the third party administrator, how claims kind of worked, in the importance of all that stuff. But I've never worked in a company quite like this, a global company at that that's really sort of spread out and having a man did you know, my mandate being global as well, not just looking at cannon, I'm just standing yes, but looking at North America as a whole and then looking globally within this business. You know that I support and I think I kind of liking it. Back to when I was working in life insurance, I stepped away from marketing for a few years and I worked in a strategy role supporting our North American business and that kind of opened the curtain to how the business work and you know, I was learning a whole heck of a lot about, you know, the puzzle pieces of where you know a policy move through the company and how profitability worked and you know just how that whole you know basically how the sausage and Yep, and I think that that exposure, I think helped me a huge amount with this just massive transfer will skill coming back into marketing ahead of kind of taken that forward because I don't know about you, but I've I've worked at some marketing organizations where the marketing leadership is just like just know enough, yeah, Oh, enough to get your job done. Don't worry about the other stuff. You know, you don't have to know how the sausages made. Just, Hey, sure that when they when they've made the sausage that you're talking about. Why? This is the best off right, and I mean that works for some people, especially if you're just trying to crank stuff out. And I think when I had the exposure to strategy, I was like that's not I don't like I don't like that style. I actually prefer to be curious and allow my teams to be curious and encourage them to push them. Yeah, they learn as much about this business as you possibly can, for a variety of reason, one being you might actually...

...discover a passion within this business. So you didn't know, sure you might. You might realize that you want to go do this. Maybe don't want to park, and that's okay, right, like you might find a passionate something else and that's wonderful. But ultimately for me it while they're in that position and they're a marketing, you know, strategist or executor, where it happen to be, I think the more you know about the business, the more context that you have. Yeah, the better stuff you may right. It's just nothing feels regurgitated, nothing feels to cosmetic or fluffy, because the language that you choose to use, of the images that you choose to use it, the channels, of the way that you execute, is so in tune with the point, like the entire purpose of what it is that we do. I think it's worth the investment in time in that person. Yeah, do that, and so I was lucky and fortunate enough to have a Cmo that gave me that time and gave you that license to do that, and I think what it's led to me now. So I'm almost six months and I'm now at this point where I sat back and have identified a full ton of opportunity being a bit more strategic about what I do, because I get I don't want to be just crank and stuff out. I was in a meeting last meeting members. I was talking about this and I said I'm not going to be in this particular rule forever. I'm going to move on somewhere else in this company, have a company, whatever happens to be. But I have I have a responsibility as the steward of how marketing sits within this particular business, because it's a new role, just a get getting idea what I've come into, which is which is a gift in accurse. Right. So there's there's no road map, it's kind of black campus. I can do what ever want. But it also means like I'm having new conversations and, you know, talk about things that I thought maybe I wouldn't have had to have to do, but which is great sure, as it allow me to kind of push that agenda Ford and I think for me, having that ability to do that is setting me up now to be a long Moore strategic than I would have been before. And so when I said like as a steward, I'm trying to create basically a structure or framework that I can work myself out of the job or I can leave and know to myself I've...

...created a structure that not only allows people to come in and be productive and successful quicker, but I created some connections in alignment to the business world. They know the value of marketing and they understand that inherently and they know how to use marketing and they also know when not to use yeah, I think that's part of it as West. It's cool because I've I heard multiple sort of perspectives in your response. There one which I want to call out is just by real really kind of diving head first into the business and really familiarizing yourself with everything to it. Like your point, you never know how somebody knew is going to see the same thing and, through that perspective, be able to create that next best way of talking about it or communicating its value or whatever the case might be. Right like everybody brings a unique perspective. If you're looking at enough stuff with that context that you're describing, well then maybe they'll be something interesting or innovative or new or better that comes out of it. So I totally understand the value of that. And then and then the other part of what you're describing is that you know you may be taking a role at a company that has not existed before and obviously there will be, in certain circumstances, the pressure to produce and to perform but but really, I think what the takeaway that I'm hearing from you is that, like, in addition to being an individual contributor who's knocking out of the park, you also need to make it the structure, like basically chip your way into the process, chip your way into the structure there, so that, whether it's you or the next person who fills your role or fills your shoes, like, there's a real thing there. And and I think that's a really interesting challenge that I'm wondering how many of marketers in our audience kind of have to deal with where, you know, maybe they're coming into a startup, you know, where there's not maybe all the marketing tradition was he was was executed by the founder and and now they've got to come in and establish the role, established the department, you know, and really kind of build the...

...structures and processes that will withstand the the test of time, which it sounds like as a part of your role right now, which I think is super, super cool. It definitely is. It's one of those things to where, I mean the startup example is interesting and I almost look at this company like that, which sounds crazy because it's eighty plus years old. Yeah, but you know, even traditionally, and I would say Crawford, in terms of how marketing is positioned and leverage within the company, where are during OK, I think we're breaking out of that traditional mold of like how to use marketing and you know, we don't just make pretty power points and choose foughts right, like hey, it's kind of changing the perceptions across the organization because, like you, I love the example of the start up in that you know, traditionally the founder would have donal of the marketing themselves. They would have created their own you know, Google adwords account and like yeah, on going their way through it. And you know, a lot of that happens in a traditional company like crows from where a lot of the marketing was handled by the business were handled by sales just out of necessity because it wasn't really an ingrained or carved out function as a center of excellence, if you will, within the company. And so you know, as we move through this journey, it's really kind of creating that structure, but having those conversations across the business to to go in a bit of a road show to tell people what you do and yeah, sometimes in marketing, and you know it's not just marking. I've had conversations with people in Ike, people on hr who have similar struggles that marketing does sometimes where there's an assumption about what you do. Right. We all have these assumptions as to what HR dons. Well, they just hired fire people, but a I t all they do is that they annoyed by asking if you turn it on. Yeah, yeah, like about right. And I think the thing is what we need to do, especially if you're in a company where they are innovating and they're changing the way. In the view of marketing, we have to realize that you're going to have some folks and some people in the organization you have to have that conversation with to actually just tell them this is what we do right. Absolutely show them what we do, because I think too often we either rife about all people don't people don't know what we do. Leave yeah, no idea, and then you complain about it. If work, you assuming that they...

...know. So when you do stuff and you don't get the feedback that you were hoping, you're going, what the hell? Like, yeah, if they see the brilliance in the genius that I've just I've just given them this gift, right. But yeah, because people don't sometimes understand. Yeah, that's a phenomenal point as well. And this goes back to your the word that you use a steward, you know, stewardship. Stewardship for the department is making sure that everyone knows what the hell they're doing and what you're accomplishing. Yeah, I think that there's probably, you know, so even in my own personal professional life, I think there are people that I know who are far better at tuting their own horn than others, and I think that there is, particularly in business. I feel like there's a lot of value in tuting your own horn and making sure everybody knows what the hell you're doing and that you're doing a damn good job of it. And Yeah, so, I don't know. I mean that's that's I think sometimes like a internal balance or struggled I do with, is like, you know, balancing humility with like actually, know we're kicking ass right now. Pardon my French, but it reminds me of, like, you know that the saying was like the shoe cobbler with the shit and shoes. Right. It's because, like you know, it. It's funny. And Marketing and marketing we're communicated or we're just very, very good community is writing. And sometimes we do it. We do it terrible job of communicating about ourselves because we're so busy worrying about how the message of the company or the business or sales or whoever. We're kind of taking care of everybody, right, but we're not sometimes taking care of ourselves and we're not communicating internally enough about what it is that we do in a way that like positions us as the expert communicants, right, because it's like that again, like I said, that's saying the shoe called right, and it's like sometimes you need to take a step back and think, like do we even have our own in turning there, yeah, a, yeah, yeah, and it's some of that, you know, taking some of that me time that Selfcre know, absolutely there for marketing. Yeah, good, transition their self care and not direct. But I did want to ask you. I'm a recently a Dad, my son's ten half months old, and I believe you're a father of two, if I'm not mistaken,...

...got two kids. Yeah, son and told the kind of three and a half gir old. You yeah, so, Um, I'm just curious, I mean talking to a little about sort of like the impact of, you know, kids in your profession or perspective or time, you know, how have you sort of balanced that with your career? And I'm and what type of impact do you think that's had on your career one way or another? Yeah, that's a great question. It's entirely hundred percent positive. I mean, as you know, becoming a parent, it changes your perspective on literally everything in your entirely right and your career is not immune to that right. And I think, I think for me before I became a dad, and it's not just about becoming a doubt and I think it's a level of self awareness that have been able to kind of pick up along the way, but I think becoming a dad kind of it's sort of amplified that. You know, I used to put a lot of stress on myself to perform or to be able to do things, or I would set goals for myself to kind of like live in the future, a love like I would. I wasn't really like a dweller, I wouldn't dwell on the past, but I would always be like looking to other people like where they would like. They're driving back car sy. I would never be blet for that car. I need to see chase like salary and you chase tem you chase these things of measures of success and you go, I need that thing. And I got into some trouble with just like my own mental health of dealing with stress and anxiety. I had a point where I kind of hit a walt and I just didn't I didn't know how to compute it and deal with it, and it was this is going back the two thousand and seven, two thousand and maid, okay, and I didn't really know what mental health was. Right. I can't understand that that meant. And it wasn't until my brain in my body said time, I like you like too much, that I was kind of forced to deal with it and actually take that time to think about myself and and you know, I started to meditate and I certain how you think her. I would search to think about myself and work on myself. You know. Then fast forward to then having kids. You know what that did for me? It was it was kind of like another step in that...

...direction of yeah, not living in the past, not living in the future, because the thing is, and you'll in people probably said this to you, your kid grows up so fast. Yeah, like, yeah, it's people said this to him againsh right, like you. It's like, yeah, here are so many times like Oh, you know that. Somebody said this to me once, that the nights are long but the years are short. Yeah, and I was like I remember when he said this, mean, like that's stupid. But the thing is, it's like after a few years he you know. You know, it different when I had my second. So my son was saying half of my guys, my daughter was born and I remember him walking into the room after my way keep berth and he was the first person to meet his sister's cool and he never looks so old, really little guy. Yeah, but he'd look in that moment. I was like Holy Shit, and it's like, I think for me, kids force you to really live in that moment, because kids live in the moment. Yeah, kids are impulsive, they're about the right now. They have seal patience for any shit right like the and there's no fourth on or planning for anything. And Yeah, I look at that and that that there's a sense of curiosity, there's a sense of being in the now, in impatience of the now, and there's something so beautiful about that that I think if you can carry that with you to work, it doesn't matter what you do. If you can kind of not to say you should have fourth on planning at all that stuff, but you got to remembered that the future doesn't matter if you're having a terrible time in the because if your quality of life is measured by the future, you're never going to be happy. Right, and that it to me was kind of a big shift in it was kind of a journey for me to get to that point of yeah, of just comfort and dealing with stressing, just being and I think some of my passion and my motivation comes from that too. Is just this kind of childlike curiosity to live in that moment because I'm just excited to do the thing that I'm whatever I'm doing after this could right. Yeah, I'm excited it. Before this called I was excited to jump into this and it's kind of like you're just living in that moment of doing what you got to do it and then once you get to the next thing, I'll worry about that then. But kind of trusting your intuition, trusting your gust, so pressing your process and the...

...people around you. Yeah, phenomenal answer and yeah, I think that coincides. Is One of the things that I've felt just in the last ten and a half months. And I always appreciate the advice about really appreciating every day because I see I see my son getting older and I'm looking forward to him, you know, walking around and talking and I think it's going to be crazy. But but yeah, I mean it's crazy also right now just to see how big he's gotten there even since last May. But you know, one of the things that it's helped me with a lot is, you know, not necessarily, you know, dwelling on to your point, like what's next and what's in the future, but if he's taken care of and he's got a smile on his face every day, well then today was a great day. Like it's simplified things in a lot of ways. The way I described it is that it's the most complicated way to simplify life and someone's where, you know, it's like everything's harder now, like getting out the house. We're flying tomorrow to to Mexic New Mexico. That I'll be just a huge pain in the butt, but at the end of the day, if he's happy, he's smiling, then I'm happy and everything's good. It's Scott. I really joyed this conversation, man. I really appreciate you taking the time and and sharing your perspective again and I think it's really notable, you know, the level of energy that you bring to your role and, I think, your profession in general. That's something that I'm definitely going to walk away from this conversation remembering and I'll be sure to look you up next time in Toronto. Yeah, I'm sure, thanks, bull be really appreciate the time. This is a lot of fun and yeah, I'm glad we got to finally connect. Absolutely, absolutely all right. It Scott. Thanks for coming on growth marketing camp. All right, cheers. Thanks for listening to growth marketing camp. If you enjoyed this episode, would love it if you would give it a quick five star rating or share it with a friend or colleague looking to give a little more inspiration for their next campaign. If you want to learn more about the company behind the show, had to open sensecom. That's open se en Secom. Will catch you on the next episode.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (60)