Growth Marketing Camp
Growth Marketing Camp

Episode 40 · 8 months ago

Creating Inherent Emotions on LinkedIn With Daniel Murray

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode of Growth Marketing Camp, Daniel Murray, Solutions Consultant at Clearbit and the host of The Marketing Millennials Podcast, shares insights on how marketers can create scroll-stopping content on LinkedIn. What was once known as an overly promotional and stuffy business platform has shifted to one full of emotion, meaningful stories, and authenticity. Daniel shares his tips on how people can make the most of new-age LinkedIn by working their creative muscles and leveraging impactful content to cut through the noise. Tune in and enjoy!

Welcome to growth marketing camp, or we sit down with our favorite marketers to do mystify growth and give you the insights to help turn your next campaign into a major success. Let's get into it. What's up everybody? This is bobby and the rangue host of growth marketing camp. I am so excited today to be joined by Daniel Murray. Daniel is solutions consultant at clear bit. Daniel, welcome to the show. I'm stoked to be on the show. This has been a long time in the running, so I'm excited to be yeah, we're excited to have you today. Want to start just by giving our audience just a little bit of an introduction to yourself. Tell us about the role that you have a clear bit. Yes, for sure, this is actually just like a brand new role. I just recently headed up marking operations a service tight end and I laughed because I wanted to explore new opportunities and clear bit came to me and it's an interesting role because I truly believe in the philosophy of what the purpose of this role is. is to have me to be companies have experts in their their field, helping customers, creating content speaking to language the customers was speaking. So I'm going to be like that marketing opposite voice inside clear bit to help talk the talk of marking out progressionals, create content for them, help them through their journey, help them just figure out like strategy for like their current marketing operations, how it's going to run, like future state, current state, and just help them at about new things and new ideas and what they should be doing. That's awesome. I mean, I think you obviously very familiar with clear BITs, phenomenal company, and it's really neat to understand that that's a strategy that they're going to be looking to deploy. I think there's a ton of space for that in Bob. So that sounds like a really exciting opportunity and you probably the right person for the job. I think. You know, one of the things that I'm eager to chat with you about is you know, when it comes to content, I think you're very much sort of in the realm of content creators. You've got a tremendous social media following, personal brand on Linkedin, as well as you know, your podcast working millennials has a tremendous following as well. I wanted to dig into that a little bit because I'm just genuinely curious about it. How does one go about deciding to and then executing on building personal brand? Can you just tell us a little bit of a story about that, where it all started for you, and what were some of the first dominos to fall that that lead us how we are today? Yeah, it's kind of funny and it's probably not the ant you want to hear. The winning by the way, I started as just genuine curiosity. I just like heard Gary v saying like Linkedin or grant a Greech is crazy, and I wanted to kind of prove it out that it was crazy, like crazy good. So I just say one day just like I think it...

...was like my first post was like a Halloween picture of like me and my people, my company, and it got like four thousand views and to me at that time I was a lot and I was like only had one, two hundred like connections on there and I was like, oh, Jesus is crazy, maybe I should just keep posting. So I just kept posting, posting, just figuring it out, like no reals like strategy with and just figuring out and then I started like seeing like other content creators of what they're doing like in the space I just kind of was looking in. Then I was like, okay, to really grow on social media, I just need to start talking about one thing. I can't be all over the place that night, but all these effort things have to we start very nice. So I was just like, okay, I just want to talk about prove that marketing ops. People know a lot about marketing, so I just going to start talking about marketing every day. So I commend myself to pose. Actually, it was just Monday through Friday at first, every single day, and then it took me like four to six months a just trial and are just like testing what type of content works, testing like what I should do, and Linkedin and then I also started seeing like opportunities come from it. Like I got like people reaching out like do you want to join my podcast? And then I saw I got people reaching out like Oh, like you're doing great stuff when linked and keep it up, like I really get value out of your content. Keep it up, and I just saw like all they like this like feedback that you don't really see in the back end of like what's happening. And then more and more opportunities started opening up just from building a brand. But I didn't go into it saying like, okay, I'm going to build a personal brand to get acts like I wear in the to just test. Yeah, linked in, to be honest, and they it took me that to realize the value of personal brands and on a huge advocate for like building a personal brain, because I think like it will open many, many doors and I could talk more about it, but that's just like the origin story. It's not like I one day decided I want to build a personal brain. Yeah, so you literally just decided to try it out and then there is just a feedback loop there. I am kind of curious. Did you identify certain patterns of the types of posts that seemed to be the ones that that performed really well? I mean, what is it that people are looking to consume on like specifically Linkedin, and I'm just really curious about and if you think about that, this is just more general question. How does that compare to like strategies and other platforms? I mean why are people consuming social media on linked in? Yeah, it's maybe the type of format is different every platforms, but inherently social media people want a couple things things. They want something insightful, something that like raises the eyebrow or like peaks the interest. They want something educational, so something that could teach them...

...something in that and in that. What I would also add is like for be to be contexts, but it's actionable, like someone can go today and like try implement something you're doing. So actuable content and, I think, inspirational, like people want to have an emotion, like convey an emotion, and behind all these posts our emotion to do something. So, like if you have post that convey one of those like three or four things, like they're not all, don't all have to be that topic, but if it has one of those like, it probably will do well. And then it just takes practice of like learning the what the platform likes, what is like, the like the format that you should do. But I inherently like content. People want, like is like something that creates and the inherent emotion where it's like they're happy, they're inspired, it's funny to them, it's entertaining. Yeah, teting's a big one. It's like it has to convey some sort of motion behind the post. And Yeah, that's what I realized. and I realized, like Hey, like linkedin's very good for being educational and inspirational, so let's keep my post around like education, inspirational and actionable content. And over time I just got better at writing post and it's my post is switched up over time, but like it, over time I got better at writing posts. I just think it's incredible how insightful that that response is. I think it definitely demonstrates level of acumen and understanding of what it is that you're actually doing. I mean, did you have guidance into this before you started? It sounds of strictly curiosity driven and that you've just been sort of learning and executing. Yeah, I tell me about that. It's a little of the marketing ops and me. Okay, but I think, like I anything anything you learn, like if you if you take the best what they're doing and just like reverse engineer what they're doing on the platform, you could pretty much figure out and just in debate on the wheel, from that you could pretty much figure out what to do. What I did is like I just watch like the top ten people in the space like what they were doing every single day. I can even showed up in every single post I I saw, like I saw the patterns that they were doing. I just reverse engineer what they were doing and I was like, okay, this works, like let's see how I could do this with my own spin. So, like it's really like a lot of people go out and say, like I just need to try something knew, I need to be different. But really, like if you take if you figure out why something's working and you just reverse engineer like the steps that took to to work, like it's pretty you could pretty much easily figure out like how it works. It just a lot of trial or to figure out like what works for you. And it doesn't match. Every person won't match the same, but pretty much there's underlying...

...principles that will be the same. I want to ask you about that because I often hear content creators, are recontent creators on Linkedin who will comment on the Linkedin Algorithm, and my question is it's not so much what's the Linkedin Algorithm, it's it's the algorithm in the platform, or is the algorithm in the audience, the people who are actually consuming it? How would you sort of think about that? I have a head. There is stuff to like mess with, non mess without and but made your post do better, obviously, and that's just like how like platforms work, like this growth type content on platform. And what the content? You just got to figure out what that platform needs. But inherently, like it's good content, like rises to the top, like once you do that. And also, like if you build an audience, like every say, your audience start set like a hundred and then like ten of those people come back every single day, like and then the net you, it starts growing. It's just the biggest thing that I always say is like and people just don't do this. I just give up too early. As just be consistent every single day, and then people will know that your you're showing up. Like for me, like some of my post aren't that good, but I'm top of mine all the time and I get comments all the time, like I see you all over social media, and it's just because I post every day. Yeah, I, like I don't do anything in special like I just post every single day. That's why I'm top of mine. I love the analogy of like I want to get in shape for running, but I run like once a month, like are you not going to get shaped for running? But if you run three times a week and you're consistent with it, you'll get in shape over time and then if you pick it up and learn how to do it like effectively, then like figure out like like how to train better and how to do that, you'll be with just same thing with lifting, like over time you'll build be in shape, but you can just say like Oh, I go work out once a month or I'll take three months off and I'll come back like to try take three months off and go run again like your feel out of shape. That's the same thing with content. Like you take thing unless, like you're super creator and you built a millions of following and you come back and be like hey, I'm back, like yeah, that will be the B yeah, if you're not that and you're starting out, it's not going to work. Sounds like you're talking about my work out scheduled day. Also. Thanks for that. That's really interesting and that's actually something that I've heard consistently as just you gotta stay consistent. So that actually press another question, and if this is too much detail, just just tell me. But creative process wise, I mean is this something that you've blocked off, like, Hey, get my cup of calls in the morning I'm going to sit the laptop and sit the size thinking about posts. Like the night befoward. You have a list of things that you think are great ideas. I guess just, I mean, if you don't mind just again pulling the the curtains, like what's the process for you? I'm a true believer that you have...

...to consume great content to produce great content. A lot of my ideas come from like conversations, books, podcast other people's social media and I just like swipe all them and write them down and take notes on them and then when I'm ready to write the post, I'll go look through my notes and be like, okay, this was a cool like ideas, a cool thought, or like when I'm working and I think out something I want to write, like I will just like jot it down in that moment, because otherwise I'll forget it and then I don't have as a great as like a system. It's like some like Justin wild shows, like a really systemized content writing like system. Like I do write post ahead of time. been like I also do, like if there's a post that comes in the mind and I want to post it the in that moment, I'll do that too. So it's like there's not really but I would helps me is that I've already consumed a lot and everdy documented a lot of things that are happening. So I can go back to my like inspiration bank, or swipe file as people call it, and I'll go and be like okay, it, here's a cool idea. I could turn this into like a post that I want to write about with my own spend. So I think the whole thing is like you have to be consuming good stuff all the time to be able to and I notice is like when I'm not consuming like good stuff, like my creation goes down, to my ideas go down and stuff like that's you have to keep like putting good inputs. Like one of my friends, Alan Gannett, wrote a book about creativity and he says that like you need like the dots to be able to connect the dots, like every good idea constant connecting the dots. And he was talking about he talked about the person, the founder of Netflix, how he when he was a young kid, he would work at a video store and he's break, you would watch movies all day. Like he had the dots to connect before, like he be starting Netflix, like, like I think talk about Beit Dovin also, like like came from a gay, very musical family. So like he had music, so he had inherently, he had dots to connect before. So if you're not consuming, it's going to be way harder to produce content. So, like I would set time a sad to consume some sort of content. And consuming doesn't mean only reading books. Could be podcast, it could be having conversations. Like one of my ways is my pod guys. Like that's one way I get inspirate totally. So, yeah, consuming is the biggest, like I opening thing for me. And then it's just like you have to like heat right, right, like and you have to just like write things down, because about it, like writing just shows how bad your thoughts are. But then you can go like clean up your thoughts. But if one if you don't put it down in that moment, it's probably going to be forgotten. Totally, totally a couple of really awesome ideas there. I you know, I like in the connecting the dots to like the Big Bang, right, you know, the there was just this massive matter and you got to have that there...

...to be the the building blocks for what ends up being, you know, planets, right. I mean, ultimately that's that's all we are. And then the other thing that kind of comes to mind, you know, in that vein, is I feel like sometimes like I'll be taking a shower. I know there's like a reddit called shower thoughts, like the infamous shower thoughts, and you feel like you're having such an incredible idea and I think like a lot of times ideas are really just an amalgamation of again, those thoughts that, whether consciously or subconsciously, you've consumed and it almost comes out like like it almost sometimes I and again, maybe this is just a self preservation idea, but a lot of my ideas that I think are original, I don't think are actually original, and it's there's no original thought. People think their original, but it's really what they did is taking to obsolete ideas and connecting them exactly. Exactly. Yeah, it's just the realistic nature of the fact that there's seven billion people on this planet right now and and hundreds of billions more that have ever lived. And so you know, everything that we're saying, it's probably not original. It's probably been done before, it's probably been said before. So it's just interesting. You bring up writing and I love the way that you describe you know, you jot it down and they maybe do a once over. I write my sales emails that way a lot of times. It's just, you know, get the idea out there, going edit it, make it concise whatever. But like, can you speak to the writing as a skill, I mean a do you see it as something that like, I don't know, are we losing some of that? And in modern date age, is that something that you still think is pretty prevalent? And be like do you think it's important, like whether it's personal brand building or even just in the context of be Ab, which something I want to talk to you about and just a moment. I don't think you need to like like ride by hand, like I'd a lot of people say you wouldn't remember your notes and stuff like that, and I do sure it's sometimes, but like you don't always have like when you go full walks and like would you say like the shower thoughts or like ga talks and stuff like that? Yeah, some of your best ideas come from that. So you've got to jot it down when you doing that, but I think like what writing helps you do is like well, there's a couple things that I'd say. I think it helps you like clear up your thoughts and make them like into something that's like more like formulated and like something that you can like speak to, because sometimes you just bob stuff up and it's like not a concise doog. I think also, learning how to like use tips and train eggs to like move people to do something is like a life skill that everybody, like Dave Gearhard, like is one of my good buddies, but he always talks about copywriting and from for me, like I'm not, I went in the best copywriter, but I do know that like principles, like you need to learn how to write the first sentence very well, like I need to have short, choppy sent to the you need to like write how you talk, to be be more personal, and like sometimes personalization is just you talking...

...like and you're writing is like how you talk, like that's personal, like some people people in personalization is as like you're in the email space. But yeah, was like personalization is just like saying hey whatever. But yes, ization, my friend, like if you're saying an email to a thousand people, personalization could just be like you being personal and that they hear your voice and a personalization. So like learning how to do that is such a life skill and like learning how to do that, and I think for any position, like learning how to ride well or like speak well, like will help you. And obviously I need to get the speaking well better, because that my brain goes. A hunter was our bed. I definitely think like writing better has helped me think better, and then it also helps me, like when I'm writing to teach people now, like which I'm not. I don't feel like I'm a teacher, but I like when you putting things down trying to teach someone, that it helps you think deeper about the topic and about that also. So I think writing is a hundred percent like a skill that a lot of people don't work enough fun, and the problem is that they don't. In school they teach you like five paragraph essays and MLA format it, and writing to me is like learning how to say something in the simple, concise manner, and concise could mean two pages, but it's trimming down, like the flow and correct, putting in your own stuff correct. It's like that class just taught me how to get really good at doing two and a half line space, fourteen point, five, point thought or whatever. But the thing that you said there that I think is just such a great point is imagine starting an email to a thousand people and the first line says hi everyone, and being able to have that still be considered a personalized message because the writing is personal, that all thousand people in that to field like know who you are because of the way that you were able to communicate to them. That is so counter to today's perception or understanding of personalized messages where you'll get blown up on linkedin if it's if you sent an email out that said hi everything, O high and then it's quickly, squigly, first dot, name or whatever. Right like. It's just an interesting concept that personalization in right doesn't mean you're sending it to an individual. It's that can you come through, can your personality, can you as a person be communicated through your own words? Yeah, I mean they're not listening to you. It's could be as simple as being like hey everyone, like a lot of people do this. I'm sitting here in a coffee shop writing this email that needs to be out at seven am tomorrow. Mornings and people have the motion that connects you to you as a human being, not a company. And this is what drifted. Well, this is what a lot of good copylight, if you read, like good some good nudes letters. They bring like there,...

...oh, Hey, I'm doing x, Y and Z, and there is like a person behind the email and it doesn't have to. It feels like it's written for you because order to human behind it, because you you just putting in little details of like who you are instead of like writing in the format. So I could like personalization just as that. And you don't see that in many like be to be you guys and stuff like that. You don't see like Hey, I'm like work from home was great. I'm in Vermont. I'm this person behind this like email sending it to you. I'm the email marketing manager at x company. I just want to know you'll be just let you know I'm going to be sending an email once a week to you. Like doesn't go in this journey together like this. Something just, something simple, of like having a person behind the email. It will be like not a company that could just cracked. That's personalization. Yeah, they're like it's a great point that like giving a brand of voice can be by literally, like using a person to give that brand voice. So great idea and a lot again, to think about and and I'm very much with you, though, in terms of like consuming content, like being able to have conversations with you and others that I've had the opportunity interviewers, like one of my great sort of like life acts right now to be able to learn. So I very much appreciate and set your share so far. I want to kind of pivot a little bit into be to be that's an area that I'm particularly interested in. Can you talk to me a little bit about how some of your efforts, you know, and some of the work that you've done and what you've been able to build, how does that compliment your profession? Like how our companies able to are they able to, like take advantage of their employees personal brands? And, if not, what are some of the strategies that brands, like companies, should be taking in social media that maybe leverage some of the principles that you've used to build your bread yeah, that's a great question. I think there's is numerous different like way stand so that in there's numero different like benefits like, for example, like service tied in. It might have not benefited the audience because the audience it service tied and were like plumbers and electricians and stuff like that. But I can name like how many people like came in the referral system, for like in new employees, because they said they saw me like being and Mary posting, and it's from like service tight end. So like, for like employer brand, it's a big deal, like but, for example, like why Gong works and stuff like that. They're their audience of sales and marketing people. So it makes total sense that sales and marketing people are talking and it shows authority of that company. It shows expertise, it shows like Gong knows as it puts like a personality behind Gong, like there's actually real people they're and that works for them. So that's another approach where it's like you're the people talking. And then I also am strongly like in this new concept of companies hiring...

...an expert in the their field to be creating, being a content creator for that company, for example, like if your audience is email marketers, for example, like having an email marketer on your team as like the content person like writing content about email, marketing and high it's just brings expertise, your brand and know how and people want to work with you because you are this authority, people figure. But I also think personal it empowers your employees to like have a voice, like know that you're supporting them, knowing you supporting their growth, like I think that's another great effect of it, like you're behind their growth, you're supporting whatever they do. You're the personal brand is something that you're out there to support and because personal brand to me, is like reputation. At the end of the day, you want to give you employees the ability to have a reputation where, like for me, like I think is just person brand. He's like networking at scale, like it's a easy way to network. So having a person brand can get them opportunities to meet other people so they get better at their job. That's what I do. Like I met a bunch of markers and I talked to him all the time and I'm better at my job. It helps them grow in their career. It helps them if they want to eventually, at that time, like go to like start a business, for example, they could do that. There's so many opportunities of that. But I a lot of employers are scared that their employees will lead. But if you're paying your employees well and you're a good culture, they they'll stay. So like, yeah, people who were worried about that probably have bad culture. Yeah, yeah, yeah, but there's so many benefits. I just think like just a little thing of like me posting and Linkedin and it's marking opposite service tied and gives. I got last year twenty one million impressions on my things, a service time technique. God partially a lot of those impressions like Sidebar, and some of them were actually in the audience of service tied and it didn't not all of them, but like that's why gone works. That's why I like Martech. People in Martech should be doing it, people in sales tag should be doing it. People who audience are on that platform. But if your audience isn't that platform, you could just go great content on platforms that your audience or stall. But if you hire like a Palmeralist, say because your audience is plumbers, and plumbers like spend more time on facebook or there on Youtube. You create a youtube channel or a facebook group for them. And you make that person create content there. You just got to go where your audience and they that's why the person having strong personal brands like and company a lot to think about over there with that. I mean, I know that's something that that my company historically we haven't done, but I can totally see the advantage. I mean, you know, you brought up Gong and one of the things I think about when you tell it, when you say that, is that,...

...like how many BB brands are they're out there where we could, all of us in that sort of universe, name, you know, a couple of their employees just because of their personal brands and their social media presence, like I can name Sarah Brasier, Devin read, took my tongue like. That's that's because they've done that and that's a great benefit, I would imagine, to Gong and something that I think their competition probably lacks, and so I think that's a that's a phenomenal example. I want to be cognizit of our time today and I would be remiss if we didn't sort of pivot the conversation to give our audience a little bit of an example of you know, we typically will talk about a campaign, but I wanted to use as an opportunity to talk to you a little about the marketing millennials podcast, because it's just in talking to it sounds like there's some curiosity that was explored there as well. It's some insights that were lean through experimentation there too. Can you tell our audience a little bit about some of the the high level insight that you cleaned as a pertains to marketing millennials? And we can dig into some of the details in just a moment. But but what's sort of like one of the big takeaways of your experience and building that presence on Linkedin? Yeah, I think then the number one takeaway is just like how much wide space there is out there for B tob companies to be better at social media and how much competitive adventage you have if you're good at social media, if you're a BB company. so that I google. It's a bigger what big take away? And also just like on the side of how much a podcast could help create a lot of content, like it's just like podcasts are not only there for that, like to get your target customer on there and get your audience listening to but it's also there to be able to create content for your content team and for your sales team, and there's all those people. So those are two the bit. The main big insight is, just like we talked about before, this is I think there's so much opportunity for B tob companies to be better at social media. Just there's so much opportunity there and it's just I think there's like this robe block and best practices that were out there for a long time that it's just like share your Webinar, share what your company cultures and bubble and you can share a little bit of that. But I think like if you're going to have a social media presence, like there's two ways you could go about it. It could be a place where future employees go to like check out, but if you want to make it as a place where like your audience is going to come back like and want to learn about something or want to be educated, and you, being authority figure in the market, having a strong social media presence is like crucial because that's where people are hanging out. Like your audience is hang out. Most people spend time on social media, like I don't know who doesn't, like, yeah, and so your audience is probably hang out there and a lot of betb companies aren't doing well. They just thinking like paid ads and stuff...

...like that are going to be like get them where they are. But if you have a good organic presence, like it's a huge benefit. And you're talking specifically about like literally a company page something in not just sort of like a Collie or employees page, but like straight up like the actual company page on like then yes, what are some examples of companies that you're seeing do the really good job and what are some of the things that they're doing that maybe sort of sething apart? I think we talked to all this earlier. Big gongs doing a good job. I think they show that they're like authority figure. They don't just be like hey, check on my new Webinar and hey, this is this. They should actually should like sales content on there and content to be better at your job and actionable and insideful, and Devin read is done their good job as the content person there. I think drift was doing a very good job of this. I think they fell off a little bit, but like they were doing a very good job of doing this. And but the problem is like the fact that I can't even like think about a lot of these is the problem. Why? It's like why they should be more companies doing this, because it is a huge advantage if, if you do it, because I don't think a lot of people are taking advantage of making a great company bay. Yeah, it sounds like there's probably a ton of opportunity there. If I'm if I'm a chief marketing officer or deep marketing operations, like, what are some of the primary objectives or key tenets to a social media strategy as it pertains our company pagents, I should be thinking about. Yeah, I think the reason why a lot of people don't do it is because it inherently doesn't like drive demand right now, like, and that's like a lot of the objections of like building social media. It's like, Oh, I can't link this to Roi and Shoh, Blah, blah, blah, Blah Blah. And but I to be honest, a lot of things are happening in dark social right now, like I think a lot of things are happening where people are sending screenshots of posts to in slack messages and in tax messages and a lot of B to be buying happens in on social media and WHATSAPP and DM's and stuff like that, and it's conversations. That why people are having it. So every BPA, marktars it should have a brand project. But I think this also drives demand in the long time and you have to stick with it and be patient to see the results of it. But I think that having a brand ultimately in this crowded space is one of the biggest COMBETTA advantages because if you get for everybody or company, not only like marketing but like sales and st are getting on a call to say hey, I'm someone from ex company, and they like who like, it's harder call. But if you say hey, I'm Daniel from gone lay the bay, Oh gone, cool, I have a conversation with your it marketing is meeting your customer where they are right now, and I think that's the beauty about social media. And it might not be a linkedin...

...page because your audience and might not be in there. But it could be instagram, it could be twitter, it could be tick tock, it could be youtube, it could be it could be read at, it could be corp there. You need to find where your audience it's spending the most time, and that's comes from like knowing your audience and then creating content on those platforms so they can consume it. And when I would mean creating content, I mean cream content that we talked about the same way in the person being educational, inspiray should know, entertaining, like something that will they want to come in consumer, we did, and make you seem as the authority figure. Yeah, this reminds me of a conversation I tended to Demandgen meet appear in San Francisco a couple of years back now, and it was a phenomenal conversation about channel attribution and there's a panel of demand jend professionals that were talking about how you want to optimize your channels, you want to understand, you know, what types of deals come in through that channel, what type of deals are spit out from that channel. And the funny thing was was one of the speakers there was for a company Medalia, and Medallia had at time a massive billboard on the one hundred and one, and one of the audience members very keenly sort of raise their head and said, hey, they I appreciate all this conversation today about Roy and attribution, but y'all have a billboard one hundred and one that goes totally counter to what you're talking about, and I think that the main insight that we got from that was that in order for demand gend to work, there has to be brand awareness, and brand awareness is not always going to be something that you measure. But to your point, like that phone call from that SDR when they call a, you know, customer success VP in San Francisco. Hey, I'm bobby from MEDALLIA. Oh Yeah, the sign I saw on the highway on my way to the office today. Same thing with social media. It's it may not have like a attribution or Roy or whatever, but like, if your demand activities are to be successful, they're going to be way more successful if the people that you're driving demand from like have that awareness. And there nay. And the funny thing about attribution, and I'm a marketing I was person, is a lot of tying. Attribution is measured at the point of when there's intent to buy and the point of great marketing knows that like to win, and marketing you go to win. You there's capturing existing demand in the market, which is what demandon is and then there's demand. Just job also to educate and create demand correct in the market. So I think that a lot of marking attribution gets missed, lad, because like that first interaction with the brand is not captured in the their last touch, yes, in in the crm. More the first capture of like someone seeing a sing on social media and...

...sending it to a friend, like does inherently how people buy today. Is like most be to be buyers, at least that I know of. Like, and I'm a marking ous person, is like I heard it from a friend or asked a friend if it's good. Yeah, or I saw a lot of people talking about it on social media, and then I'll go, like after that point, then I'll go and do a little research and go to their website. Yeah, and then I'll get retargeted interacted over, but like my original, like you got to get the original capture before and get them in the mind before that. And that happens before and Chris Walkers as well. It's like you need to like win before Google, like one before they get to Google, and that's like, well, a lot of companies aren't doing is they capturing existing demand and then lack good because they capturing the search when someone needs something. But this also been part of marketing, is creating a bloody creating that need that I just know that they actually needed exactly. Yeah, that's something I can I can very much understand. Daniel, this has been one of the best conversations about I think you're incredibly insightful, professional individual. I've personally had a great pleasure and chatting with you today. I hope we can chat again because I know I've learned a lot just in the last forty five minutes and I'm sure audience will to. I can't wait to get this podcast out and get some of that content out as well, because I think there's some really, really good stuff in this. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you for having me. It's been awesome. Thanks for listening to growth marketing camp. If you enjoyed this episode, would love it if you would give it a quick five star rating or share it with a friend or colleague looking to give a little more inspiration for their next campaign. You want to learn more about the company behind the show, had to open sensecom. That's open Sean Secom. Will catch you on the next episode.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (69)