Growth Marketing Camp
Growth Marketing Camp

Episode 23 · 11 months ago

This Employee Evangelist Program Grabbed Nearly 1Million Views on LinkedIn

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Sweet Fish Media has shared podcasting & marketing expertise on LinkedIn for years, but recently they formalized a program to get even more eyeballs on their content while also helping their team members build personal brands. Dan Sanchez, Director of Audience Growth joins Emily DiBrito, Social Media Writer to break down how the program is structured in this must-listen episode. If you’re trying to start an employee evangelist program or you’ve tried and failed at LinkedIn posting for yourself, you’ll want to take notes.

Welcome to growth marketing camp, where we sit down with our favorite marketers to D mystify growth and give you the insights to help turn your next campaign into a major success. Let's get into it, all right. Welcome everybody back to growth marketing camp. Super excited to be joined by Dan Sanchez and emily debrito from sweet fish media, one of our favorite companies here. It open sense and friends of the brand. Dan is the director of audience growth there at sweet fish and you've probably seen him under linkedin feed. Let's be honest, he's somewhere. You're following him, you've seen his post. Emily, relatively new to the team, is the fully dedicated social media writer whose role I'm just dying to get more insights on. We're definitely going to talk about that today. So, Dan and Emily, welcome and thank you so much for joining. Thanks for having sex. Yeah, it's good to be here. So we had James Carbury, your CEO, on the show previously, one of our first episodes, to talk about how your team was leveraging Linkedin's organic reach on personal profiles, because we all know targetings incredible and linkedin that's kind of like the gold standard of it's like the old facebook days of we can kind of go down to like a single person with who we target on Linkedin from an ads perspective, but how do we get reach? And it's so expensive and how do we make sure that we're really hitting the right people with the right kind of thing, because people are just kind of blind ads today. I think James had this really interesting concept of okay, well, let's just use the people fulls profiles. This is where we're getting a lot of organic reach and there were some early success right away. I mean this is kind of sweetish. Is always been a brand that shares things on social it talks a lot about what's happening on their social media feeds. Emily, as the new person on the team and speaking to social media, did that draw you to the company? What was it about the role that you felt like, Oh, this is the perfect fit for me. So I actually been working for them as a contract writer for about a year. Nice writing. Yeah, I was writing for customers and then I dabbled a little bit in writing for social media. Okay, yeah, I think I was like the the team Dabbler. Like I talked to James and Dan and wrote just a couple of things for them and then Dan reached out to me and was like hey, we'd love to create a full time role for you here, and I was really excited about that because I was excited to like take ownership with this and was seeing some results from just the little bit that we have been doing, and so I'm pumping, like you know how we can just grow that even more. Yeah, and how long ago did you officially formally launch, you know, your full time role, but also the program? I guess where they in conjunction or were they just kind of the leadership team? had been like Jane Slogan Dan. They had been doing this for, I mean years, and then I'm Dan can speak more to that. I'm not sure how long because I was before me, but I came on in May and when I came on we decided to open it up to everyone on the team who wanted to do it, and so I sort of I think we really started going hard in June for some people and then July I was like start of the quarter, like we're gonna just go all in like get everyone on, and so that's what really a lot more of this stuff then, a lot more, yeah, because we require that our rangelists are posting consistently for a month before I jump on and help them. So we had a time like posting in June and then now that the quarters started, I'm gonna going to be doing even more content for them. So that's amazing. Well, that's that's great to hear. Dan. Maybe you can speak to how you got to this point of it sounds like you know the team's not enormous. You don't have fivezero employees. To hire a full time social media writer to take her from contract work the full time is a big step and obviously major investment in kind of the growth of this channel for your team. What was the impetus? What created that? Like Yep, it's time, it's a the program started because the pandemic and kind of killed one of our former products. We were launching our own shows and essentially building them up and reselling space on them as cohost. Instead of paying US Fivezero a month to launch your own show, you could pay two thousand a month to be a...

...cohost on a show and get a lot of the benefits of it. That have lots of people cross promoting to show from different noncompetitive spaces, but reaching a similar audience. That was a whole product we had and then died in the pandemic that but we had already hired people to help us execute this thing. James was like, Oh crap, like this is going away and he's like let's just do it internally. And then that's what became the evangelist program. We had emily wellman and to some degree, Emily de Brito doing a lot of contract were doing that kind of stuff, writing the linked to post writing, the blood post coming out of these shows, and then we just focused it on our own team. Kind of the first iteration of the evangelist program was just leadership, the leadership team within sweetfish. We had about twenty employees. Then probably like, I don't know, about seven of us on the leadership team and a couple of US took to it. I was one of those early ones and that's where I didn't even really know how to do linkedin when it first started. James is like here's the ropes, there's how you do it. is how you write a good post and what I would do. And then I was listening to just like Justin Welsh and Chris Walker at the time kind of giving their two cents and then I really hit the ground running and pushed hard, which got Logan going and James is already doing it hard. So it kind of be game the three of us. Emily de Brito was writing about like a third of my post and I just pulled up the stats I wrote. I guess in the last year I've had six hundred and fourteen posts just for my personal profile. It's a lot of posts. But yeah, emily, it was writing about a third of those throughout the last year and it was just so successful. I got a lot of reach and there was a synergy between all of us doing it at once, between James, Logan and I, and of course we had a bill and Kelsey kind of in the mix too. There were posting some every once in a while, but not as quite as regularly. Yeah, but there's we found there was so much synergy between just multiple people posting and going at it because you could like play off each other, you could comment on each other stuff, you could tag each other and it was better than just going in a on from one profile. So now we're like, okay, this clearly worked. It's earned a ton of annual recurring revenue and we look at our source like file and hub spot, it's like Linkedin's like three times the next biggest source. So and of course it works to promote BB growth as well. So that's where we had. I was like watching Emily Debrito here like writing so many awesome posts. Sometimes some of the best hit posts for coming from emily. So I'm like, I need to get her on full time. She's just a contractor right now. I can't let that talent go. Yeah, yeah, I know you had a gem. Clearly. Well, that's awesome because when we talk to James, this is a few months ago. The revenue picture was already clear, there was already attribution, it was already obviously Lincoln was a winning channel Linkedin Organic, which is just amazing. But it seems that in recent days, as you know, as you brought on emily, full time is looped in more of the team. There's been a very formalized structure to it. So I'll run through some of the stats of James or Cityo shared on Linkedin, but it's pretty inspiring. This is really cool. He talks about how last quarter you all had about six hundred and fifty eight thousand organic views, which is already. I mean, wow, great, wonderful. I mean it's not a team again of tenzero employees where all you have to do is post in the company slack. Everybody go like this, you're getting those us because you're earning them. But in the previous course, so qt nine hundred and thirty seven thousand views. So you're growing nearly fifty percent there, which is an amazing leap in just three months. That's it's huge boost. And you know it looks like then you went on to formalize and bring in more team members, who are now looks, like James said, fourteen evangelist which is just under half of the full time team. So many questions around this. Who owns the responsibility currently of bringing people in talking about the program Emily, are you focused on writing and Dan you're bringing people to the program or how do you guys balance that out the program but emily's really the one executing a lot of it. So people raise your hands and then emily meets with them. Oh Awesome, okay, emily, what does that look like when you first meet with them? What are you looking for? Yeah, so when I first meet with them, I'm looking to figure out their content tames for them so they can hone in on what they want to be talking about, what their expertise is, what they're learning about, and then also for me to be able to produce content for...

...them. But a big part of the program is helping them build their personal brands, and so Dan's done a really good job of like creating training for that internally, and then they kind of go through they watch these videos about how to make great content on Linkedin and then I hop on a call with them and I talked about more personal things, about like how do you want position yourself? Who like? Who Are you? What do you love, what are you passionate about, and we kind of just dig into those things so that they get a clear idea of their brands and of what they want to write about. That's fascinating. So, Dan, you kind of leading this charge. You've got to have a certain degree, like a pretty high degree of faith and confidence that whatever they determine with emily is going to be sufficient to support the sweet fish program like that there's something that's going to lead back to positive returns for sweetfish, or are you looking at that totally differently? In my wrong we used to try to think of, like I member. Even a year ago, James and I were talking like, Oh, what percentage should be about sweetfish, about podcasting, versus their own thing? And over time I just found like, if you're all working at a podcasting company, naturally you just get to talk about podcasting, right. So why even make it a requirement? Just find your topic and post about it. Naturally a lot of it ends up being about podcasting because they're thinking about it a lot, so sure, and they're developing an expertise in it. So if your producer, you're like, you already know so much about podcasting that it's just going to come out naturally. And if one doesn't, then that's okay. If they have their own little thing, like we have a rob Conlin who has his own podcast before he even joined sweet fish, recruiting hell, and I'm like, dude, promote the crap out of that like you should like. And Emily's probably certain to write about that topic already for him, about job hunting and stuff like that, and I think, I think it'll work and pan out. The only thing we ask really is that they change their by line to have our positioning statement in it. We produced try aster bed brands. So that's pretty consistent. Every time they post, every time they comments, like a little ad floating around for sweetish media and then don't a difference. But that's probably the only like real strict thing that we're about that we make. That's awesome. So you're definitely getting some of that impression juice, you know, when you have the profile views and people are seeing the post and they're seeing that the tagline. That makes a lot of sense and I like that you've adopted that approach rather than what percentage do we need to have be about our specific show or about podcasting? Now, Emily, I imagine you've got a really coach people, though, in picking the right topics and not so much in topics that they you know, like hey, you probably don't care about this as much, but we need you to talk about it, but more in line with hey, ment love ten things, but talking about puppies on the show is are, you know, on Linkedin is just not going to cut it. How do you help them pick those topics and kind of what does that process look like? Yeah, so there are two questions that I really year in on, and the first is what are you already an expert in because I think there are some of the evangelists who join the program and they want to grow their brand and they want to learn more, but they don't feel confident about their knowledge. Right it's sort of this like imposter syndrome, and they do it every day. So the work they do every day they're just not confident enough to be able to say, like this is how you do something. So we dive into what they're already an expert in and what their experience has been, and then I also like to ask them what are they satiably curious about right now, like what are they learning? And so that way they can have content from a place of experience and expertise, but they can also post content from a place of like a student perspective, like this is what I'm learning right now, and that way they can also get some really good feedback from their connections as well to help them grow and learn, because everyone is an expert in something. You know you're close to the job, like you're a podcast producer, whereas someone else works in the marketing room, but they I don't know. They're like me and they're a writer, and so I don't know what that's like and I'd love to learn about that, just peel back the layers. So those are two things, I think, that are really key to forming your content strategy. But then also, like I do, encourage them to put some of their their own personal passions in there as well, like obviously not going to write a whole post about puppies if you look puppies, but if you want to, I don't know, make a meme that's got a...

...puppy in it that has yeah, market day, or you know, there's this little nuances that you can use. That's awesome. I like how you're balancing that. And for a long time you'll have done that. You've had graphics that have kind of like a funny tag to them, like something that is relatable and funny, and I always enjoy seeing them. But I remember a long time ago James mentioning that you had a team members helping with that. was that Emily's that somebody else who on the team is helping with the graphics? So I'm responsible for kind of ideating those. Yeah, and then emily woman will design them. Very nice. Okay, cool, so there's kind of the graphics and the writing combine a little bit. Yeah, Nice, my design capabilities are not amazing that I need help in that area. But re I do help with those. And when you think about creating the content for Evangelis, it sounds like you had a very specific way of looking at this, like hey, they have to already be creating content for a month without me. Can you talk us through that process a little bit? Sure. So that is really just to prove that they're committed to the program, that they're going to keep doing it. It also is just flexing that writing muscle right. So then more that they do it, the more comfortable they'll doing it. And for me it really helps to learn what they're passionate about, to learn how they speak. So I will audit their profile, do a deep dive and so their past posts and just see like how does this person talk and what are they talking about? So it's helpful to them to be creating consistent content, but it's also helpful to me as well. Do you have you had any dropoff from folks who raise their hand and said yes, I really want to be a part of the program and then they were like I just don't have the time or the interest or the will to then go post consistently for a month. Yeah, I think it's so new right now that everyone's super excited about it, so we haven't really experienced that yet. The people who raise their hand are like fully raising both hands and ready to go. That's awesome. I imagine we will. I try to set up the program in such a way that you make a quarterly commitment, okay, and you could take a pause for a quarter before. Like his other things, we hook evangelist stub like we pay for their shield account so we can kind of track to see how all the programs doing together. That way they could track to see how well they're doing for week to week and shield and then we can see collectively as a team. Everybody can see everybody else in data. So that's kind of Nice. But obviously I don't want to keep paying for another shield license that they're not going to be in a program. So I try to get it's like commit to quarter posting at least three times. I'm not going to police it real heavily, but if it's pretty obvious, like you haven't posted from multiple weeks and have don't plan to, we're going to reach out and see what we can do to get you back on track. But I get it, like life, events happen, things go so if they want to push pause, that's fine or talk about exiting the program. All I ask is that they write a good amount. We don't want to just write content for them. If you only write content for them, and kind of like if they just open up their accounts to us, their post will never get seen because if they're not have some skin in the game and right themselves, then they won't be logging in, they won't be interacting with their comments and they won't be interacting with other peeople, which you know, you have to have all that engagement to get your posting. So if you're just posting and syndicating content, it's kind of like, well then they're just not going to be seen by anybody. I'm just going to say, like that's a key point as well as not only are they're posting, but they're engaging with other people on Linkedin, and so that's a requirement that we have. I say that loosely because, like Dan said, we're not policing it, but it helps them to have more engagement and it also helps, like it helps me to read those comments and to see, like this is how rob comments on things and what he thinks about this particular thing, and so that's a really, really helpful part of the program as well. It's just, yes, be posting consistently, but also like take ten minutes every morning and comment on other people's posts as well. And I think like within the group we have this sort of like Fomo of like, Oh, I don't want to miss out on I love commenting on our team stuff because it's citing and it's a fun conversation, and then taking that and then commenting on other things as well. But I think it's just it's a cool thing to feel like we're in this together. You know, are you...

...commenting on your own posts a lot in line. I just realize that if you're writing a lot of people's comments and you're going to leave writing, you're actually reading your own post and then you commented that's a great idea, so good did you write? That's amazing. I do that a lot. Yo. Well, what's fun about that is it makes more scalable their own actual perspective and personality. What you're not doing is handing them a bunch of like prebuilt Hey, dump this into your feed, or hey, you know, we'll just preschedule this thing. We've got a tool that can handle this. Don't even worry about it. You're really trying to draw out the person and what they care about, what they like, and emily, it seems like you're just adding fuel to the fire. You're not like wholesale giving them this thing and saying, Hey, just give me your logins, I'll take care of this for you. Dan, your point about the comments are where we get more views. It's also we get the most benefit right as a writer, as the person who has, you know, had their voice heard. It's where you learn the most about the people that you're connected with, where you find the most people to go connect with. I mean one of my favorite things is connect with people with comments on a post and say hey, I appreciate your thoughtful comment like that. We ought to connect, and I've had great business opportunities, great connections and just great friends made through that sort of activity. So it makes sense that you can't just hand them something, dump it off and say, you know, will just preschedule this and run. You really got to get them bought into the program. Yeah, even with custom content that's crafted for them, yeah, not enough. You actually have to go in and be social. It's social media, son of a gun. Yeah, they got that social and there you got to do it well. How do you determine success, Dan, like, when you think about this program it's, you know, kind of its early days as a formal got a half of your team, four team members, on doing this program. Now, how do you determine? Hey, this was a huge hit. You know, this was how we got a tailor. This a little bit of a wholesale. We got to abandon this. I don't imagine you'll ever be in the abandon this phase because you've already proven out so much of the concept. But how do you determine when it's working? There's a couple different ways to look at it. Ultimately it has to map back to revenue for sweetfish. So we do look at total views, total comments. I'm not going after anybody for getting more or less views, but it is something I'm tracking qualistically for the program right so it's something I'll log into shield and just kind of look at the total views, total comments to make sure that's going well, because I know if we're getting the views and we're getting that conversation going, people are going to show up on the website, they're going to show up a DM's and ultimately they're going to show up as new customers, and we can track that up spot because we just ask people like hey, would you first hear about us? Sometimes it's organic search was a recent one that came up and I was like yeah, because we're blocking to, but oftentimes it's Linkedin. People remember that, Oh yeah, I first discovered James or Dan or Logan, and soon one of the other team members will will start hearing their names come up. And it's not we don't map at to team member, but we are mapping at to linkedin regularly to keep track of that. So that's one avenue we're making sure it works for sweet fish. I'm also want to heavily make sure that it works for the the evangelists. Are they happy with it? Are they growing? Are they getting something out of it that is tangible, that they get to take it them when they leave sweetfish, which I'm just like praying, like man, I wouldn't it be sweet as sweetfish became the place that launched so many awesome people. Yeah, we became the like thought leader, like the influencerm creating machine right, and so many people got their start because they started as an employee at sweetfish media. That would just be amazing. Like, I don't worry about people leaving. It's it helps when you start to have lots of people on but if somebody leaves here and somebody leaves there and they go off and do awesome stuff with the brands they've felt, that would just be a dream come true to be able to watch people like launch their careers out of a place like sweetfish. It's going to be hard for them to want to leave. I know the culture there. It's fantastic and the people all enjoy being around each other. But yeah, I think thinking about the fact that eventually not everyone will still be at sweetfish as a smart move and that you're investing positively toward that future is a real benefit to the team. That's awesome. Now, how do you think about like getting employees invested in the program? was there something that got fourteen of them on board? Did you pitch it?...

...was there a big meeting where you shared like a slide deck? Did you, I don't know, put a video together? Like, what was it? The got people to say, yeah, I'm willing to spend time on this because I have a full time job and it is not posting on Linkedin, but I'm willing to do something extra here. How do you get them in that? I think we were talking about it a lot already and people are naturally seeing what's going on on linked and they saw kind of like I think what happened with me is I started posting a lot to Linkedin, so I had some initial interest from people. is we would just kind of like so seeds and of course, I think I did in February a big presentation in front of the team of all this is what it's done. Yeah, for everybody involved, you know, and I tagged Emily debrito and Emily Wellman and a lot of people behind the scenes that don't get enough recognition for it and kind of like gave them a huge praise report and then started just putting out feelings to see who else would be interested in one on one conversations. And then eventually I announced it as a quold program and just took open invitations and I tried to pitch it like this is going to be great for you, it's going to be great for sweetish. Come like join us, it's going to be awesome trying to make clear what the program look like. Of course, some people I don't know. We still had one on one conversations with a lot of them to make sure like it was going to work for them, and I understand if it did because something else going on the season to like you don't want to put the extra effort in. But we even set us, I work time to work on this. So it's not like all personal time, all on your lunch break. I do expect some of it will come on your personal time, but I don't know. They could spend thirty minutes, probably thirty to sixty minutes a day working on their post, working on comments, engaging with people on Linkedin, as long as it doesn't get in the way of their other responsibilities. Sure so you thinking of as additive within the day to day? That's great. I'm like, what's been your biggest learning from this process so far? Would you say, what do you observed or, you know, didn't expect out of it? Yeah, I wasn't really active on Linkedin a time before this, so it's amazing to see this community. I kind of, you know, just had an archaic view, a bit of like this is just where you have your resume and go look for robs. But I think it's amazing that it's a platform that you can have real conversations with people and learn so much from them. And something that I've been learning as I've been working with our team and like writing content for fourteen different evangelist has just kind of what you were talking about, like what does motivate people to be a part of this? And I think for those who don't enjoy writing, a huge incentive is that they're building their personal brands, and so I think obviously like a win for the companies, that win for everybody as well. But I think that's a really cool part of it, like Dan was talking about, like if you can build this brand and take it with you anywhere, like that's a really amazing thing. That's really unique, because I think a personal brand is becoming like the new resume almost right like a good portfolio, and so it's been cool to learn about that and see that play out. I think there's gonna be a lot of listeners on this who are going to be in the same place who thought of Linkedin. Maybe they heard the James Episode, maybe they didn't, but are thinking about linkedin. Is just this place where we put our resume or maybe we're, you know, marketers, go and talk, but it's a place where a lot of people are talking, a lot of people are sharing their making connections and I think, you know, ideally, things like covid only accelerated the rate of which we want to connect with people digitally, because that's the audience we have. That's the place where we can go to find other people like us and meet them that when we don't have trade shows or maybe we don't like to travel. You know, maybe I've got three little kids, I don't travel very much. I meet a lot of folks be a linkedin. It's been incredible boosts. So love that you've been learning that and, like Dan, you want to add something. I was just going to say it's way easier to do it as a group than individually. Yes, it's the vidually you're all by yourself, it takes a lot longer to get the engagement. But if you're doing it as a team and you're all engaging with the each other's post we have a whole slack channel just for the evangelist where they post their continent. It's kind of like an internal engagement group. It's just us, so we can keep track of each other's post incase the algorithm skips us, you know, but it gets initial let means, like even from day one, if you have no following, like we even had one team member. He started with zero, he had no linked in profile. Got Him going. But of course, like, we're all showing up. So there's, you know, on fourteen and fifteen of US showing up to comment on his stuff. It's going to get seen by...

...people. So it gives you a lot more initial traction when you can attack it as a group and therefore you're not just like seeing crickets every single post for months before you start to get a little bit of traction and starts to snowball. You snowball much more quickly just because there's a whole group behind you. Yeah, I can tell you as someone who was posting a long time ago and Linkedin, it's brutal to hear crickets it. You've got to be consistently committed to just saying your piece and hopefully connecting with people who are like minded or learning something from someone else, and it takes a long time. So it's wonderful that you've got the team support behind that. The thing that I think I'll add from my own experience working with Linkedin and what most brands do is typically they're just resharing stuff from their corporate posts or they're just resharing like hey, we want to get attendance to this Webinar and that's what all the employers are doing. And if you go and engage with each other's post there it's kind of weak because there's really nothing personal, there's nothing interesting, there's nothing driving and it just feels like, okay, well, we're kind of like falsely popping up this thing that's really clearly just a corporate post. What's really unique about the sweetish post of all that I've seen? I've seen quite a few lately. It very much feels like that individual person and so when you comment as another individual person, yeah, sure, you're at their company, but like your commenting is a human talking to another human. That's truly unique. I don't think a lot of people have that in their programs, even if they have that kind of advocacy around promoting internal things. I know a lot of companies do that, but I have not seen many to the degree or any to the degree that sweetish is doing that on that human to human level, and that's applause worthy. So congratulations to both you on building such an exciting program I'm sure will have another revisit to this and when you all are you know, fifty percent of your revenues being contributed strictly from Linkedin, because this is incredible. I have two questions for each of you and I'll ask you separately. So Emily. First, if you had twice the staff, so if you can hire a bunch of people with you, twice the budget or twice the time, what would you choose? I would choose twice the staff, I think. Okay, yeah, I would hire more people. Yeah, well, like people to work with me. Yeah, yeah, for sure. I would love some more people to help pump out some content with me. That's awesome. Dan, what would you do? Oh, twice the staff, for sure. Yeah, marketing, like ad budgets, becoming less and less effective. But I'm you probably know this if you see me post anything. I'm on the quantity game, like versus quality. I'm like, the more content we can make, the better. I would just figure out more ways to shove content at a different places, like and make a good content. That's actually helpful and out there and more consistent. But I can make more content, like if I could write like ten posts for every evangelist instead of three a week, I would. That's awesome, great. And then, Dan, we'll start with you and we'll go to emily. What other marketers are out there who you look up to maybe doing something interesting? I know you mentioned Chris Walker, for example, but who else out there are you listening to or watching that we should be paying attention to? I mean, there's always Gary Vander Chuck Right. I'm a huge Super Fan. So James Another Super Fan of Gary Ny. She's right now. You know, it's like I I love his stuff. I didn't buy his NFT, but I'm I'm really paying attention to what he's doing there because I think he's actually like even for bea to see. I think he's still a few years ahead on the NFT thing and that and creating Ip specifically. I think that's even the bigger play than the NFTS, though the NFT is how you monetize Ip, but bringing Ip out into the marketing world, I think, is going to be a thing. So I'm really paying attention to that. But that's going to play out later on. Something that affects now more is Noah higin. He's really killing it. If you have a paying attention to like what he's doing, he's going to matter more to Gen z than any other marker, except for maybe Gary Vander Chuck, as he's playing there too. But what he's doing is he's interviewing not marketers, but he's interviewing content creators, youtubers, people upandcoming email newsletters, podcasters getting he's trying to figure out how to produce the best content because he already knows the marketing and he's just being super on vulnerable and his journey in his podcast about like even his personal stuff, about his failures and defeats and different things...

...like that what he's trying to aim for. So that's been an interesting journey to watch him go through. Fantastic, Garry v no, Okaygan, those are great. Those are great. Yeah, Noah in particular, I he's caught my attention recently. So it's wonderful that you shared that. Emily. Maybe you're newer to this because you haven't been spending so much time in the linkedin sphere, but has there been anyone that's caught your attention or anybody that you're paying attention to or maybe from past experience that you just feel like hey, this is a great writer or somebody I've listened to. Yeah, so I really like the page marketing millennials on Linkedin and I don't know who's in charge of that, but I think they do a great job. And I know that's not an individual that's a company page. But as far no great example, though. Yeah, yeah, as far as company pages go, like that's a great one and they actually get a lot of engagement with there. So the only company page it's getting engagement. I always learn a lot from it, though, and I love to see their stuff. But I think so. I spend a lot of time on twitter as well. I know that a lot of times that, like you know, bleeds into linkedin and vice versa. And so someone I love on twitter is Blake Amal. I'm not sure if it's a something, but he is like amazing, amazing copywriting tips and he just has some really good insight there, and so I'm sure he's on Linkedin. I don't know, like around then. But yeah, there's a cool kids are that's what I'm hearing. So that's right. That's right. So those are the two that I usually learn from. Will content from so awesome. We'll try and link to his twitter Byo then, because that sounds great. Well, thank you both for joining us. It's been a pleasure to learn so much more about your program I'm excited to take some of the learnings and at our own team at open sense, and I know a lot of the folks that listen to the show who are in our sphere of influence we're going to be sharing this with them for a very long time to come, because this is not flash in the PAN. Haylingkedin's going to be gone tomorrow. You know, I've been producing content on Linkedin for like five years and have only seen more and more returns from investing there, and it's exciting that you've put something programmatic around it, because it's very daunting, you know, for a new person, this is a huge risk to make a business decision to go hire full time or to figure out how we're going to put a program around this. But you shared enough details here I think people really have a good hope and a good chance to really start something exciting if it makes sense for their brand. So thank you both. So much for joining and for sharing this with us. Thank you, rex yeah, thanks rots. Thanks for listening to growth marketing camp. If you enjoyed this episode, we'd love it if you would give it a quick five star rating or share it with a friend or colleague looking to get a little more inspiration for their next campaign. If you want to learn more about the company behind the show, had to open sensecom. That's open, ske skecom. Will catch you on the next episode.

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