Growth Marketing Camp
Growth Marketing Camp

Episode 56 · 5 months ago

How To Build a Strong LinkedIn Community with Brianna Doe

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this week’s episode of Growth Marketing Camp, we are joined by Brianna Doe, Senior Demand Gen Manager at Inventables & thought leader. In just two months, she went from publishing her first LinkedIn post to going viral and having over 10,000 followers.

Today, she continues to build her community with one key lesson: If you want to produce the kind of content that connects and inspires an audience, you have to do so with honesty and authenticity.

Brianna is a breath of fresh air who brings an array of perspectives to the B2B marketing world, so tune in and get inspired.

Welcome to growth marketing camp, or we sit down with our favorite marketers to do mystify growth and give you the insights to help turn your next campaign into a major success. Let's get into it here, everyone. This is jazz beinning, cohost of growth marketing camp. Welcome to this week's episode. I'm very excited to introduce you to Brianna Doe, who is currently senior De Mansion manager at inventables, where she's focused on driving growth and customer engagement. Brianna, it's such a pleasure to have you here. I'm so excited. Thank you for having me today. Yeah, no worries, and thank you so much for actually getting on his call. I know you're not feeling till this much. No worry, I was way too excited to skip. Okay, awesome, awesome, and we've been like super excited. I know I mentioned to you that I had a chance to look at your linkedin profile. There's a lot that I want to cover besides just you know what you're doing, for what you're doing at in mentables, a little bit about your background, but definitely want to cover a little bit of the success that you've had on Linkedin, especially for the last two months. So for those of you guys who don't know, Brianna has gone from almost her first post two months ago to about ten thousand followers right now who are building a community of people who absolutely love the stuff that you're sharing. So I definitely want to dig into that. First, I thought let's do a little intro and introduce you to our growth marketing camp community. So tell look a little bit who Brianna dote is and what you're currently doing. Definitely. So, I'm Brianna, mostly known as Brie. I'm based in Phoenix, Arizona, out in the desert and, as you mentioned, I'm the senior demand generation manager invincibles. So add in Med spiles. We offer an all in one CNC solution. And when you think of CNC, basically if you picture any cool side that you've seen in any custom cabinet or cool shelving, you can make all of that with a CNC machine. It was do all the carving on wood or plastic, whatever could arbatrrial you prefer. So we sell those machines. They're called the xcrve x car pro, and we also sell the design software. So you can take that idea that you have and really easily bring it to life. It's kind of like Adobe, photoshop or illustrator, but for CNC. So within reds bulls, I'm responsible for building out our customer journey for our customers who are new to CNC, for those who have full time businesses, from the first time they encounter us, whether it's over like in social or through an ad, all the way to when they purchase and as they're building their machines and building their businesses, we just want to be there for them to support them the whole way and that's that's my job in my shell. Amazing. I'm mean thing. So in terms of your guys as customers, are you dealing with like small businesses or is it just kind of all over the map? It's all over the map. So we have customers who they buy the x carve and I never use CNC before. So they want to use it to make things for themselves or make things for friends. We have customers who have parttime businesses and then those who this is their full time job. They're working with the homeowners and interior designers and you know, like remodeling kitchens or bathroom. So very amazing. I know you would also mentioned that inventables was kind of a place that you've been wanting to work at for a while. Was it just funned? What were you doing before and then what were the steps that it took you to get to inventables? It's funny, before invincibles I was an entirely different industry and I was working in web three, in Blockchain, and it's exciting right everybody's talking about web three right now, and I was doing marketing for a company that builds decentralized storage in that space and it was interesting. But I'm really passionate about working with creatives. I'm a creative myself, and so there was just something missing, to be honest. And so what I found inventables. You know, their whole or our role, mission and vision is to just give any creative the chance to express themselves in a new way and build a business out of that and make money. And so that was really what Trimmun to invinable. So, oh, the job the old fashioned way at this point. I found it just on their website. went the whole interview process and it was honestly the most enjoyable interview process I've ever had. So excited to be there. So that's...

...awesome and it's it's so interesting when you say that you were working blocking before open sense. I was also at a blockchain agency. Greatly. Yeah, yeah, it was. It's interesting. Yeah, I'll just tell you, like if you've seen the fire festibal documentary on Netflix. Yes, I is basically was working like that reptable, but I've no possibly one of the most insane, very enlightening time. I've learned a lot and learned a plot about what not to do, but it was definitely like a roller coaster and I'm sure you know you you've probably experienced, maybe not the it. I hope you didn't wells up on trial by fire. You can really get so much every day. Yeah, but yeah, what do you what do you notice? Is like the best thing now that you are at it, mentals, I know you've been here for a few months. Down what's the one thing that's really that's been driving you, something that you absolutely enjoyed what you're doing? This is so I have typically worked for very small teams and I've worned a lot of hats, so to manageneration has been a focus, but I would be doing design, photography, videography, content social. It was a lot. And so one thing that I'm really loving about this team is that, outside of the actual work I'm Doday with our customers, there's also this really refreshing like respect for each other's time and for a bandwidth, and so it gives us the opportunity to actually dive into our work because we know we know that we're supported. So I would say that's that's what I love the most, outside of the actual work. And how many people are on the marketing team? Surprisingly, up it is a small team. There's only four of us, but we work with outside agencies just to mitigate what could be very intense work. Goods well. And how is that split up in terms of your group? So I own all marketing automation and all content marketing. You have my manager, WHO's the director growth marketing, so of he oversees all of us. There's a marketing project manager who I've never worked the project manager before and I'm so spoiled down. She keeps us all in check and make sure they're always on track. And then we have our community manager and he also does a lot of our videos, a lot of the content that you see online on Youtube, primarily to educate our customers. So amazing. One of the things you mentioned earlier is that you're spending a lot of your time building up the customer journey. What does that look like in your daytoday context? So I had a very unique on boarding experience with our flagship product, the x carve. It comes to you not assembled at all. It's basically nuts and bolts. So when it came to building out the journey, I was actually sent an x carve. I built it with a lot of help for my boyfriend. Took about thirty hours and so I use that. I use all the customer interviews. I've been doing all of the research just online, through blogs and video content, as well as interviews of other people in this space, to learn not just who our customer is, but what those pain points are that we haven't been touching, what we haven't been speaking to not just when they're looking to purchase, but even after they purchase. Where do they need support? What do they love about us? What do they wish there was more of? So what they I really enjoy the invintibles community is so friendly and so kind and you there's no shortage of customers to talk to. Would you feel that first of all, I think it's absolutely awesome that they send you a machine and you have grouping together, had to do it, you with it yourself, because, honestly, there's no better way to learn than the first yand experience. Do you feel like it? Had that experience not happen and you hadn't had that opportunity to do it on your own, the customers journey wouldn't have really clicked as well. I definitely think that, especially because I didn't start talking to customers and so after I built it and there was just a I could connect them on a different level. I could have watched videos showing other people putting it together and I could have read blogs, but actually having to sit in my garage and wire a machine, I was able to connect with customers in a different way and I do think it helps them trust you more when they know that you actually haven't, you know, an in depth experience of your own. So, yeah, no, I know, I love that. So just will be your linkedin. You also mentioned a couple of things. You've had experience working in...

...content, demand, social and in search. Of those four disciplines, or maybe you have a mix. What has been your favorite and what do you think is kind of the key to success? It didn't need that area, but have to be a toss up between demand gin and content, because I just I believe there's so closely linked and they're so interwoving with each other and the key to success is pretty similar for both. I would say you need to be thorough, and that doesn't just mean, you know, making sure you have all the automations turn on properly and making sure you've tested, but also, when you're building out that customer journey, making sure you're being thorough with the content that you're providing, that it always provides value, that it's what they need, that it's not just what you assume they need with their marketing automations, making sure that it's intuitive with the way that customers engage with your products and with the company, and it's really easy, with all the tools that we have, to start the cutting corners, and so that's one thing that, without that, you're going to see issues later on, even if you don't say them immediately. Yeah, yeah, I know, I like that. And you mentioned and even tools. What are the tools that you guys are or you're using on a day to day basis to kind of help you get your work done. I should probably pay renttubs, but for how often I live in there. So I'm in UB spot quite a bit. When I came in there already some bird flow set up, but a big part of my job right now has been looking through it. We have set up, cleaning it up, implementing what else we need, and also we have separate tools like asking nicely, which we use for MPs scores, and on bounced, we use that for landing pages. So those are the three primary tools. Okay, yeah, I know I like them. I really, actually really love one bounce that. I love the community of gifficuilding too. It's an awesome it's an awesome company. It's and leak. You're based in Vancouver, which I think really yeah, I'd think. I'm pretty sure. Don't go we it's awesome. I kind of want to ship gears a little bit and focus a little bit on the community you personally are building on Linkedin. I think that will be hostile. So why don't you share a little bit about first of all, your here. You share a story about your even head to tendency on sharing your your experience and your story on Linkedin and then kind of what motivated you share that first post and what your journey has been like since then. Definitely it's been exciting. I I'm pretty sure I originally signed up for Linkedin like for or five years ago, and I've always just been a lurker right. You Log on, you look for jobs, you maybe see what somebody's posting and you log off. It was not my primary social media tool and over the years I've just been really fascinated by the people have built communities on there and I started to reach this point where I wondered if I had something to say. You know, I've been a marketing for quite a while and, to be frank, I struggled with having confidence in my abilities, even though I had the accomplishments to back it up, and so I reached the point where it felt like I was keeping my I was muting myself, and I wanted to give it a try and see what would be like to do it for myself. You know, there's so much encouragement on their people are always saying just go for it, just start, nobody will care. Like just give it a try and when I started, the very first post did go viral, just slightly work fying. I wanted it to be like just dipping my toes in the water and as an introvert like this is a bit much, but also really exciting and as I start to build out content, it's interesting how it takes out in a life of its own, just like a dozen marketing I thought I would only talk about marketing tactics, but there's I've had a very colorful career and I've learned quite a bit through interviews and different experiences and I've noticed that there's kind of a gap right now for people that need more information about that and who need to feel encouraged and empowered as they build their career. So that's kind of the direction that's gone, with a bit of marketing mixed in there, which is it's exciting. So it it is totally exciting, and so I'm kind of curious that first bulls that went viral did that that encourage you to kind of try to create more content within that realm where you decided, hey, I've got a mix up things I want to share. Slowly start trickling a couple of you know, doabling a couple of different topics, but I'm...

...just trying to figure out how you're now able to tweak your own personal content strategy or you just sharing things based off of, like what you're feeling like the day you end up posting? It's good question. I originally start off treating it like a marketing experiment, so I was testing out different types of content and seeing what resonated. But since it is my personal content, I was also seeing what felt right and I was really bored when I talk about marketing all the time. I think a big part of that is because I do it every day. I do it all day and there's so many different aspects to our careers right and we're more than just the job that we do every day, and so it was really nice to see that what I was really passionate about posting was what was also resonating and people were sending dm saying thank you for posting this. I could really touched me or resonated and as I've kept going, I've been able to focus in on what I love talking about. No, I love that and I honestly am, I wouldn't hundred percent in agreement with you. I feel like, as someone who consumes content on Linkedin, I also am starting to write I'm writing more if I feel like I have something valuable to add or if a funny story or whatever it, I'll share it. But the stuff that resonates most with me is when people are being real or just sharing non just that's is the failures feel like there's a dime, like every single person is sharing marketing tactics and you can there's just a google search away hundreds of different type of tactics and honestly, what works for someone may not work for you, but yes, it stop you're sharing. And the stuff other kind of thought leaders and influencers on Linkedin are starting to share that kind of you know, if they're not, they could really apply to anybody because it just it absolutely makes sense and honestly, some of the stuff that you've shared, when I've read it, I'm like, I bet you there are people who needed to hear that at that moment, and so there's something about that that is just so inspiring and also very empowering that I'm happy that a lot of people are starting to share and starting to kind of be a little bit more honest and more open and authentic. I also have to say, which is amazing, and I'm starting to love seeing this. There aren't a lot of people who are of like, you know, mixed backgrounds or colored people. There's you don't see that we're people. Let me posting out, you know, if we always kind of see the same mix of like my feet is always like it's kind of looks the same, and so when I see something different on my feet, I'm like yes, you know, makes me happening, but I love that. I love that more people are starting to post, and maybe they've been, but you just don't see the algorithms. Don't wish it out exactly. Yeah, I appreciate you saying that, because that's something that I noticed to and it that is probably a part of why it took me someone to post. You know, you're seeing the same be diplomatic about it, but you're seeing the same person or type of post all the time and it doesn't really seem like there's a space for you. Right. And what I think is really powerful about Linkedin is for me, I don't know about other people, but you know, on instagram and facebook you can follow celebrities, right, but on Linkedin you can follow people that inspire you to build your career and they're only like what click away and you can learn more about them and how they got to where they are, and the more people I see taking advantage of that and telling their stories, it just becomes an even more dynamic platform. So I love it. I love it too. I was also the same boat as you. Early on I felt like, you know, what do I have to what do I have to share that as of value compared to some of the other people I've seen, the other people that I would see, though, they had been posting a link did for God knows, however, yeah, right, they had built a big following, and so I just would compare myself to them and think what, you know, what do I have to offer that that they haven't already offered? But it wasn't until like making a first post. I think my first post, my first real post, was just so ridiculous. This with about my experience at that fire festival company. I was like a I called my pizza party post from because every time they would lay people off, because it's one cryptold just started to tank, they would buy pizza for the whole company. Stop seriously, not joking. Yeah, so whenever I co workers would smell pizza, we'd know someone on our tea was going to be let go. So such traumatic could if...

...there in the very honestly, I had a very negative experience. Whatever I would spell pizza. I don't blame you. I would too. Yeah, and last thing before I move on to the next posted. But the people who would end up getting let go, they didn't even get a slice. Are You hidding? I think didn't just get like a like a slice or a box to take her home. That you don't get a slice. And I remember we ended up kind of walking like we left during lunch and left the pizza in the office because our team got let go, and so we say, you know what, forget about this pizza, we're going to take you guys out for Vizza. And it was like, you know, I'm kind of like a bad move. That's ridiculous, though. It's ridiculous. Yeah, but that was one of those things where almost like you experienced just absolutely going viral. We had one, you know, one million plus views, and then it's like man, time to jump in with both feet. All right, yeah, exactly. And how do you follow that up, right? I mean, is this it like, should I just stop and all its? Let's wonderful about this experience which reminds me very much about what I'm seeing on Tick Tock right now. I absolutely love tick talk, by the way, fame, but there's so many people who they just made one video and all of a sudden it would absolutely viral and they had thousands and thousands of people following them. I remember the first video I had share was my dog and it was I for not the name of the song. I'm not even gonna try to sing it right now. I remember my goal was to use tick Tock and start sharing marketing tips, and I remember I was like, oh well, I don't know how to use it, so let me just test it out. I test used to video of my dog. I went to sleep. The next morning I had three hundred and fifty thousand views on that video. My God ad to like fifteen or sixteen hundred followers and fiftyzero likes. They were all dog lovers. Were then harding and I remembver and great I can't. I either have to follow my dog around like twenty four seven and start building dog CONTRAC or I have to start a new tip top for myself. Basically, I tried to mole of my knock around. It just didn't end up working out. I did. It's very Sassy, but that's one of those things where I guess if I actually put in the work and I got him dog costumes, maybe I think you could have been a dog. He could have been an influencer right now. So it's not like that's one of the thing that I love is same things happening on linkedin and again, the stuff that you've been sharing. I'm absolutely loving it and I want to kind of now transition a little bit. Won't focus on career. Awesome, because I'm sure you've got lots of lessons, considering the the background you have. What has been good valuable lesson that you've learned in either the current role that you're at or just in your career in general? I would say the most valuable lesson has been to let somebody else say no to you. Whether I was looking at applying for a job or wanted to run a new test or experiment, or wants to try something new with our branding, whatever the case may be, I needed to stop be the one to say no to myself and put myself out there and just see what happens. It's the same thing with testing something right, whether you're testing new ads or testing a new email campaign, whatever the case may be. It's okay to try, and that's how you learned. And if I had applied that in my career more when it came to applying for jobs, who knows where to be. I could be Cmo of like marvel right now. Probably not, but in theory you never know until you try. So that's something that I've been able to really mirror in my day to day yeah, I love that you say that, because one of the posts that you actually shared that that it really stuck with me. He said rejection is redirection. That's basically kind of like what you're saying right, like don't be the one to do it yourself right, get rejected. You know what, yourself signal the opportunities where someone else is doing it. And Yeah, of first you could be the CMO of market ever. Now to pivot real quick. I asked this question to one of my co workers yesterday, but if you had to choose one superpower, what would it be? Oh my gosh, it is can't be marketing related. I'd probably choose mine control. As I say, I don't know if that's a superhero or super villain, but I feel like that could be a fun one, right because then, yeah, I go with...

I go with my control, or like flying would be Qui. Flying would be very cool. Mind control would be very cool too. I was thinking first like teleportation, kind of like nightcrawler. That's it, and then I decided I would actually love to be able to have conversations with animals. I thought that would be very cool. Oh, that would be a good one. Right to the opportunities are so empless, they really are. They really you could learn a lot about someone to by their superheroes. So I like your mind pool and knowing that it would be coming from you, you would probably force people to have a little bit more confidence in to do how, you know, the self doubt exactly, I would they would be applying for every job they wanted, but I like that. So I just kind of want to shift gears and talk a little bit about kind of a fun question I like to ask marketers. The answer always differs based off of the company that you're an act or curnch challenges you're dealing with. So question is, what is it one thing that marketers should stop doing that they're currently doing or start doing that they're not. I would actually combine the to and say market should stop assuming that we know our customers better than they know themselves or in general, and we should start talking to them more, and not just talking to them via social media or when we send an email out, but intentionally setting up conversations with them, coming to those conversations with a list of defined questions and knowing what answers you want to have when you walk away from the conversation, because the more you get to know your customers, when you're actively listening to them and asking those specific questions, the more personalized and supportive that journey can be for them. You know, people talk a lot now about authenticity with brands and I think it's becoming a bit of a buzz word, but it's still true. Right and in this same and age, we know when we're being sold to and we know when a brand actually cares. Same thing with sustainability, like you know when a brand is just faking it and you know when they are actually interested in it. And if you're taking the time to have those conversations, that will come through in your marketing and customers will appreciate it and you'll see you'll see the impact. No, I love that in it. One of the things I'm actually a little bit curious about when you're having conversations with your customers to try to understand where their pain points are, and you're doing it under the intention of maybe developing content, how do you specifically especially at and mentabals what you're doing right now? How do you prioritize, because I'm sure you get tons of ideas, most people do when they're doing customer research. How do you decide, Hey, this is the kind of content that actually want to create, or this is when I'm going to cheat shift my focus to even all of the myriad of ideas that you've got? Any primatize that? What's interesting about these customers is that you'll start to see a trend, like we get a lot of ideas and they're wonderful, but you'll get ten or twenty people saying the same thing. Like if we send out a survey, without a doubt they'll phrase it differently, but they'll be looking for more content about how to start a business or I don't know how to work this specific thing on the machine. Can Somebody help me? And so that close us into okay, we need more training content in general. So it's seeing the bigger picture, what customers are saying and what they're asking for, and applying that in a way that resonates with them and with others. So it's been fun. No, I love that. I love that. All right. Next question. If you had to x the staff budget or time, which would you choose? And what by? Oh my gosh, that's a quote. I would say time. Our team is so we're small, but we're very mighty and if we just had more time, I don't even know what we could accomplish. Also, I like working with a small team, so I would not want eight of us, but we have the budget, the time would be a game changer. I mean we could dive into more advertising, we could get into TV and I would probably go to every trade show out there that's relevant. Yeah, okay, well then, in that case your super power should be to free time with Peopleh my Gosh, you're right, my control. What am I talking about? Yeah, I feel funny. I say that because my like co worker had said freeze time and I'm like, what do you do in free start, let you go to drade shows. A hundred percent shifty, a...

...little bit more. Now. Who are some of your role models? I know you mentioned there are people that even you are inspired by, and what do you love about them? So minjay orms is to me, Menja orms is what I think like celebrities are to other people. She's the VP of marketing at Linkedin, and that in and of itself is impressive, which has a very, very inspiring career, but she's also one hundred percent herself and she's brought who she is like personality wise, looks wise, she always has hair. She brings that whatever role she's in, and that's you don't see that often, right and being like to be honest, being a black woman in marketing or at any career, it's important to see people embracing who they are and not hiding any piece of that. So I'm really inspired by her as a marketer and just hers a person. And Bozma Saint John, who was the Cemo of Netflix and she left a couple months ago. I had a stint as a bit of a job popper to some people. I do not consider it that, but she also built a career for herself with some of COR relatively short stints at different companies and just had this really amazing trajectory. And one thing when misconception I think people have about, you know, leaving companies is that you're leaving because you're lazy or you're leaving because you you don't you're not committed right at the companies can't trust you. That's not necessarily the case. There are a lot of factors that go and to leaving a company and it's never easy. And so watching her career has just been therapeutic in a way. You know what, it makes me feel more confident decisions that I make. No, I love that. And in terms of like people leaving companies, What's interesting about that is that's like an old school thought and I'm gonna was starting to see people because more, you know, I we think about like our parents generation. They'd stay at a company for like twenty plus years or ten plus. Yes, I know when I first started my career I would. I guess compared to some of my friends, I look like I was leaving jobs more often, but I would stay there for about a year. I was like it was really nothing more I could do. Like I would either leave it, unless there was like serious politics. If I was working at a place or it just wasn't like it was a bit of a toxic environment, like the fire festival places. I would usually leave if I felt that there was no more challenge. Is Meaning for me. But back then I feel like people saw it as a fault of the person leaving less of the faults the company. But it's definitely starting to change now, which I'm lot it is. It's such an interesting mindset. Yeah, I mean I look at like my friend's parents. They put up the same company for forty years, which is admirable, and then I look at my career right because even some of my friends I'm in a similar spot as you, where I used to leave after about a year, year and a half, bilt on a growth plan. I knew what I wanted to accomplish and I know when I don't feel challenged anymore. So I think it's I think it's healthy, but I've heard this is more to make because healthy, yeah, represent and and you're when you're moving from when you've moved different industries, when you've had different jobs, you're also coming into that new company with way more knowledge and insight then someone who's probably there for thirty years, because you end up kind of inefficiable right if you're if you're out of like spirit, not saying it's a bad thing, but unless you're actively seeking, like a were, getting inspired by the outside world, a lot of times you end up just being sold absorbed in your industry and your company and then everything starts to look and sound the same exactly. Yeah, fresh perspectives are really important in any industry and I've a lot of respect for companies that recognize that. Yep, one hundred pound. I'm totally there with you. If you could do it all over again everything your career, where you at right now, would you change anything and if so, what would it be? I would change something. It's interesting. I don't think I would change the companies that I've worked for, but at the same time, I would change my mindset as I interviewed and as I searched for drops. I was not by...

...that. I was not as intentional as I am now about the job search and I'm thankful for all my experiences, good and bad. Right they make you who you are professionally and personally. But it's interesting to look back and like see how much I didn't care about like I didn't have deal breakers and didn't have red flags that I didn't have a lot of confidence in my ability. It's right. So that's what they would change. Just being more intentional, which is what I did this time, but I was very upfront about that with invincible holds where I work. So No, I love that and I love that and it's like I think you experienced it every time. I especially earlier in my career. It was that moment in the interview when you're so close, maybe your two or three interviews in where you were. Basically, if I remember, I would prep myself mentally and it's say, okay, here's what I'm going to say, whether it's salary or start date, benefits, anything, I would prep and then when I be in the hot seat and I know I'm so close and I want it so bad, I would just abandon. I have a body, and then has so often to the point where I remember, if I was doing some interviews at home, I would have it on a piece of paper. So then you just you know and I would highlight it as a do robe. If you cannot, don't use your own brain jazz, just robotically read off of this and I would still abort. I would still aboard mission, because it's that you know then doubt that you have instead of thinking, you know what, do they deserve me? Right? Do they deserve my skills, my experience, my attitude, my work ethic? It's more of I don't deserve them, so I will just do whatever it is if they want me to do. Yes, and that is shifting so much and I'm very fortunate right that most people are trying to recognize that. But I love that you're the first person, I think you've had a growth marketing camp who wants to change mindset. That's interesting and that's it's so funny because I did the exact same things. I would put a post it note after a while on my laptop, turmine myself a Pranna. Just say it. You know what salary want, whateber, and that I would K I or I would even bring it up, and it's you know, I I help friends with job interviews and press. My his not that, and I compare interviewing to dating. You know, when you're on a fir state, it's not about if they like you, it's about if you like them. Do they deserve it's one more time with you. It's the same thing with a company. You know, it's not just about you payving and giving them everything they want and not saying a word and just accepting whatever they offer. But you know you have what your doing your career or your years in you have something to offer. There's a reason why they want you. So ask what you want. I mean if it's reasonable, if it's within the market, you know you deserve it. So yeah, no, I love that. So going to move to fun questions, because it's Friday and I thought on your linked it to you love true crime, Podkaas and it be I loves. I'm well, I've gotten one true crime podcast that I absolutely on the boom. So, curiously, here what yours is and then I'll trade you mine. Perfect. I am obsessed with crime chunky. Okay, what am I end Morbid happening? It's more of it. Okay, I've not heard of either, so I'm going to know those. Don't I am obsessed with sword and scale, swordids. I've never heard of that one. It doesn't have to. Yeah, it is absolutely yeah, the guy does a fantastic job with a lot of his episodes. I posten to it a lot more when I would drive to when I would you meet to work such a great podcast, so I thought, hey, I'll email it to you anyways, but you, yes, please. It's actually done very, very well. What is your favorite movie? Oh my gosh, and I just have this conversation with my cowork I'm like, who, what are your top three movies? That's like question turn. He could not get put. You couldn't pick, he couldn't pick. But we did exchange a couple of like movie ideas. I think we mentioned a showshank reduction, which on one Green Mile Lord that I love. Lord of the Rings, I am don't really during Dunkin. Yeah, okay, we're gonna have to talk about this more, because I would on a Lord of the Rings Study Abroad Trip Right. Yeah, I went to New Zealand and they took us to all the film locations. I bought the scarf. It was made from the same sheep's wool as the one twin dodgie. Yeah, he I'm...

...a huge Lord the Rings Fan too. So there's so beautiful. I could talk about those movies all day. I might pick that trilogy. I have so many movies that I love, but when I think about the movies that I go back to, it's return of the king. Yeah, I could just watch it over and over again. Yeah, no, I absolutely I love return of the king and all the other ones, and I might actually, maybe it's easier. What's your favorite movie genre? Who? Okay, psychological thriller, who I loved like a log. Yeah, do you have favorite? Oh Gosh, I've recently liked. Well, I did love Shutar Island. I thought it was dusk good. Well, I abso love that. I did really like the get out, like I loved ghetto. I thought it was done with really good good. I haven't seen one recently, but my favorite genre is either psychological driller or fantasy, like some sort of pace. Okay, I also love horror, but I kind of enjoy like the fantasy whorror. So my favorite horror movies actually pants that I don't even if pants laborathe would be considered horror, but some people are preach oil by it. Yeah, movies, beautiful. It is a is a very, very amazing movie. Absolutely love that movie. How about yours? What's your favorite? So I feel to hear the shining, so I think it's more thriller than horror, but I would say shutter island. Actually, I also love for though. Some really into the conjuring and Annabelle Franchise. Think they'd get really well done. If you look for any TV show, the outsider on HBO was this really Nice Mix of like thriller, horror and fantasy. Okay, it was so good I don't think they're doing a second season, which is really sad, but it's definitely worth watching. All right, I needed a new shows, so I just noted that down perfect. Last question. What do you want to make happen like in the world or, you know, as as your personal rand? What's something in your career or in the world? What is something that you want to be like your legacy? I want to empower more introverted professionals to take those steps into leadership. I think the traditional workplace really caters towards extroverts and there's a lot of power in both personality types and any combination of the two. And there's also an element of introverts needing to like steppence that power more and recognize that just because you're quieter or just because you don't like talking like me, doesn't mean that one you shouldn't talk or to that you don't have something to share. You don't have some to contribute and leadership doesn't have to look like it all is did in the past. That shouldn't. So I would I would love to see more of that. What it would inspire me too, as an introvert. And Yeah, so I love that. So I come off as very much of an extrovert. I definitely am, but I do realize. I realize that around people louder than me, I'm very shy. I can I've a little bit more because I'm like wow, these Flore I could have. But I am one hundred percent in agreement with you about there shouldn't be a specific mold that people have to fit into. When I had also can on this leadership roll, there were a couple of times where if I'd be talking to or if I would did do a call in front of my like if I'd be at my parents house or even my husband, he'd say, Hey, jazz, like turn it down, you know, you're too much of a goof and I was like why? He's like Yuh, be a little bit more like, you know, director. I'm like, directors can be goofs. Exactly? What does that even mean? Right? It's kind of an old school mindset. Same Way as if there's inerverts. You know, I've even on art marketing team. There's introverts, there's extroverts, and when I think about even the work that I'm doing at the company that I'm at, I want to make sure that I'm not behaving like everybody else who's, you know, need leadership at my company if that means I'm quiet, if I'm going to be quiet in a table filled with, you know, all of them, but I'll approach them later on and I get my stuff done, that's different. Right. I've worked in companies where mostly the people that were in leadership, especially when I was at the Fire Rustle Company, they kind...

...of all look the same and most of the companies that ad worked at and the managers that I've had in the past have always a either put on a very brave face hole the time. It was never no one was ever showing any hesitancy, any doubt. Never saw it. Always saw the same flavor of people. But it's impossible, right. We don't live in a world where there's the same flavor of people, whether it's how you physically look, the kind of clothes you're wearing, the kind of style you have the kind of hair you have, right, right, so I absolutely love that. That would be your legacy and I think we're seeing again, you know, we mentioned our feeds are I'm starting to see more difference my feed, whether it's introvert or physical appearance. Hundred percent full respect for that. I absolutely love that. Yeah, you make a really good point. It's basically think about the fact that it's easy to tell people looks being more confident, like you can do whatever you put your mind to. That's really difficult to do if you're not seeing it reflected by anybody else that looks like you or sounds like you or you know anything like that. It's hard to be the trailblazer right in every situation, and so the more we really lift up people around us, regardless of their personality type or what they look like, we're just going to create a more dynamic workplace and I'm so excited for it because this is not the craziest my hair will be getting. So I need some more. I need some more people to walk their good and love it. So what's going to peet? Okay, maybe this is the last question. What's gonna the next hairstyle? You're going to do so. I'm going to keep this color like face and SI blue at the bottom, but that I'm going to add in some rainbow just to you how I feel about it. I've always been very like conservative with it. I only have shades of Brown in the back, but I'm going to keep adding a more color until somebody says it's a little bright. You know, maybe you should. I honestly, I absolutely left love it and right now the trend is you know, I don't know if you've seen it, the girls are putting we used to do it back and I'm sure if used to do it to you know, those little string plat those, Yep, though, iridescent plastics. I'm seeing that people are going there getting the little tiny iridescence plastic dreaded in their fair. I've seen that. It's betty thin. It all comes full circle. I saw the bump it picked out the other day. Lass like, what is happening? Yeah, what is that? Tick Tock, conclude to Addison. She's about is why? Yes, yeah, that's all that. All the comments were like like stop, I saw the same one. I was definitely one of the people who was so like. I definitely did not get rid of my middle. I did not treat a Middle Park. I can't my side port. Yeah, and I was not for the wide leg jeans, but now I have why bug Jean, and part of the reason in my friends who make fun of me all the time. They're like jazz, get off of Tick Tock, because you're except lot. Is what the cool kids are doing. I know I sound like a tick tock or now. Yeah, but I'm glad that has got a fellow Tick Tock R now I know you, so it real good. You and me can bulked rock our style that we're learning off tick tock and exactly, and maybe will buy bumpets. Can you imagine with a bunch of Braids in the Front? I'll do it, I'll try it, I will do it. If you do it, I will definitely do a deal. But that really it was awesome having you on a podcast. This is actually my favorite conversation and I'm mad that we ended up having it on a Friday because now we're rowayingcose it again. I hope you feel better and I hope you also enjoyed your time. I grow with macreat camp. This was so much fun. I really appreciate it. Hope you get to chat again? Yeah, we definitely will. And how can people connect with you on Linkedin? Oh, so, my name is Branda DOE. The URL might be we'll link. Yeah, we'll link. Okay, yeah, Branda DOE, just like John Doe, and connect with me. Send me a DM. I love tweeted people. So yeah, hundred percent. You guys. Thank you again, and we will chat with you guys next to you. Thanks for listening to growth marketing camp. If you enjoyed this episode, would love it if you would give it a quick five star rating or share it with a friend or colleague looking to give a little more inspiration for their next campaign. You want to learn more about the company behind the show, had to open sensecom. That's OPE. En Se en secom will catch you on the next episode.

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