Growth Marketing Camp
Growth Marketing Camp

Episode 62 · 1 month ago

How Sweater Forges a Tight-Knit Community with Lorri Kane

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to another exciting episode of Growth Marketing Camp, where we welcome Lorri Kane, Digital Engagement Director at Sweater and bestselling author of 60 Days to LinkedIn Mastery. Lorri joins us to share the story of how she became a vital part of the Sweater team and joined them on the journey of making venture capital available for everyone.

Lorri shares how she creates educational venture capital content that distinguishes Sweater from their competition. We chat about what keeps Lorri on her toes, what work-life looks like in a venture capital startup, and how she’s building Sweater’s presence across all platforms. To hear all this and much more, tune in!

Welcome to growth marketing camp, podcast powered by open sense, where we sit down with leaders and founders from diverse backgrounds in marketing, tech and beyond to explore what it takes to build a leading brand that's shaving the world of B Two B let's get into it. Hey, everybody, this is jazz bating, Co host of Growth Marketing Kip. Welcome to another exciting episode where I'm happy to welcome Lori Kane, who is currently the digital engagement director at sweater and a best selling author of sixty days to linkedin mastery. Lorie, it's great to have you on the show. Welcome, hi, thank you. Super excited to be here. I am extremely excited, but I have to first share I did read what. I was kind of doing some research and try to learn about you. Um, and very, very curious. I don't know if I'm going to pronounce it properly, but I heard your favorite word is new. Yes, yes, so it's it's a song that the band cool made, but I loved it before tool made that song. I'm just gonna trove it. They got that idea for me. So it's it's Greek for the the vital life force that connects us all, and so it's something that I just I really feed off of energy. I love giving and receiving and just with the endurance athlete part of my life, being out in the mountains and connection just brings about some positive, awesome energy, and so I started looking for a word that would describe that, and Numa Numa it is, and so that's kind of the way I live my life, you know, just like the energy in the universe. I absolutely love that. So it's a thank you for teaching media word. I had no idea what that word is. I've also not heard that song, so I'm gonna have to have to listen to it later. Yes, you know, you mentioned that you're like a nature you're a nature person, you love to be out by and you're very athletic. You hold very athletic too. I need to to start moving. That I noticed ever since like I don't move. I bought an apple wastch to promote to encourage me from we actually living in Vancouver, so I've got like a beautiful, like hype around me of Lake Surround me, which I don't fully take advantage of. But I'm kind of curious. Where are you at right now I'M IMPROVE WITH UTAH. So the base of the wasatch mountains. Beautiful, beautiful. I mean, first of all, there's no other place you can be like skiing in the mountains in the morning and then you can drive down to the red rocks and be in the pool side, right. But my love is in the mountains and exploring them all up and down the wasatch front, so Salt Lake, Utah County, all over and beyond even yeah, it's hilarious that I was thinking about it because obviously I'm in Vancouver. It's actually traveling across Canada is a lot more expensive for Canadians than traveling into us, and so most of the Times, if I'm gonna do any traveling, I usually book a flight somewhere in the US. And I was having a conversation with someone about Utah a couple of months ago and I feel like, because my husband is so bids a nature of Boff, he loves being outside. I think he just prefers being like by himself in the wood, like ice fishing or whatever. But we were talking about and he's like Hey, I want to do like Utah or I want to do Um and I'm like, you know, what's there. I don't think that that's a place with a lot of nature. I feel like it would be a little bit dry. And then he showed me pictures. I'm like, Oh my God, it does not like I was honestly so shocked that the kind of landscape that's in Utah and the kind of place that you can get lost and explore, it's just so underrated. You don't you don't hear it and you don't people don't talk about it that much. Yeah, people. Well, we have, you know, our license plate has the Red Rock, you know, the arch, things like that, and that's what people think of when they think of Utah. But I mean we've got aspens, we've got pine trees, we've got green shut amount of time, but we have we have all of that and and I really love that...

...part of it. I'll go down south a little bit more every now and again, but yeah, I know I love it up here with Oh my gosh, right now the flowers are blooming, wild flowers everywhere, so beautiful as I can yes, well, I absolutely love it, but right now I'm very, very excited that you are on our show and I'm just kind of curious, so to introduce you to the rest of the growth marketing camp community. Tell us about where you're at right now. You're you are working at sweater. So tell me about sweater. What do you do and who is your guys audience at sweater? The sweater is a unique venture capital firm. We are democratizing venture capital. To be a venture capitalist before you had to be accredited, which costs hundreds of thousands of dollars, and buy INS were astronomical. Uh, not available for the everyday person. And Uh, and I've always wanted to be a venture capitalist, the idea of pay it forward and investing in startups and founders, helping them pursue their dreams. And so as I followed the sweater journey of making venture capital available for everyone, I got really, really excited and reached out to Jesse, the founder, and said I'm looking for a job. I don't know if there's a position for me, but I'd love to explore the option of of working with the team and and it and it happens, and we made it happen and so now I'm on the growth marketing team. Amazing. Yeah, I love, love you. How long have you been a sweater I've actually only been there since May. Okay, okay, so and absolutely, absolutely loved that and I'm super excited that you're a part of this journey with sweater. It sounds awesome. I had a chance to look at what you guys are doing on Linkedin to it all sounds absolutely amazing and good luck for the rest of your like the first few months. This is crazy. Yes, we just public so I was tired at May and we just publicly launched in June, so it was like good timing. I do there is I am with the digital engagement, is I'm running all the social media platforms, but also I am looking for and engaging and starting and hopping into the different conversations around venture capital and doing my kind of too prong. One is, since venture capital is now open to everybody, there's a lot of education. Honestly, like I was sitting at meetings like writing down notes because I had no idea what acronyms they're using or, you know, what does this word mean and what what? What is this? I've never actually been in venture capital and ministream before and so using that I'm helping to create content that educates others, because I don't know what we're talking about. Other others must not know either. At the same time explaining how sweater is different because we have different nuances. Were not like other VC firms. And so also then talking to those who have been in Entra capital for years and they're going well, well, what makes you different and having to explain the differences between us and others. And so part of that is just being in those conversations and uh, like I said, I don't I don't know everything about entro capital. I am reading lots and learning lots and then if there's something that I don't know, I I tag a teammate and say, Hey, you know what this person it would be best to answer that question. So the other side of that, though, is also talking to founders and startups, because we are investing in these newer companies. And so there's a lot of different conversations I'm involved in and a lot of different voices that I I mean, we have one message, but depending on who I'm talking to, it's a different kind it's a different twist, and so that keeps me on my toes and it's it's exciting. I love being able to just kind of be in all the conversations. Yeah, so I absolutely love that you mentioned that. And first of all, even when I came into open sense, you know, that's where I'm at...

...right, right now. It was my first SAS experience and there was so much that I that I had learned that first year, so much first, you know, even self debt. I'm like, man, I don't know anything like this is and I think my my fear of being caught of Whoa the guy's gonna realize this girl knows nothing. The build Sass Baby, just research, research, research, to the point where I was just going to all these rabbit holes and I didn't really have like my my life, my conversations, even with my friends and family, started revolving around this. And be like Jazz, get your head out of war and leave, and I'm like you guys don't understand. I'm just trying to learn, I'm just trying to talk, talk about it. So I can imagine you probably have got like information overload right now, but it's it's awesome to hear that your team is kind of supporting you and you're able to have conversations, especially it might be a lot, but you're talking to the founders. So you're getting multiple different perspectives which I'm sure three months from now, for six months from now, you're going to be now then sharing your knowledge with then the next person that comes in, which is awesome. Yes, yeah, absolutely love that. Um, I'm curious. How is the marketing? You said you're you're on the growth marketing team. How is that team structured at sweater? So we have we have the head of our our group. Um, we are we ourselves are startup. Um, I was employee number twenty one, hired, you know, in May. So we are still a start up ourselves, but we've got a great team. We've got matthew leading the charge, helping us with the talking points. He's a he's a founder himself. So that's also like, well, people are like upper management. No, no, there's it's me. And then I talked to Matthew. You know, it's true deal and that's also really cool, being like we're close. Tighten it kind of a tighten it. That was not intentional, but tighten it with sweater kind of a team. You know, we've got content strategist, Garrett, is a master at being able to craft messages, and we've got Andrew doing the design and he's amazing at like I'm like, Hey, I need a graphic for this post. You know, here's what the post is about, and he just comes up with brilliant ideas, were visuals, and we've got paid with Megan and Cam is doing the community and so it's just, you know, and we've got a great video team, Jacob and Ben Doing Amazing video work. And so right now it's that we're just all kind of a group together. There's no there's not really a major hierarchy and as far as like, you can't, you know, you have to report to this person, this person, this person. We're just we're very synergistic, I mean and at a startup, but you've got to make sure that you are, you know, pivoting and uh, scrappy, I guess, is a word that is used a lot when it comes to startups. Just being open a feedback and accepting, you know, the feedback and then being able to give feedback. And there are times when it's just like, oh my gosh, this is this is a startup and it's really stressful at times because there's a lot to do. But yeah, the team is really supportive of each other and and picks up, you know, slack whenever it's needed to. So many parallels and similarities between what you just described. I was also Um employeed over twelve a few years ago. Had Open Sense and we've definitely grown a lot. We still consider ourselves like a scrappy startup. We still, you know, I love one of the things that you mentioned that made me feel like like smile, this is why I love startups. Do is, you know, you mentioned everyone by name and I can still mention by by name at my company if I kind of share how the company is structure in the different teams and that little that's the sweet spot of, I think, working in startups, where you're still so close and everything is so visible than anytime you're working on a certain initiative. It's like people will priorities right, besides actual priorities with the different teams, everyone is working together on a common goal and you're able to kind of move forward and you still have to be okay with ebig. You you know all that. So one of the things that you mentioned to I think is the best type of camp. I personally love it. Sounds like you love it. I love it amazing and...

...you know, I'm happy to hear that this is you're just starting your journey and everybody that you're working with is supporting you. One of the things you mentioned that you are specifically like responsible for is building a precedence and connecting, you know, with the right people delivering the right message. Um, is that how you would describe what it is you do? So I'm gonna have a little challenge for you a share what you do, but in a way where your family would have to describe what it is that Laurie does, oh so, and how your parents do and how is your yeah, so well, I have four kids and the way, you know, you can ask if they were here, you could ask any you know, what does mom do for work? And they say mom posts stuff on on Linkedin and and other social media sites and then talks to people all day about what she loves about her company. So I love that. I have, even though I was trying to think of like man when I came up and I was like, what would my mom? I don't have kids, and I'm like what would what would my family say? What would my my sisters say? And that's kind of like that's that's really all that matters. It's connecting people and finding the people that you want to connect with and then connecting with them, and that's that's the partners to yeah, Um, okay, cool. So high level, walk me through, like what your week looks like in your shoes? What are you responsible? But what are the tools that you're using day in and day out? So a big, a big part of what I do is the post and social media and to to create content and to get ahead. You know, it's the whole you don't want to scramble that day with the boats. So so coming up with different ideas and different messages and kind of stringing along the different platforms of what we want to say and how we want to say it. Part of doing that, though, is also being in conversations and learning what the questions are. You know, a lot of times, you know, we can sit in a room and with a whiteboard and assume what we should post about, but one of my main focuses is to be in the conversations with our customers and online to find out what actions people have and then I take that back to the team and we're able to craft messages that then are answering the questions online and so, Um, anything organic is in my Rell knowves of duties, I guess you could say. And so that's that's a really big part. The other part, then, is I'm following the different hashtags for venture capital and an alternative assets and all these things that I am learning about as well. Uh, and then either myself, as as Lori, I have the runway to be able to jump into conversations personally or, if it if it is a sweater, a company kind of conversation, bring the company into the conversation as well and Um, and answer and respond to when we're tagged and talked about, as well as then, like as I get into those conversations that I've been talked about online. So so I love that you mentioned that. I will saying even before you were you know, we reached out to you to join us a marketing camp well before, like months months before, I totally saw you all over my feet, I don't think, and I think the reason why I remember you so much, seeing you on my feet and recognizing that it is you, is that little mountain, that mountain and Mosey that you have around, like I felt like you were everywhere and it was your post. I was like hey, this is awesome. I really like this and I remember thinking when, when Um Yelena actually mentioned to me that hey, Laurie is going to be joining the show, the moment I saw Laurie Caine, I immediately I knew it was I connected. I connected the name right to your actually visual of what I remember seeing over the last year while I've been on Linkedin. Ye. So that mountain. That mountain has two purposes. One it's personality, because I love the mountains and I bring that into my own personal brand and and that's a huge thing too. I love that that sweater. As a company, I can I can be there and promote them,...

...but then I am able to have my own personal brand and my own linkedin and it works, you know, the more that I talk, you know sweater is on my my helline as well. But the mountain also helps control bots because when the mountain is in front of when the Emoji is in front of your name, and then when bots start sending messages, they just pull the EMOJI and so when I get messages it will say either just mountain or Mountain Lori, and I know then that that's automated. And so yeah, that is a great that is a great hack. I'm trying to think of what my Emoji would be on my one STAP, the Emoji that I mostly have, like on all of my whether it's WHATSAPP or Instagram, I always have a little dog Emoji because I love my dogs. I have three. But I'll think about it. I do like that idea up. But you know, Um, what you mentioned, even like you getting exposure for yourself and building your personal brand, one of our big strategies at open sense is actually employee evangelism. So get condemn working with our team and helping them build their personal brand, because we're noticing. You know, all of that trickles down to the brand at the end of the day. So I love that. Not only are you building your personal brand, but sweater is going to enjoy, you know, extra engagement and brand awareness as a result of your efforts, which absolutely love, and theft and you're doing a killer job because again, I feel like I knew you or I even had this conversation with you. Um, and I'm sure there's a lot of people that, when they do see this episode drop, they'll feel like, oh, I already know Laurie, as I did. So Um, kind of curious you. You know, you shared that you're really responsible for finding the customers and understanding what are the questions that they have? What would you say are the most important skills in your role for having to do all of that? I think that I mean communication, but too, to be specific, to create that connection that they feel comfortable talking you know, it's not hey, I want to connect with you with an agenda to find out X, Y Z or to sell you to on sweater or anything like that. It's just, honestly, my my goal when I wake up and I go online is to find my next best friend and then I'm able to have the conversations because I truly authentically want to learn about people, their stories or questions and if I can help in any way, and if that's with sweater as the company and doing it to help them with investments, great, but anybody I connect with I have no idea if the person I talked to yesterday is going to be the person that helps tomorrow. And so it has to do with communicating, but in an authentic way that you are also listening, and that's hard to do online. It's an interesting thing and so I do like to get offline and have have calls. But yeah, so I guess the skill is just making that connection and making that people feel hard and seen without an agenda attached to somebody, because everybody deserves that. Yeah, and and you're right about that, and I think we we've been hearing for the last few years, you know this, this term authenticity and be authentic, but I think there is a very stark contrast between people who are authentic and people who are who are not right, people who are just trying to get those numbers, trying to get those opens, and I think that like actually, in your part and in your gut and in your soul, wanting to be the kind of person that you know, doesn't think about an agenda but actually genuinely wants to create a connection. That's where you can tell very, very easily if someone reaches out to me, I can tell if they actually genuinely are curious about me and they want to know about me, or if they're just, you know, it's just business for them, and you definitely considering you know you you mentioned you're the kind of person that feeds off of energy and you want to exchange energy and that's something that that tries you and motivates you. I can see why you are in this role and I can see why you're doing such a good job on Linkedin, because you're actually sharing your connecting, whether it's one on one right, if you're reaching out to your founders, if...

...you're reach different founders, if you're reaching out to your customers, the way that you have been able to build your personal brand, I linked it, at a scale where other people who don't know you feel connected to you is just a testament to that that you're doing a fantastic job. So, Um, I'm happy for you that you are exactly where you need to be. Yes, well, and that's the other thing too, is like it's sometimes a struggle with I mean, you're just boosting my ego here, so keep on doing because I love it. But it's sometimes it's interesting because I feel I feel the imposter syndrome creep in because you know, I'm part of growth marketing and a marketing team and I have a personal brand and I love connection. But then you know, when you look at my you know my connection numbers and things like that, like I don't have as many as some others, and that's comparison. That creeps in that it causes imposter syndrome. But, UM, there's very rarely a person that is on my connection list that I haven't had a conversation with first and and that's my goal, is that. You know, yes, I'd love to have a lot of friends and build a great big network, but I want anybody to be able to write me and say, Hey, do you know this person and can we can we you introduce them, and I want to be able to say yes, you know, I don't want to have a lot of friends on my list that I don't really know and can't really authentically connect with each other. And so the other part of that, though, too, is also letting people be authentic themselves. Yeah, if I can be out that dig all day long, but then when people start to get real with me, like having having that space, holding that space for them to be real and authent tabled you back. And so, yeah, it's two way street. Yeah, it is totally a two way street. And then you'll notice too, you know, even for myself, Um, actually, when I hit even come into this rold, yeah, I experienced that. I experienced the feeling of Oh Gosh, you know, you're comparing yourself to everybody else around you, and I think one of the things that you mentioned, which is I'm glad that you're also doing it, you know, trying, trying not to focus on scale or focus on volume. It's about those personal connections which you can't measure. It's about the impact that you can't see and the work that you're doing. Again, as someone who was absolutely ill lean to you, I had no idea who you were. I recognize you and I felt that I knew you. That already is something you can't measure. You can't measure how you know jazz binning from open sense, actually recognized me and knew me and you about sweater because of the work that I was doing. That's the stuff that's like behind the scenes that imagine. I'm just one person. You're gonna have hundreds and hundreds of stories of other marketers or other founders that have recognized you and see you and have read your post and have followed you but might not be connected to you. I'm sure that you're, you know, appearing on all of my network speeds if I'm engaging with your boss, and they're feeling that and they're seeing that. But I think you mentioned that I'm kind of curious, Um, for the work that you are doing on Linkedin, how do you identify who is worth like, I hate say the word worthy, but who that you're planning out? How do you prioritize who we reach out to? Do you have like a certain guideline for yourrself that this is the kind of Um you know, these are kind of people I want to engage with and then almost like hunt them, or you just kind of spend your time on Linkedin and then, through just ending up on a bunch of rabbit holes, you end up finding your way to the right people to engage with and build those relationships with. Well, I guess to clarify, is this for myself or for for I'd say for both, actually for both. So for myself, the best way to connect with me is to engage with my content, honestly, because the people who are liking and commenting and engaging with my content, like I want them in my I want them in my corner. Sorry deal. As far as hunting, I don't necessarily go hunt, but I do I do look at the gaps of places that I want to learn more and I will then actively go look to see either in the Lincoln search ourselves navigator or just even through friends, through the Hashtag, you...

...know, and and find people who can fill in the gaps of places that I'm lacking knowledge or or needing. For for example, I was going, okay, you know what, learning more about investing. I'd love to learn more about real estate investing, and so I started looking at Linkedin and found real estate investing conversations happening and found friends who are connected to others. So then I started the conversation with them and now I have a few really awesome people that I rely on and ask questions about real estate investing. Just gonna Call as night with someone who would give me awesome advice. That's kind of what I do, is I mean as far as hunting, yeah, I kind of look and say, okay, what is an area that I want to learn and grow in, and do any of my friends currently do that or they connected to other people? As far as the company, we have, you know, a list of, you know, different companies that we were consumer facing, consumer goods type of companies. So we're we're constantly looking all linked in and all the different platforms for startups, founders and hashtags are really my jam of how I how I find people and things like that, as far as who I network with and connect with with the sweater perspective, like I don't want to just connect with everybody and anybody myself. But there's really, I guess, really the answers. There's there's not really a you can be a part of of what we're you know what we're talking about. STARTED IAL UM so as it come be. Yeah, we we invite everybody to follow along and follow the page because you never know where they are in their in their journey. But like you can sit with us vide absolutely. Yeah. So the short and sweet is so first four sweater. You know hashtags and all the different platforms is the best way to look for the people who are who are talking about the different subjects and and that you're interested in in gathering more followers from. That kind of leads me to which you basically answered it. Unless you have another one. I was gonna ask what's an underrated tool that you that is indispensable for your job, and I feel like hashtags are, because I actually think about Um. We we started using like hashtags more often, but you're right, it's you know, you forget especially if you're not doing a lot of community work. You forget that that is there to tap into a community besides hashtags and Linkedin, because you you spend most of your time on Lincoln. Are you using other tools about social listening or anything else, any other underrated tools that you're using too to be better at your job? Yeah, well, all of a sudden, real quick to the other idea of the hashtags that I use on on all the platforms, so instagram, uh, we're on instagram and facebook as well as twitter. Just started to talk Linkedin, is that when you are able to use a Hashtag that is a little bit more niche, then you can find the people who are following you. So we started using sweater, Hashtag, sweater weather, whenever we are talking specifically about us and our company and updates and things like that. And so whenever somebody felt because that was that was not a Hashtag than anybody else was using. And so as we've started to use that Hashtag and we, you know, follow the Hashtag for updates on the company, sort of a call to action, we've been then able to see. We can't see the names on Linkedin, but we can see how many followers we can see. That's that's kind of a way we use, you know, tracking of who who was following us, and that number grows and grows. So hashtags again, the big way is to look, you do the search of Hashtags, but the other way is that when you use Niche Hashtags, you can see followers that are are added to that little group. Other other tools. Sparked true is one that I love to use. Really are a huge fan of that. Thank you. Thank you for greeting up, because that that gathers, you know, if somebody's following this company or...

...looking looking up, you know, listening to this podcast, I'm able to find who else, amongst all the different platforms and different things that are related to that, that word or the podcast or the influencer, things like that. I have to CON representative with you, Spark Toro. Absolutely love him, absolutely love what rand did with that community and building that out huge inspiration. We absolutely love him and we used spark Tori when we were even building up our strategy for growth marketing camp to learn and try to understand, okay, how can we actually reach out? How do we find these people? Where do they live? What are they talking about? What you care about. So, whatever said, that's definitely, I can an indispensable tool. Ye, Um, shifting the conversation a little bit to focus on you and your role. I know you did mention you know you've also had experienced certain beats of like imposter syndrome or you you came into a brand new space and you're learning and you're kind of soaking everything in. Um, maybe, if you're looking back at your career and all that you've done so far, if it's possible for you to come up with like one valuable lesson that you've learned that would you be willing to share with our community as it stands where you are right now? I think that, uh, just one. Let's see. The big thing is surrounding the impostive syndrome and the thing that I've learned, because I I even went not only into a space venture capital. They don't really understand. Like I went from freelancing. This is my first ever like actual real job that I've ever had. was doing the mom thing and it was Adam Grant. He wrote a book called think again, and in there, like I didn't even think this was a supposed to be a main part of the book, but he talks about how imposterive syndrome can be flipped and to use it as instead of getting anxious about not knowing, look at it as a positive growth mindset, that, instead of stressing about, oh my gosh, I don't know anything and feeling like you don't belong, look at it as how you have so much runway to learn and grow. Like get excited about that, and I think that's been a huge theme through my life. You know, when I was interviewing for jobs, going for freelancing, I I am so grateful for the first two interviewers because I I bombed the interviews. Oh, I've just been freelancing, so I haven't had corporate experience, and just like listen all the reasons why it would not be good for the good jobhood. And each one of them came back and said, no, you know what, here's the deal. Like what's your freelancing work? You know how to work with teams, you know you're easily molded, you've worked with everybody from the lowly employee to the executive, and you've worked in several different industries and with different departments, and so like they actually were like selling me on how good I feel them, and so I'm forever grateful. Um. But yeah, just don't sell yourself short, like if you have questions and you feel like you don't understand. First of all, nobody really does, like, because what worked yesterday doesn't doesn't necessarily work tomorrow. We're all pivoting, we're all testing. But also don't look at those questions as a negative look at it as a great start to the growth mindset and the amazing opportunity you have to learn. And so that's that's something I have to I'm gonna I'm gonna replay this over and over again this episode. That's for by myself, because I forget it often. Yeah, I think that you don't. You don't have to replay it, because we're gonna take that where you can share it and we're gonna share it all over you. You can see the soundbites. You will remember this forever and so will the rest of the community. I gotta say, the growth mindset and also, you know you're sharing. Don't sell yourself short. I have had my fair share of experience working as a freelancer. It is not easy. At your based...

Glee an entrepreneur, you're having to do so much and balance so much. It's almost as crazy as working in an agency and you learned so much. So I am very, very happy that, hey, if you bomb those first three interviews, that they shared that piece of advice for you and you remember that, because working as a freelancer is probably one of the best skills that you could learn in an actual world working with other people, you know, in a corporate environment or a startup. And I'm telling you, like, man, you need to have thick skin to be able to be a freelancer. The grass never greener. When I work working, you know, a full time job in a larger organization, and I'm like, man, I just wish I could do my own thing when I'm working as a freelancer, like marriage, wish I could just shut off my rate at five o'clock. You end up working back in the larger organization. Man, I just want to be to start up. This is so Gor and then it's hearted, but it's like man, I would really love to you know, being something that's a lot more organizing structure, and it's like the grass never greater Um, but all the experiences that you're sharing a hundred percent like that stuff is so so important and I also one of the one of the guests that we had, my girlsmen had shared. If you are not experiencing imposter syndrome or if you're not feeling insecuring your job, you've been at that job far too long. You're in that role, you've outgrown it. It's time for you to move on, it's time for you to feel that discomfort. Um So, yeah, own it on the discomfort and, instead of it taking you over, to take it over. And I had experienced it when I had moved into this role. I had experienced like physiological changes in my actual body because of facts, because of the stress of like a new job and a new role, until I realized, man, I'm just making like if I'm spending all my time stressing about this, that's energy expended from me. I might as if I'm gonna expend the energy, why expend it on, you know, something negative? Might as well just be on something positive and feel good about it. Um So, I love that. What is your brand, Um, your personal brand? What do you want a legacy to be? How do you want people to remember you when they think about Lori King I. I think I've said a few times that I just, you know, I was their best friend. You know, I really I wake up every day and that's what you know, going to networking events online, just meeting people, because I can connect dots to connections that have helped me to get to where I am. And so my legacy is just, you know, connecting. I love to connect people to people or ideas or opportunities. You know, I actually like this is kind of uncomfortable for me because I don't necessarily to be in the limelight like I like. I would love to connect others two things that will help them be happy, because in the energy from that I can feed off of them. So, yeah, my my brand is Numa and and the energy that's created through connection. Yeah, I'm glad that you brought that up again. I love that, I really do. I I had another question which I think you already answered, but I we'll just ask it again and not assume. What's one book you'd recommend to our audience and why? And you mentioned think again, by Adam Bryant. I'm curious is that? Is that a book you would recommend to our audience? I would recommend that book. Um, I think, though, that the book that really has had a big impact on me, even just just lately or recently, is burnee Brown's gives some imperfection. That's a great book to to really help understand Um, to to work through the imposter syndrome and to work through the stress of being perfect and to shed that and and to just be okay with who you are and understanding that you've got some awesome, unique things to do. And, like you said, if you're you're too busy stressing about, you know, what you can't do or what you don't know, then that's energy wasted and so put that energy towards towards the good. Definitely definitely love that and not down. Last question before we move...

...into the fun part, the rapid fire. What do you think people misunderstand about you most, or misunderstand about your role? Oh well, my rule is definitely that, like, I'm not just playing on Linkedin and theial media platforms. I you know, I mean, I guess in part I kind of am like playing Um. So yeah, so I think that's kind of as a general social media you know, managers kind of get a bad rap. I mean their salaries are really, you know, across the board, not looked at as you know, super important, but if they're the voice of your company online, they're pretty important, and I will I will also add to make sure you add this in, like sweater recognizes that. So I I love that I have been able to have the autonomy and the responsibility and they do respect that. It's not respected enough, I think, across the board. Uh, it's not just playing online soresented. Like you know, I've been a marketer my whole career and it's the stuff that you hear me. You'll joke around if you if you Um, if you're working at a smaller any other company where even especially, if the CEOS don't understand what market does. Ay, they think all you can do is you're just gonna tweet that and they hop about it. especially I remember earlier in my career Um some of the conversations I would have with other other roles, other people in different engineers, and it's like they really make light of the stuff that marketers do, when it's like we are the face of the brand, right, the brand that you guys are busy building and the engineering team is working on and you're creating these products. Guess who's actually doing all of the work to make sure you know your your audience is finding you, the marketers. So I totally misunderstanding. I think marketers experienced the most and the love that and I'm happy to hear that sweater is doing a fantastic job recognizing that. And, Um, you don't. You personally don't have to worry about it. Um, where you're at right now? Now, rapid fire. So I mean I have a bunch of questions. Try to knock them off as quickly as you can. Usually UN rapid fire in the past GMC episodes, but I I asked them slowly and then it gives a guest time to think about it. But try to think about the answer very, very quickly. So favorite drink? Oh, Dr Pepper. Okay, Dr Pepper One. Are you most productive in the like eight to ten morning time? I see you kind of Padick there because you're trouble, I was saying. Okay, so real quick. So I am most motivated first thing in the morning, but I'm up doing my workout because if I don't do my workout then it so okay, I was gonna I was gonna say motivation firstly in the morning, where I soon aged it. I need some workout motivations added. Currently, I don't, and I need I I rely on pre workout, which I don't want to do for that. But summer or which? UH, Spring and full? Okay, all right, I did not even think about mountains. Are Lakes? Oh, mountains with lakes in them. Hey, Jasper, if you ever wanted to go to Calgary, go to Jasper. Beautiful mountains overlooking even Gorgeous Lake Pet peeve. I guess not being honest. Yeah, yeah, so that's definitely pepe mine. What ice cream flavor are you men talking the chip? Oh, I like your spirit animal. Oh, the Phoenix. Oh, beautiful. I have a pigeon named Phoenix. He rose from the ashes because he was actually sick. He was a rescuer, Phoenix. Yeah, get this on instagram. UH, one just to prepower. What would you choose? Oh, teleportation. Oh, I like that one. Yes, that was actually mine. I chose to nightcrawler from X men. He was my favorite character. One thing you can't live without. Oh, lately it's chopstick. Wow, that is so important. When...

...it gets butter persent, I got the touch of the kissing lip mask, which is the definitely picks on up and it gives the unrest of little sheen on on your livel Um, who's one role model that you have? All right, the Burne Brown would be a great role model. Yeah, alright. And last time, wherek your listeners find you online on Linkedin is the best place. That's where I hang out the most. Alright, amazing. And guess what, everybody, we're going to make sure we linked Lori Kane, and you guys are probably already seen her. If it happened, you will definitely recognize her after we like her and share all of the good stuff that she shared on gross marketing camp. But, Laurie, it was absolutely awesome to have you on the show. Love Pleasure. One of the last conversations I had with someone else from Gross Marketing Camp, she mentioned people who are energy gainers and drainers, and you know you are definitely. You give me energy and I thought that and I hope that Um this, you know, experience to the show and this conversation also gave you some life and energy, because he totally did for me. Thank you so much for being on the show. Thank you. Thanks for listening to growth marketing camp. If you enjoyed this episode, we'd love it if you would give it a quick five star rating or share it with a friend or colleague looking to strengthen their skills with tips and inspiration. You want to learn more about the company behind the show, head to open sense dot com. That's O P E N S E N S E dot Com. We'll catch you on the next episode.

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