Growth Marketing Camp
Growth Marketing Camp

Episode 24 · 1 year ago

How Postal.io Trojan Horsed Their Own Product and Launched Postal Events

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Early stage marketers are constantly being asked to do more in less time, and Lauren Alt Kishpaugh is no exception. She found herself with just 30 days to launch Postal Events, during a global pandemic no less. So she used her own product to launch an exclusive, exciting remote event for marketers to get the word out. In that short window, they were able to generate a thousand registrations with half attending live! Plus, they generated 3x ROI within 3 months! Check out the full episode to learn how she pulled it off.

... marketers to de mystify growth and give you the insights to help turn your next campaign into a major success. Let's get into it. What's up everybody? This is bobby nurrage. I'm one of the cohost here with growth marketing camp. I am so excited to be joined today by an old buddy of mine, Lauren, with postal dot io. Laurens, you want to take a quick second and introduce yourself to our audience today? Sure, it's nice to see you, bobby. I work at postal. I am the director of demand generation currently. We're a small team and I was brought on in January to help build the foundation of our growth efforts and, you know, our marketing team in general. My background is in tech and mostly demand generation marketing operations. I've worked at other tech companies like outreach, which is where I met Bobby, solve health and a couple others. So I'm demand Jean through and through. Absolutely. Yeah, I have had the distinct pleasure of working in the had a couple of your previous stops. I think one of the things that's really exciting for me about this conversation today is the fact that postal basically was started within the last couple of years. We spoke about this little bit earlier, but I had a chance to meet Eric at an outreach event and it was right before he had started the business and to see going from basically idea and concept to business with and how. I'm not exactly sure how many employees there are, but I'd love to kind of just get your perspective on that. I mean to tell me a bit about the postal story, because it isn't new company relatively speaking. It's operating in a space that maybe isn't necessarily new, so I imagine that there's opportunities there and also challenges. We love to kind of just get your broad perspective on the business to this point. Yeah, yeah, you. So you met Eric probably around the same time that I met Eric. Actually, Erica is their CEO. I guess we didn't mention that. The CEO Postal, and he was doing market research on something like a postal and was looking into building an after his last venture and he saw an opportunity and started, you know, doing some investigative research on whether or not it would be lucrative for him to build something. So two years ago we hadn't even built postal. It was more of the research phase and we actually didn't launch postal like as a platform until two thousand and twenty. So Mare to two thousand and twenty, just at the beginning of the pandemic and that's when we had technology, to be honest. So it's only been a year, not even two years, since we had postal in the flesh, and then it wasn't really until the summer of two thousand and twenty that we started bringing on paying customers. So it really has been less than a years since we've brought our first customer on. People are surprised to hear that because I feel like, you know, postals a name that comes up a lot and we do get you know that we have gotten that brand traction. And so this last year has been a journey of figuring out, you know, what our nit shes and where we can scale the business. And so now, you know, we just sign up our two hundred...

...customer yesterday and we've grown immensely. You know, we've far exceeded the targets that we had for ourselves and you know, we weren't the first to market right, like we have headers that are legacy in the space. Part of the reason why I came to postal and really believed in it when I first heard about it years ago was because I have used competitors in the space as a marketer and I felt like there was definitely an opportunity to you know, they all do good parts. They're good at small parts of, you know, the experience marketing as a channel. And what Eric's philosophy is is that we're a tech company. A lot of other companies that are trying to do this right now are trying to straddle a line between logistics, ware housing, product management and then the actual tech technology, and we have focused our efforts on a hundred percent, on making great technology and leveraging partners to do the other part that we don't do well cool or that we don't do we choose not to do, and that's what makes us I think has gotten us all this. You know, great and amazing feedback from customers is that we made sure the tech was their first, so it's easy to use, it's easy to scale and it's easy to track, and that is kind of our core competency here. Absolutely, that's pretty incredible. I have a couple of followup questions. It's based on what you shared. Number One, and I don't know if you'd have the answer to this, but you know, when you talk about some of the background research that perhaps Eric was doing as a part of investigation, and I'm curious if there were any sort of pillars that were identified that perhaps that the business has sort of been built upon from that point. And then I'd also be really curious to know, you know, you mentioned yourself the first customer came on about a year ago, but the brand has presence in the market place. I mean, we obviously are aware where. I think we're customers as well, if I'm not mistaken. How do you do that? You are a customer. Okay, thanks for confirming that. How do you do that? I mean, like how do you go from your brand awareness? And is that potentially, you know, is that possible because of some of the ideas that perhaps ericn covered as a part of his research? I mean, maybe there was just distinct opportunity there. I mean, I'm not sure, but what is your yeah, definitely so. So what's cool about postal is that we have a virality opportunity okay for a three side of market place. So we have the vendors, so we have small local businesses that actually pipe in through our API and connect their you know, they get instant connections to our market place from their small business. So, for example, we have a local flower shop in San Luis Obispo, where we're headquarters. They sell to a consumer audience because people walk into slow they sell, they buy the flowers with postal. They can now access the BB audience by plugging in their system into ours. They can receive orders from B Tob then ship those orders direct to the recipients. So we have that vendor market place. So we have hundreds of vendors, most of them small business and local business, because that's kind of our business philosophy. And then we have the recipient side of the market place. So when I send you a gift, you receive, you know, a postal from whether it's me or, so you know, somebody else. And then there's the customer, so the person that's love working the software to send it. So the fact...

...that we have that multiplier effect was really great for us because, for one, we built a great platform with great technology that, you know, made it really easy to send gifts. So when you've got it, you were super happy. You're like, what is this thing? Somebody sending this thing via this APP called postal, and vendors love it because they've now been able to scale their small business and reach an untap revenue channel. So that's you know, they love talking about it, and then there's the customers that enjoy using the technology, hopefully, you know, and that has helped us get that virality word of mouth happening without US having to spend a ton of money and marketing, because we still are, you know, for my perspective, we're still really small budgets, but we're seeing an amazing results from paid programs and organic programs and I think that part of the word of mouth, of the virality experience is what's happening here. So this is really interesting to me. So you're talking about a three sided market place and I imagined the innovation there then is that perhaps some of the legacy players are more call it, to side it. Maybe they're the ones who are sort of buying product and storing and then you're interacting with them as a be to be vendor and potentially have the recipient, but you're now bringing a whole new swath of individuals and stakeholders in the businesses who are now incentivized to interact with the brand, promote the brand, and so you're kind of getting that addition, don't you called it a reality multiplier. I think earlier have been a made up name, but there's definitely I like it. Let's use I mean it makes sense, right. I mean there's literally a whole another set of stakeholders involved in your business and it makes sense that that would sort of generate additional traction. I mean it's just more people talking about the product. Yeah, competitors in our space generally either work directly with the people who are making the product and and you know, handle facilitate that. We're connecting them directly. So really just through our platform we're connecting and we believe that. You know, directmails been around forever. It's just the facilitating, the sending and the scaling of it which is been the hard part. And that's what we do, is we focus on the technology to help the people who already do it. Well, there's people out there who have been around for decades and decades. Ye will make amazing direct mail and we just work with them as partners and have our technology connector, because they're not going to technology. They're great at making great products cool. So then, as a part of your marketing strategy, I mean like it would make sense that you would market to a prospect or customer, like like open sense, but are you also marketing to vendors as well? I mean, is that a part of marketing at postal? Very smart. We definitely have things in the works that aren't public, but we do see akin of traction from vendors that want to use postal to help other parts of their business right, and so that's an opportunity because they see how easy it is to use. That was the main thing, as we need to be simple for people like you who purchase it, but you're also to tech savvy type of person, but also on the vendor side of the APP, because they're typically not they're typically modern pop shops, Yep, who need really...

...easy acts, like easy way to manage orders, and so they're only managing orders be the postal, but what if they could manage more orders the postal? So you know, we're in the works of thinking about the vendor experience, but that's definitely absolutely something that we get a lot. Yeah, make sense and again, I'm just having had this conversation with you. Just this whole idea of at three side of market place and just again opening up to whole another set of people is just so brilliant to me. So yeah, so you're approaching kind of a green field opportunity. I mean, I guess it's green field to your business because as of last year you had no customers and you need to find them. Where did you find your initial customers? Where you finding them now? I mean, like, I know the concept. Meet your market, meet your customer where they're at? Where are your customers today? It's so interesting because we launched in a pandemic, as a lot of start ups, but we launched March two thousand and twenty. So things changed very abruptly for us and we realize that we really do a few things that were very specific to the pandemic. We realize that people needed a way to ship things that weren't from their warehouse, that were in their office. They were in their office, they would manage a swag closet or they would they have people in office where they could pack boxes and Seth so there was an opportunity for marketers, for hr for everyone to figure out how to send things in the cloud. Really, you're not doing things about that. They have to be hoped some more else and someone else has to do that logistics and handling for them. With that. People also move locations. Everyone's breaking from home and everybody has the wrong address for their yeah, so not only are all your employees now at their homes, which I guess you typically would have on hand, but now all your prospects are at home and all the addresses you have in your sales force are incorrect for shipping them good. Yeah, that became a huge problem. And so what you would have to do with other technology in the spaces, like ask somebody, Hey, bobby, I want to send you something. Do you mind emailing me your address? People are uncomfortable with that because they don't want to give out their home address to a someone that's selling them something, even like an account manager. It's just like a slightly strange to a lot of people. And so there was that weird thing we had to do. We had a dance around the fact that we were all at home and we build this thing called magic link, which is a way to capture some of the dress about asking them for their address. It's just a unique url you can send out and you can say Lauren is sending bobby something. Accept it by putting your address. It also does that like the psychology of you accepting a gift for me and yeah, giving it to you, versus somebody sending you something against your will. Yeah, so that's kind of what helped our product development evolve in the pandemic. And then the other thing is that we were seeing a lot of people shipping alcohol from our market place like that was and we were like, well, we know everyone's drinking. That's weird because the pandemic, because we are. But we what we realized was that people are actually sending things to a company virtual events they were having. So they were sending wine from our market days or whiskey from our market place to then they were facilitating like some kind of offline virtual event, ABM field event, and we, you know,...

...talk to a couple customers about it and we were like, what if your talent, the registration capture and the event event kits, so whatever belongs with that experience can be managed in postal so you can find the wine maker, the local winemaker. We know we have Napa Valley winemakers that are in there as well. They have an out of the box wine experience for taste, you know, for wines on the tasting men. I think we did one together. Absolutely, yeah, you were at one of our wine tasting events. But so magical, I think, was the wine we used a NAPA. What if we could connect that whole experience to the event kit and, like postal, would automatically ship out the wine seven days before the event and make sure that it got there in time. So that's where postal events came to be. Was Wow, basically because of the pandemic. So then we now have as part of our market place. We don't just have goods, we have experiences. So you can book I mean everything from the latest one is hilarious to me. It's foam and Fizz, it's called, and it's foam rolling and then Champagne and networking and it's just we have. I mean we have so many obscure amazing events. So we have hundreds of those experiences and it's really just an aggregation of our gifting market place with connecting them with the talent or the vendors. I had no idea that pandemic inspired the postal events branch of the business, and it makes sense. I had a small pivot or we more just like bit off more, yeah, product development perspective than we initially thought we would, and we launched that in February of this year. So we kind of made that decision in summer of two twenty to build it and then two thousand and twenty one, in February we launched over a hundred experiences and wow, it's been good because people are still doing virtual and then they're also figuring out how to make hybrid events in the future. I'm curious, does marketing and growth work hand in hand with product to some extent, because it's one thing for product to determine, Hey, we should probably launch experiences, but then it's another thing to actually go and do it and bring into the market place and to do it quickly. I think speaks to probably a some element of collaboration. Is that correct? Yes, definitely. So this precedes my time at postal, but definitely eric is a great leader and he has a really strong understanding of all, you know, core functions of the business. You don't he the sales guy through and through, but he understands marketing really well. And you know our CO founder, Jed, who you know. People don't always mention Jed because he's like our fearless technical founder in the background, but he's super sharps that. They're a really good team because they bounced each other out there and for a marking perspective, they knew that they wanted to do this. Once they decide, they knew they wanted to do it, they wanted someone to lead the product development that actually was a market. So they hired I don't know if you ever met Keana. You Know Keana? Yeah, Yana, a semi who used to run events of outreach. They've hired her to manage the product development because they they didn't want a product manager or like a engineeer to manage what this should...

...be. They wanted a real marketer or a field marketer to come in and build what they like their dream product would be. So she's now functioning as the management of that product development. So it's really like it was built by a marketer. That is so cool. That is so cool. That's why we get cool creative things like foam and fizz. Yeah, she's you know this reminds me of a conversation I had with a marketer at help spot, and his idea was that marketers should spend time with customer success, to talk to customers and understand what their pain points are and how they're interacting with the product. Now you're telling me about a marketer who is basically working with product and who brings a level of understanding expertise into how to execute and deliver a product that speak specifically to a marketing need or a marketing function. I think that's totally fascinating. Like to just sort of wrap your head around the fact that, like marketers, it's almost a context is so important. You know whether it's context of what the customers pain points are or context of how to create value for the customer. Based on your own experience, it seems like that's sort of like an important ingredient to creating successful marketing. Yeah, I mean from the start of postal, Eric really like wanted to use inputs to build his product. He didn't want to make it what he wanted to make. He asked people like me, yeah, you could have whatever you wanted. What would it look like? And that's what he built and that's what he continues to build and so it it's the first time I've seen someone do this and it's really interesting because, you know, we have the product expert, he's already we have good, you know, product management leadership, but what they don't have on the product and engineering teams typically is the ICP sitting there and managing it. So Keana those things like customers are going to want this and engineers don't always or you know, don't always think of yes, you don't think in the same way that we do. So it's been really cool to see. Yeah, yeah, because the alternative is talked to ton of customers and that takes time and sometimes you'll get it right, sometimes you won't. But when you do, someone like that directly into the mix a sort of probably shortened some of the development cycles a little bit in terms totally. Yeah, and we love talking to customers. We're still so small and we can like pivots, so pivot and iterate really quickly. For example, are like sales force integration that we just launched. We had a manage package and we use inputs from myself, from internal ICPS, from our revops and then from customers who are big sales force users and figured out how to make the sales force campaign integration actually useful for them. Yeah, yeah, this is reminding me. It speaks to sort of the talent that postal has been able to attract and and it reminds me of a question I wanted to make sure I asked you about, which is, you know, one of the things I remember in my conversation with Eric is is she's, believe, believe, based in San Luis Obispo, and I believe the companies headquartered out of there. I think you'd mentioned to me in a prior conversation that there's a little bit of a split, but maybe you can just tell me a little bit about sort of you know what that means. I mean it's a California...

...based startup, not necessarily Silicon Valley based start up, but I'm just wondering if there's elements of that that have contributed to your ability to be nimbles, successful, creative, whatever the qualities are that have gotten you to your two hundred customer here almost a year after launching. Yeah, yeah, Eric speaks a little better to it than I do, but you know, at his core, when he founded the company, he didn't want to instill the high pressure, intense nature that comes in the Silicon Valley. And he also wanted to build a diverse workforce with people with different backgrounds, not, you know, tech on tech, which is me. So it needs he hired me. He you know, he hired what he needs. But we are also you know, with diversity comes stronger product, stronger team, stronger leadership, and we've been able to build a really diverse background of experiences with the people that work a postal and we've developed a really strong culture around balance. So we work hard, but you know, there's also we have go fishing or go surfing. None of those things I obviously do can do, but you know I have people in my team that go fishing or, you know, go surfing, you know when the surf's good, and it helps people understand the balance of working hard and play hard. Yeah, so we have a really nice mentality at the office in HQ that people are attracted to and a lot of people have been open to leaving the bay area, especially in the pandemic, and we've been able to, you know, get some good talent there. However, not everyone can move to slow I have a mortgage up in the bay area. So we have about fifty percent of our workforce remote. So we have, you know, a little hub in Chicago, we have a little hub in the bay area, we have a little hub in Denver and, you know, airic really believes in just hiring the best talent and that means finding them where they are. So we've built a really good I think the future of postal would be having actual office, satellite offices and all of these hubs and then keeping HQ in this Nice Beach Down and I have gone to headquarters once since that, since the pandemic, and I will say it's nice to go to Pismo beach for work. My only experience with Pismo beach is from looney tunes. That's like a thirty five now, so that's a really old reference. I've never been there, but my kindness it sounds really beautiful. YEA, from what I've heard coming out of pandemic here, what challenges and or opportunities do you foresee, because it seems like there's certainly a spring boarding of just people were dispersed and not in central locations. I don't know that office life is going to come back to what it was before. I imagine at some point it will. But I guess what do you all think about or talk about as it pertains to coming out of Penn stomach? And what again, either challenges are opportunities that presents for the company. Yeah, there's both. Right, there's challenges and there's opportunities for us and for the industry, I think, for everyone in tech. When we talk to customers, it sounds like there's going to be an element of remote and in person for any foreseeable future. So the beauty of what we do...

...is we make it easy to facilitate that offline engagement, whether you're in person, remote, half and half whatever, and so that's opportunity for us to make sure that what we remain top of minds when people go back to the office or they go back to office part time or they have, you know, on hand one satellite office and figuring out how to keep the conversation going about you're not always going to have a physical one to one interaction with somebody and it being openminded to, you know, having an opportunity outside of your own geographic region. I mean, was so cool about the pandemic was, despite not being able to see people in person, the amount of people that we saw and brought together for events that were in different countries or different time zones. Never happened before. It's pretty cool. So being able to have a wine tasing event where we had people from New York, London and California on at the same time never happened. Sure, we've tried and you know, we with the dream force and we try, you know, we try to see each other, but the ability to have those connections with people outside of the geographic region was really cool and I hope that, you know, we're able to help facilitate and keep that storyline going, because I thought it was one of the best parts of us being virtual. Yeah, and it makes sense because I think one way or another, I think distributed teams are going to become more normal, and so that makes a ton of sense that that would be a continued opportunity. Let's actually switch gears here a little bit. You obviously you oversee growth into mandjen and so I'd love to kind of just have some behind the scenes insight, Lauren, into a particular campaign that perhaps move the needle or one that you're really proud of and it maybe you can just sort of set the stage for you know what the opportunity was and how you perhaps sort of presented an idea and we can dig into some of the ways that manifested. But could you maybe just dig into that a little bit with me? So I've been here six months. I started January fifteen, I think, and we launched postal events on February fifteen. I think. It's postal events launch was more of a go to market launch. It was also, you know, a huge campaign for us and I had thirty days to turn that around, myself and the entire team, and I think that was a really interesting campaign because I came in with okay, what do we have? We have limited time. We have limited resources because we're still super small and strappy and I don't have millions of dollars like I did at previous companies. Yeah, so what can we do with limited time, with thirty days? We have limited resources. We have x amount of dollars to make a huge splash with this part that we think is really incredible and we did like we you know, took a lot of time and power and thought and creativity. H But what we did for the launch was we use our own product to announce the product. Okay, so leading up to the event, we use postal events to actually capture the registration for a big comedy show that we were going to do, and we didn't tell anyone that they were using postal events to actually register for the show. But we just promoted this...

...show. So we're really we're getting second city comedy is a famous Improv Group based out of Chicago, Yep. So we brought them on to do this virtual comedy show for US Improv and we promoted it for, you know, as I think, four weeks, four weeks learning up to our product launch and without, you know, a lot of paid media investment or, you know, any budget all for promotion, we were able to get to a thousand registrations and that's from US leveraging, leveraging. Sorry, didn't mean to cut you off. That's a jaw dropping statement you just made. I mean, we never done a marketing program at all. So I had, I told I, you know, set pretty well expectations for Eric because I didn't want to lose my job. The first is there, and also I like to exceed expectations in set the barlow. Okay, cool, good stuy. Let's make a note of that one. But what what do you mean by that, though? So no paid media, no budget, but thousand re registrations. How the heck? Yea Work. Yes, that's a good question. So, yeah, so we had to have something interesting and fun, right. So we were relays end of the day, and what postal events is about is like people don't want to sit on webinars anymore. Yeah, they don't want to sit on sixty minutes slide presentations. They need something more engaging, conversational like we're doing right now, and then something else, an x factor that I'll draw them in, because we didn't know how much people knew about postal. They don't know our brand name, they don't know that we've done cool events. It's like every tech company ever wants to do an amazing conference, but until you do your first one successfully, it's near possible to get people to come. You have no credibility in your conference being cool. Unleash for that outreach was that it was very difficult to get the first cohort of people to come to unleash. So that's what I was worried about. was like, okay, we're doing this virtual event. Nobody knows about us. Potentially, no one knows a postal events has. How are we going to how are we going to make a splash? And that was second city is a good name. It was fun. It was not educational. It was just like come, have fun, have some laughs, and then we leverage our influence, our network. So like we have, you know, we're connected with a couple advisors that are bigger influencers, like Scott Parker and Kyle Lacy, are both official advisors of postal, and we knew that we'd have to use them and their networks to be able to get in front of the audience without in lieu of like paid programs, because we had, you know, I think we had a couple hundred followers on linkedin. We didn't have a lot. Yeah, and so our linkedin posts were not going to get us to a thousand, and yet neither was our database. Or database wasn't of optins. Weren't huge. Got It. So we started a series of like sales versus marketing roast videos between Kyle and Scott on linkedin about once a week, and they're great because they're good on camera and we just kind of let them loose and they like maybe they riffed on each other on zoom for like an hour and then we took it and cut it and edit it and we like send it back to them and they posted the snippets of the video throughout the next four weeks and those videos got tons of traction because...

...they're funny and silly and sales and marketing love to battle. So that was kind of the bit that we had going to get the promotion behind it and the numbers behind it. So that was one of the things that we did that I felt like was really interesting and kind of grill a marketing e to yeah, the numbers and the reach of the networks that we didn't have. Yeah, you know, it's so fascinating when you think about Linkedin as a social media network because you know, obviously instagram, you got the Kim Kardashians of the world to are, you know, the world class influencers, but the fact is that sales and marketing have influencers to and it's just kind of neat to hear about how that's successfully leveraged to create the buzz and doing so. I mean that's actually the key there is that like you're not I mean their advisors, but you're not paying them. I mean it's not like it's not like paid media. It's just leveraging the networks that they've built in the relationships that you have to kind of drive that brand influence and and to know that it was done successfully. I think is because, I don't know, I mean you with them, was that they wanted to do it. They want looks fun. Yeah, it was actually something that seemed interesting and unique. was that we're doing a comedy show. It was another Webinar. It wasn't another like he can you like our post on social media. It was something that got them like some views and some excitement and they had fun doing it, and so that was part of it. was like they actually felt like it was interesting to them as well. Yeah, I was going to ask like if they were advising some other company, like would it have been successful or was it really about the offer at the end of the day? Like the awesome and hilarious show? I've seen them live. I mean it's it's a really cool show that's pretty neat. So influencer marketing was a really valuable, call it channel for this particular launch. Where there any other sort of places that that postal found some opportunities? Arbitrage opportunities, perhaps underserved places where marketers were consuming or engaging. Yeah, I mean these slack communities were good for us as well. I'm part of a lot of the marketing slack communities kind and just trying to stay oupentic and not trying to be bimy and just, yeah, say hey, we're doing this thing and might be interesting to field marketers who are trying to do virtual events. Otherwise we got a ton attraction from those communities of people who are Super Niche thinking about abm and thinking about virtual field events or demandsion. Those were big for us. But the other thing is you can't just get registrations. You also got to get people to come. Absolutely, in the pandemic a tenant rate on virtual events just like bombed. Yep, I think pre pandemic it was thirty three percent, was industry standard, and then of registration to attendance and during pandemic it was subtwenty with industry standards. So our hunch, our hypothesis, especially with our own product, was that if you send something physical with the event registration, people are more likely to attend because they'll be reminded of it and they'll feel like it's interesting, special and unique, and so we get had a...

...limited number of event kids. So we made these really that's a cute boxes that are branded with our event copy and our event kind of messaging around the comedy show. We said things registering and inside was just a box of tea and a box of coffee and said coffees for closers to use, for targeters, and it was like the marketing versus Sales Ah, nice, okay, cool thing. Yeah, cost us a ton. I mean for me and my small budgets, like it felt like a very big investment because you know, when you do things that are branded, everything was branded with postal on it. Yeah, can get price, but we gave away three hundred kits. So we made three hundred kids. That's all I had money for, and we said first three hundred people get the kids. We got thousand registrations, so about seven hundred people didn't get the Kit and we got a fifty percent attendance rate. Amazing. Okay, so our hypothesis was proven true with the boxes. Yeah, yeah, that's really fascinating, because you said it was closer to twenty percent. So you're getting about a thirty percent pre meum, are boost because, and arguably so, there's two things that play here. At number one, the offer itself is incredibly unique, with second city versus ten things to definitely not do in your ABM campaigns, Webinar. Right. So, so you got like really awesome of the four. I'm sure. I'm sure like ten companies haven't done that before. But then also reinforcing it with sort of that physical reminder and honestly, you know, I should have known. I mentioned earli. I was wondering if open sense with the customer. Well, here's my physical reminder that we are this is a succulent garden, which I think was a postal experience that we did as a company just about two weeks ago, and I think this whole idea of sort of supplementing your digital event was sort of a physical kind of Trinket, or whatever you'd want to call it. Physical. It's almost like a reminder. Is a really interesting way to get that that boost relative to, you know, what we've all gone through in the last year. That's resulted in attendance rates dropping. So that's actually really for to it as an interesting that your business kind of is right on the forefront of that. Yeah, what I've learned and doing in ourselves is like it doesn't have to be to a hundred percent of attendees. Like I didn't have thousand box I didn't have my effort thousand, but three hundred got us the promotional juice to get us to our numbers and people actually showed up. In addition, it doesn't always have to be a experience. It doesn't always have to building or cocktail making or like, doing something of your hands are good. I will say our philosophy is like, if you can keep people's hands busy, they will pay attention to your virtual event. So the wine tasting, the cocktail making, the cooking, it's all good because it's not them clicking onto their slack. So that's kind of like our main philosophy. But like, for example, we're doing this again, was second city, actually in July, because we just had such great traction from it. We're doing that block party with them, Summer Block party, and we're making these really cool boxes. So it's not like it's not interactive. They don't make anything during the show, but it's like a Red Celo Cup, you know. It's like, you know, I won't give away all the surprises but it's just some summer classic stuff that I'll make them feel excited to come to our virtual block party. Amazing and I imagine...

...the launch was successful. I mean you mentioned the attendance rate. Where there any other sort of metrics that used to kind of gage the success that you'd be willing to share? We got to show up and Trojan horse our product and tell aground on the line like we're going to do a comedy show, but we had to tell you like this is you're using right now. You're on postal events. So we're lost today. So it's really fun. Eric loved it. It got some good buzz and we proved three xroy on the investment from within three months. So that was the and the cost of the event really was just the cost to hire second city and the cost of the kits and we proved oury within three months of launching. So I would say it was a successful campaign because we're able to drive new business in from it. Amazing. So like you hired in January event in February, within three months you've done three x Roy. So not a bad sort of way to start your career at that postal no, not a bad way to kick. It was a little bit stressful those first thirty days, but we did it and it was a really fun right and we're all kind of bonded because of it. All of us had to. I think there's three of us that started on January fifteen that were part of this launch crew. We had a woman in Corey who is our INNERN VPM who helped out with the launch, who's an incredible so it's like her, myself and he on. All started on January fifteen and we had thirty days. So it was fun. It was like a think tank environment. Yeah, super cool. Love that. Part of working at startups is just that grind it out, figure it out and do it and then when you're successful, like they're high fives in order, for sure. I know we're coming up on time here. I do want to ask for other marketers who are listening. Who Do you read or who do you listen to? Like, who should we be potentially even asking to join the show, like just across the industry, are there any folks that you think are just extraordinary in terms of the insight or advice that they're able to provide? There's a ton. The ones you don't know. I mean, you got to have been from postal Keyana's amazing. If you want to talk about product or marketing or field marketing all that jazz. You know, Joe Turnog, who works a pendosml Yep, is incredible. You know, he's very down to Earth, he's very smart, he's very sharp. He's not trying to prove anything, he's just doing really good work and he building good teams and I really love, you know, his mentorship and you know kind of relationship we have there. So he's always someone that I go to and he always has. He always also has snarky things to say on Linkedin, which I love. Yeah, he's not, you know, trying to prove something bynd blowing on Linkedin. He's just like spitting one liners and I really respect the casual nature of his strategy because I kind of live that as well. I'm not the most you know, refined your professional director. I just and who I am and I love what I do and I try and just beat myself. It's one of the things I appreciate about speaking with you and one of the reasons we're doing the show. Barn is like, you know, when you hear the word growth, I don't know why it implies anything super magical or special. Every business needs to grow, right, and so a lot of times, just like instinct, logic, just understanding your business, your customer in the market, is what's needed, right.

There's no special degree that you can get and growth. Right, it's just understanding, like how you are going to grow your business, just given those three sort of variables there. And our goal is kind of demistify, and I think what you've described today is a perfect example of we are launching the product using our product, like Duh, kind of you know, like like like not to take any way, like it's incredible you did, but like this is strategy that if you have an understanding of your customer, your product in the market, like why wouldn't you come up with that? Right? So it's like it's amazing to see that be sort of the strategy and then to see execute and then obviously the payoff, you know, the Roy on it. So I think the kind of reinforces, I think, your demeanor and perhaps that you're describing with Joe and ultimately like what we're trying to convey in this podcast, which is you have your ideas, you just gotta if you have an understanding, you have good ideas, like execute them and good things will happen. Yeah, I think marketer are looking for like a playbook or a full bird. But you know, you don't always have millions of dollars and you don't always have millions of days to do things, and so using common sense, using data but also using common sense, is the key to growth in my opinion. Let's just put that on the tagline for this podcast. Using common sense is the getting there's my light bulb moment. This is great. I always enjoy chatting with you and it was fun to do it today in this context. I really appreciate your taking the time out of your data to speak with us and, like, honestly, it's really incredible to you know, we see it, we sense it, the growth that postal is achieving, and so congrats to you in the team for hitting to enter customers in such a short amount of time. That's really incredible and obviously we love to continue the conversation, as I'm sure things will be changing over time at postal. Yeah, thank you. Thanks for thinking to me. This has been fun and nice to catch up as well. Awesome. All right, thanks, Lauren. Okay, thanks, bobby. Thanks for listening to growth marketing camp. If you enjoyed this episode, we'd love it if you would give it a quick five star rating or share it with a friend or colleague looking to get a little more inspiration for their next campaign. If you want to learn more about the company behind the show, had to open sensecom. That's open, sken skecom. Will catch you on the next episode.

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