Growth Marketing Camp
Growth Marketing Camp

Episode 59 · 5 months ago

How to Create Standout Digital Content with Travis Tyler

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week on Growth Marketing Camp, we welcome Travis Tyler, Senior Digital Content Producer at PandaDoc and the host of one of our favorite podcasts, The Customer Engagement Lab. Travis is the engine behind PandaDoc’s video content strategy, with the goal to grow their audience and build brand awareness.

In this episode, Travis covers what’s the key to success in creating digital content, the most important skills to have in order to crush it in this role, and shares the story of his one-hit-wonder on TikTok. As a very special bonus, he shares his advice on creating opportunities for yourself and advancing your career, and how he deals with & overcomes self-doubt. Dig in!

Bound. Welcome to growth marketing camp, or we sit down with our favorite marketers to do mystify growth and give you the insights to help turn your next campaign into a major success. Let's get into it. Hey everyone, this is jazz binning, cohost of growth marketing camp. Welcome to another exciting episode where I am Stope to welcome Travis Tyler, who is currently senior digital content producer at panda doc and a host of one of our favorite podcasts, the customer engagement lab. Travis, it's a pleasure to have you on the show. From one podcaster to another. Welcome. What is up? It's good to be here. It is awesome to have you. I know we've already had a conversation a little bit and there's stuff that I definitely want to cover, but before I move into learning a little bit about you, I would love for you to kind of share a little bit about what Pana dock is. I don't think really an intro is needed, but from your words, I think it would be awesome to understand what it is you guys do. For sure, Payton dock is a top ranked e signature digital document tool primarily geared towards small and growing businesses and we help over, you know, fortyzero businesses try to eliminate workflow and efficiencies and bureaucracy, and our mission is to build the most intuitive platform that automates everything from agreement's transactions document driven workflows. And you know, for those who aren't familiar with the space, we're just like the most badass version of Docu sign for small businesses, and my team will kill me for saying that, but it's what most people who don't know about e signatures tend to connect with. So just going to say it anyway. First of all, I love that you're brave enough to to even mention it, but that is honestly like the best way to describe it, because I've I know of panda doc now, but like the first time I learned about me signatures, like off my back in two thousand and twelve or two thousand and thirteen, Docu sign was like the big guy that you would hear about. Absolutely yeah, and you guys are the Badass version of them, so that's even better. You guys are docuside leveled up exactly. And then what are you specifically doing at Pandad? So my role is to create digital content, which includes videos, tick talks and, most importantly, our podcast. We put out about an episode every week or every other week, and my goal is to grow our audience and build brand awareness for panadoc through multimedia content. Amazing. And then how long have you been at pandadog? I've been there'll be three years this August. So well, a little long for the the SASS world. That is so true and that is a little long for CINASS, but three years, that's like three times three. You know, if you do there, it feels like probably much longer. A little curious. I know you mentioned like Tick Tock podcasting. For sure. Have you noticed kind of a transition in the content that you were focused on like the first, you know, one to two years, and what you're focusing it on over the last year? Yeah, absolutely. We started doing I was brought into be a writer and at the time our VP of marketing was like, hy man, writings are your superpower, no offense, let's get you in front of the camera and I was like cool, I do improv comedy on the weekends and I'm on stage all the time, so happy to get in front of the camera. And that was kind of where we made that transition about a year and a half, two years ago. Oh Wow, wow, so that's a couple of things. They're a you're a Badass for for taking it so well, it's and then, you know, moving into a video. But I think who was a man who said this would whoever he was, he was hundred percent right, because I think I begin about your camera presence before. Don't even know you. This is my first I've actually talking to you. Then I feel like I already know you. Well, we try, you know, I think I'm I'm trying to hit the sweet spot with my content. It's trying to be authentic, vulnerable, occasionally edgy, and trying to be creative and have a little little flare to...

...stop people mid Scroll on their phone. HMM. Well, when is it when you started actually doing and a some people are like tick tock, but A. I I'm absolutely obsessed with Tick Tock. It takes up an unhealthy amount of my first time. I love to hear it. So when I started seeing a lot of like creators on on Linkedin post their tick talks onto Linkedin, I was like right on, a, it's different, it right. It's fun to see some people are still kind of rolled their eyes a little bit, but we're actually starting to see some of the best creators, especially the companies on Linkedin, leverage it properly. So when did you guys actually get active on Tick Tock? was at a decision that you made independently, or was it something you're like hey, before we kind of throw in our eggs in this basket, let's just let's test it out and see if it actually works. Yeah, so panadoc isn't even still fully invested in Tick Tock. It's much more of an initiative that I've taken upon myself to do and create content for the people I've made connections with, the companies I'm connected to, and I was lurking on the platform at the very beginning of the pandemic. I was doom scrolling on every other social media and I wanted something different, so I deleted Reddit, instagram, twitter, got rid of it all. I still have accounts, but I don't have them on my phone, I don't check them, and I was like it. Just want something to escape to, and that's what I'm going to social media for, is to be entertained, either that's educated or challenged or you know, just laughing at something. And I just spent a good amount of time figuring out how the algorithm works on ticktock as a user and seeing how both my action and in action influences what I get Fed, and pretty soon realized that it's it is the most robust and the future of social media and remote most robust algorithm hands down. And then I was just like, I'm going to take a crack at it. I think I saw one or two people start at around the same time I did. Will Aiken from vid yard and sales feed him and I got started around the same time and we like to tease each other that. I went viral on my second video and got five hundred thousand views on a video I made and he was pissed off because he had been making them for months. So shadow will aikin and that was my that was my one hit wonder. I've never been able to recreate the magic, but from that I gained about eight hundred followers and I got fiftyzero engagements and likes from there and I just said Hey, maybe there's something here and cross crossing platforms, like you mentioned earlier, and bringing that fun over into Linkedin and showing all these, you know, serious professionals that we live in a crazy world. It's okay to be fun and have fun, and Pannadock was the right brand to do that. Not every brand is and not everything on Tick Tock is just fun. There's stuff on there too that's educational and you can can go that route certainly as well. Yeah, yeah, a hundred percent, and it's funny that you say that, Yo, Yo, one hit wonder. I remember I initially had downloaded tick tock back in two thousand and eighteen. Part of the reason I'm like I don't want to end up being one of those dinosaur marketers. There's no idea what the hell is going on. And as Cringey as tick tock felt back then for like millennials, when you're seeing like the generation before like at, you know, after us, I'm like him, you know, these kids boom, so weird. The more I ended up musing it, I'm like wow, they're so talented, they're so cool. My friends would kind of make fun of me and they'd say, Jazz, you're spending way too much time on tick tock. I remember the first time I thought it that in two thousand and nineteen that I wanted to start using it and I thought maybe I'll leverage tick tock, because I saw that a lot of educational content too. And I thought, and I was back then, I was a freelancer, so I said, maybe I'll start doing more freelance content and I had free lances that I was following that I was interested in. The first time I created a video on tick tock...

...because I had no idea how to use it. I decided I wanted to just test it out and I used a video of my dog who was wagging his tail. It's the cutest video ever. But I connected that to the song. Forgot the name of that Calabria. I'm not going to sing it, but you don't. Damn, damn, Damn, and exactly which twenty and the pace of his tail was very much in sync with the song. And I tested it, I loaded it and then I went to sleep and the next morning I wake up and I was like, are you kidding me? I ended up getting fiftyzero likes on that video. I had one. Thus fifteen hundred followers and tons of comments, and all I was thinking those Oh my God. First, for a second I was happy. I was like this is amazing. Look, so I got the booths that I needed, but been all of my marketing content would fall so flag because the people that fall would me just wanted me for my dog. Oh, I realize that. All right, I gotta just turn him into a dog influencer. But it was just too much because he's not like I love my dog, but he's twelve, he's twelve, thirteen years old. So he just wants to sleep all day. And so I gave up on on Tick Tock and I thought, Hey, if I'm gonna do it on my own, I probably have to create my own account. But kind of bear with you, but you gotlier than me. It's demurable. Yeah, cut, I'll send you the video after. Hey, please do. Yeah, I'd love to see it. Yeah, so, and the and the thing that I realized, and one of the things that you mentioned even in the cut that you shared, I feel like with Tick Tock, the more aus like, the less you'd think about it and the more natural it is. Right, they celebrate authenticity and it's one of the second questions I was going to ask you. What is the key to success in creating digital content, especially for you? You're creating video content, which is very, very similar, but the beast of its own compared to like the written content that a lot of marketers are creating. Yeah, I think everyone's definition of success when it comes to digital content it's gonna be a little different, you know, depending on what your goal is with the content is it? Is it to convert someone into a paying customer? Is it to entertain them? Is it to educate them? I try to blend a couple of different components into my my digital content and, like I mentioned earlier, you know, there's really five or six boxes that I try to check. If I can check more than two, I'm going to post it and I am my ICP. I'm going to steal that line from Aaron Morris See, a friend of mine, on Linkedin and Tick Tock, and I create content for me because I like it. I think it's funny and I know there are more people like me out there with similar roles, similar titles, who have similar struggles and have a lot of influence within their companies to make purchasing decisions and influence decisions. So the boxes I'm trying to check our is it edgy? Is it vulnerable? Is it authentic? Is it arresting and is it made with a creative flare? And usually try to, like I said, check at least two of those and I'll post it. The more it checks, the better it does, and sometimes they might lean more in one direction than the other, but those are all the different qualities of me that I'm proud of and I try to bring into the content I create and it seems to work so far. No, I love it. So kind of curious to because pennadox a big, big company and you guys up. Sure I have multiple teams. Are you interacting with some of the other marketing teams you have, whether it's people who are actually doing written content and we do you guys have like a shared strategy at all, or your kind of focused on building up your community and then you know, they kind of take over at one point? It's a great question. We have over sixty people in the marketing team at Pantadoc, just the biggest team I've ever been a part of, and we're broken into really two kind of apartments. We have performance marketing, which is really going to be focused on driving revenue through conversions. So that's where a lot of our folks who run events who run paid ads, paid search, who help manage,...

...you know, conversions on the website. All of those folks and all that testing happens over on that side of the House and we meet with them regularly to work on quarterly campaigns. And My side of the house is more of the brand side, so I work with the content marketing team. We have a couple of writers, we have a social media manager, we have and a lot of people that I'm forgetting to list all of them, but certainly one of the things that I like to do is take a look at our google analytics and see what content that's been written and has been living on our website and updated and driving a lot of organic traffic for the last few years, performing the best in terms of conversions. Right. So if people build out a forum on a specific blog post like pandadoc versus Docu sign right, I will create content that is in in the same vein as that and I will try to have it live in multiple places other than just the website. So yeah, I will embed that video at the top of that page, but I will also have it living on our youtube channel, driving ton of search traffic from there and then also going into social media and then enablement, which is kind of a cool, kind of part of our house as well, as I work really closely with our sales team and our enablement team and our training team to make sure that they have the resources that I'm creating these videos to be able to send and shoot off when they see fit in the SDR worlds, you kind of executive world, and yeah, it's a fun it's a fun role where I get to collaborate with a lot of folks, especially product marketing is a big one as well. Anything I create really goes through a lot of revisions and I hand picked the people I get along with best on these teams to make it a little bit easier. But certainly, like I did a seven minute video that I mentioned earlier, Pantodoc versus doc, you sign, and it's a comparison video of our products and what we do similarly what we do differently. This is a conversation, a question we get a lot both on the sales frontlines and through folks who are just, you know, what we call self service and trying to sign up for free trials on our website, and I figure why not create a really cool video to try to help answer that question as best as possible and I worked with sales and are one of our top selling account of executives, you know, preapprove the script just to make sure that it's all Gucci and his mind, as he would put it. I also had our product marketing managers, you know, come through it with a fine tooth to make sure that everything I'm saying is accurate. I had legal even look at it and verify that this isn't something that we're going to get a season assist letter on. So it is a collaborative effort when I do create content amongst the different teams outside of marketing and inside marketing. Yep, Yep, it's insane. I mean considering even you mentioned the sixty person team marketing team, beyond that here interacting with all these other department, sales and customer success, legal. So there's a lot that goes into it, along with meeting that cre of time right to come up with the ideas and using data to to inform how you're going to prioritize the content your specifically creating. So it seems like there's a lot of skill that you need to have, which you've probably and that that's where I kind of want to shipt gears a little bit and focus a little bit about you. What are the things that took you to the level that you're at, starting off with in your role right and where you're at today? What are the skills that you find are required for you to be successful? I think the skills that make me most successful are going to be, first of all, humility. Got To be humble and I think this is where some folks maybe fall off as they climb the ladder in marketing and they become more and more successful financially and he starts to see over teams and stuff. I think by learning to shut up and listen more and take a note out of the sales playbook. You know, the best salespeople, according to Gong, have a, you know, three thousand hundred and seventy talk to listen ratio,...

...and so I try to bring that to the table as well, and it's hard for me and my personality, with such a big mouth and being so theatrical sometimes. So that's the first one, is just humility. I think the second skill is grit. You know, Angela Duckworth is a formidable psychologist who wrote a great book on it. Go check it out and I think it's literally just called Grit and she runs one of my favorite podcast as well. No stupid questions. Go check out that one. And Grit is something where you're just you don't give up right your you have perseverance and I think think it's easy, in the SASS world especially, to be like well, I'm frustrated and I'm not making enough money, so I'm going to job hop and leave. It's like yeah, but is it? Is it so bad that you can't stick around and really prove yourself and learn from those around you? I think there's I've heard some really good conversations around like what boxes need to be checked before you just said you're going to leave somewhere or just give up on something, and a you know, the two biggest ones that always come to my mindor have I learned everything I can from the people here? And then have I achieved everything that I was hoping I could and add that to my portfolio? And then confidence is another one. So I think this is interesting that I wrote confidence in here with humility, because it's a fine line and we can dive into this little bit more and some of the other questions that you sent over. But confidence is really huge in especially doing digital content and being on camera and showing your face. Confidence and being on camera and knowing, like I don't always love the way I look or sound, especially when I first got started, so hypercritical. And then the other piece of that is having imposter syndrome and thinking who am I to be saying all these things? And I think if you've been in marketing for long enough, and long enough to me is a few years, you've worked in the trenches three, four or five six, that's when you can start to really gain some confidence in your experiences and and and bring that to your role. And the last one I will say is creativity is really important skill to have in the role that I have, and just improv comedy helped me to not take myself so seriously as an adult and helped me tap back into being goofy and breaking down the walls I built up in high school and in college and being an adult, of having a fear of others judging me as and not taking me serious and writing me off. And I actually found that my creativity and humility and grit and confidence and all those four have really helped me be a differential like those are all differentiators. They differentiate me from my peers and help me stand out, help me get promotions, help me get respect in the community. So now I love that. A couple of things that you mentioned that that really kind of stick out to me. Yeah, you did mention humility. The same sentence you mentioned confidence, and I even started thinking about confidence and humility in my context and I remember one of the quotes that I had read. I'm trying to remember what it was. Too much humility could lead to like feelings of an adequacy, which will get into a little bit, but too much confidence could lead to arrogance, right. So finding that balance where you want to be confident enough to test things out right, to build those relationships, to collaborate, and yet also you want to have enough humility, right, to still learn from other people, especially if you're in a leadership role, if you are leading a team. It's important to have a balance of both. One of the thing other things you mentioned, which I feel like I resonate with very, very well, is kind of just feeling of like goofiness, and I growing up I was also I have a big moth to but growing up I remember my dad and actually my whole family, would be like hey, you know, the people who are more quiet are taken more seriously, they're perceived as being more intelligent, so chut your mouth and I remember thinking pen, okay, let's let's do it. And there were times where, you know, whether it was in high school,...

I was actually very shy. But when I when I moved the country and I moved to a foreign blaze, Canada, doors not that for it, but I've been ear so I moved back home and I didn't know anybody. I kind of ended up having that confidence boost where I thought I can be myself, I could be whoever I want to be. I don't need anyone's approval, I don't need any validation. But it was until I had my first few jobs. So when I realized, man, everyone behaves like I have to behave like them. I can't be Goofy, I can't crack jokes, I need to be serious if I want to move up, especially as a woman. We were there's a radio when you're a woman in a man's world, and I'm mostly worked in tech. I was intil for a while. It was the same thing. I want to be taken seriously, but toning down my my my authentic self, which very much like you. I'm very animated and there were times where, you know, someone would hear me talk like your joke around away too much. You need to tone it down, not from work but other people who we hear me, family are and I thought no, I'm not going to tone it down anymore. So I love that we've got like your perspective and it kind of validates my feelings too, which we're at this point. You didn't good work, you have good relationships, who're respecting other people, you're respecting your team. You don't have to tone yourself down as long as it's appropriate, and you know I find you to be very, very appropriate. I'm sure you humor is very appropriate, and same with me. So I love that you mentioned all, all four of those, and it actually makes me so very happy. I just want to say God bless you, jazz, for being a woman in the crypto world, because I can't even imagine the bullshit you've seen and heard and had to put up with. So thank you for sharing that. I love it and it is a really important perspective to bring to the table and it's easy for me to say, Oh, but you're authentic self as a white, CIS gendered man. I think there's a lot of bias in that statement and I want to make sure I know tap into that that being you're authentic self doesn't always necessarily mean being the loudest person and the person with the funniest joke or the most outlandish linkedin post. It's sticking to your core values of who you are as a person and letting those be the guiding forces in whatever you're creating. I don't ever really have to worry about being an appropriate too much. I've and we can get into that, but you know, I know that I'm a good dude. I have a lot of really helpful people in my life who shaped me to have the right ethics and morals and values and that allows me to just take a breath and know that whatever comes out of my mouth ninety nine percent of times and be just fine. So yeah, no, I love it and thank you for acknowledging that to you. I cryptolic. That's place that I worked. I very much describe it like the Fire Festival documentary if you watch out on Netflix. So that could be I get have a full on conversation and but I'll save that for another another. It was a roller coaster. No regrets, though learned a little. So, kind of shifting a little bit on to you specifically how you got to wear it. What were those milestone moments that got you to where you are today? Yeah, so I would say a couple of milestone moments for me would include starting a marketing internship at age twenty five. I'm thirty one, turning thirty two. So I did a bit of a career switch and just kind of started from ground zero a couple of years out of university, out of college, and I was doing a marketing internship from eight am till three PM and then I would head home, throw on my pizza delivery visor and smock and wash dishes and deliver pizzas by night. And I did that for about six months and it was pretty rough, but it was what was necessary to kind of make my way and start from from scratch in marketing and I was at I was my first kind of big milestone and just again...

...going back to right, great humility some of those values. I would say the second biggest moustone would be getting poached by panda doc and that happened after failing to successfully acquire and purchase Panta dog from my previous team. They ended up going with a competitor, Quiller, and I was like that was not my vote, that was not my recommendation. So I was a little pissed off and then I decided to apply for a job at Panda Doc. Didn't get it and just said like, I don't care if I didn't get this first offer. Like I clicked with a couple of the people I interviewed with and I was just so impressed by the product and fell in love with it that I, you know, sent some personal messages to the recruiting team and just said, like, anything ever comes up, let me know. I would love to and then, you know, sure enough, a few months later I got a call from pantadock and they were like it's bring you on board man. I was like let's do it. So I would be second milestone, and then I'd think the the third one is really starting a podcast with a zero dollar budget and scaling it to where it is today, which is approximately a hundred thousand dollar budget. We have per year for production, and that includes renting out studio space and also hiring a wonderful team of digital animators and graphic designers. That is an outside agency that we work with that collaborates really well with our internal branding and design team to create the awesome visuals and helps me come up with segments and all sorts of cool stuff that just takes us to the the next level with our podcast. So I would say those are the three milestones I can think of. You know, I love them, and those are the kind of defining moments that I think are small enough where they make a huge impact and then big enough where they change your life and they change like panadox life. Because this I mentioned to you. The stuff that you guys are producing, you specifically, that I've seen, is the kind of stuff that I'm sure I, like, would fit into you guys as ICPs. You like I'm you. I am basically you. I'm also thirty one, turning thirty two soon next month. Hey, hey, yeah, yeah, so the stuff resonates with me too that you guys are producing. So I'm glad that they invested in you. I'm glad that you fell in love with them enough to move over, because company like panda doc is producing content that other marketers enjoy and we use it as a model for the stuff that we're also putting out. Hundred percent. So I think it's the wind win win for everyone. Thank you. It's so good to hear that. Yeah, next question. I'd love to know, especially the stuff that you shared, what is the most valuable lesson that you have specifically learned, and that might be a little bit hard for you to figure out, but one lesson that you think rises above all the other lessons that you've learned? The most valuable lesson hands down, is that I am more than the work that I do. I'm more than the content I create, a more than the quota that I chase, and I don't necessarily have like a hard quota like our strs do or AI's a's do, but we're certainly, you know, part of okurs on different demand generation goals that we put together every quarter, every month. I am complex and multifaceted. I'm a husband, a son, a dog dad, a friend and a hockey player and it's important that I try to strive for balance in the roles that are best that I can. I start to get down on myself in one area, whether it's I slept in too late and I get heart down on myself or being lazy right or I feel like I maybe I didn't do a whole lot of work on a specific day. I'm hypercritical of myself and that's when I step you know, kind of do my little what one of my favorite meditation teachers calls the pop out and pop out, and it's almost like little travis is speaking the Big Travis and you just says like hey, you doing okay, maybe let's find a different role for you to work on. That's not...

...work because you're not even focused, and you got to respect the process of creating content requires the right focus and the right setting and mood. So let's make sure that you're doing your chores, you're taking care of your pop, taking care of your wife, know, you've got your groceries, all those kinds of things, just checking all those boxes, and then we can come back and see how we can, you know, do the work. So we are all more than the work that we do. Know, I love that, absolutely love that. I'm everything you are except for asment of life and no Hokey player that's a hockey is the one thing, specially in Canada, was the only thing that I couldn't get into even seeing. You know, I wag my family would watch it and I think you can't even see the puck. Where's the pluck? But it's a it's a lot more fun to go to the Games in person. I will incourage everyone. If you haven't been to an NHL game, I have not. We know facks. Shame for a Canadian. I've never been to an Interston and they do excellent event marketing. I will say like marketing. Bring never shuts off. They crush it so nice, Nice. Well, I think if I go in person I can see the pluck that I'll probably be a little bit more attention. But hundred percent I agree with everything that you shared. Also, you know another thing you mentioned which I feel most people I've even the marketers I've spoken to, not even markers, people I speak to in general. We've been beating ourselves down a lot more, especially when you think after Righte covid there's really no separation between home and work, but this feeling in your home right to feel like you constantly have to be productive. I love the meditation hat that you shared. I'm going to try to use that for myself. Another thing that you know, that helped me feel a little little bit were at us for the days that I'm not I don't feel as productive. Is when you think about just nature and the cycles of nature right, like some of the hottest, hottest days are followed by the coolest knights in the deserts. In places like, you know, Indian, are places where there's lots of monsoons. Periods of drought are the than followed by periods of monsoon and there's balance in nature. There needs to be balanced in the daytoday work that we do. Periods of high growth and high productivity could be followed by naturally right, periods of just calmness and just chilling out a little bit. So we are not separate from nature. So it doesn't make sense for us to behave like machines and then beat ourselves down if we go out of service or whatever. Could I love it. That's a great analogy. The seasonality of, you know, our our planet is aligned with the seasonality of our day to day. It's a really good one. MMM, totally. So kind of shifting gears a little bit more on how you were able to create an opportunity for yourself. You've already mentioned things that I think most people who are listening to this podcast will realize that you've created a lot of opportunity. You were proactive, you reached out to the recruiters, you found a company that that you absolutely enjoyed and you made the opportunity for yourself. Is there anything besides just being proactive that you would recommend to with any of our listeners? Yeah, I think one of the biggest ways you can advance your career and create more opportunities for yourself is to cheer lead your own work. It's figuring out ways to share what you've worked on, whether that was something you created yourself or you've just been on a team that created it. You can, you know, do a better job of letting the people both internally at your company and externally in your social networks, see what you're working on. I posted on it for the first time on facebook yesterday, a video that I was really proud of and I had and posted on facebook. Like I said, in a couple years I had like professors from college, I had like friends from like middle school that were like Whoa, this is so cool, like I think somebody said I gave them Stephen Colbert vibes and I was like that, like makes me so happy. Thank you. And so, yeah, like no, tell people what you're proud of and get their you know,...

...look for feedback and reactions. Don't just wait for, you know, the quarterly or monthly recap with your team. Try to do it weekly. Even if you feel like you're being annoying or braggadocious, just do it. I promise you you're not. And again, I know this message will fall on deaf ears for people who are cocky and confident, and I'm hoping to resonate more with folks who have that imposter syndrome stuff. This will create so many more opportunities for yourself and it'll just make your bosses and the whole company more aware of what you're worth. So Tru Ledge work. I absolutely love that. And one of the things that you also mentioned with Cher leading what I started doing last year, especially when I end up getting a promotion, and I experienced all and we'll talk about that in the next question. I did experience very physical, you know physiological response due to imposter syndrome, and part of the work that I started doing just looking into myself and try to understand. Okay, this is insane. I've never experienced this. Our palpitations, sweating, feeling so depleted after meetings, and it was all something that I brought upon myself. One of the things that I learned when I was researching trying to find a care was to keep a bradsheet. It's kind of this kind of way you row right. Yeah, mentioned cheerleader work, cheerly your work and document it. Whenever you're feeling that you know that is creeping up, or you're feeling demotivated or you don't feel your best, take a look at that brandsheet or screenshot. You know people who said, Hey, high five jazz, you did X Yz. Right, if you using a two like fifteen five or slack, screenshot it, put on the Bradsheet and read it, review it to get yourself out of your head. So I love the fact that you know, cheerlead your work and also for anyone else is listening and has experienced this, keep a bragsheet of your cheerleading, right, and what all how other people are cheer leading you. Also, congrats on the promotion EF. Yeah, I think a little late. Yeah, thank you, thank you. You know, it's so funny. We'll move it to some selfdel question I actually had when I updated my linkedin profile. It was so bad that I unchecked. I didn't want anybody to get notified. Done that before. So we'll talk about how do you overcome self though, because, yeah, I've totally done it and I know a lot of people do it and you know, we're all kind of late to celebrate our successes. I for sure celebrate my success a little bit late her because I'm feeling a little bit better right now. But how did you call you up overcome self doubt? I know you've shared a little bit already. Yeah, I'll be fully transparent. One of the biggest ways I've overcome selftoubt is being therapy, traditional psychotherapy, talk therapy for six plus years, going from once a week every other week, maybe once a month, and just talking through, you know, all of the different things that are going on in my life daily. Zoloft. I'm on antidepressants that really help stabilize my moods of especially feeling extreme anxiety. As you were describing what was going on with you, jazz, I couldn't help but you know, flashback to some some of my own memories of just having complete meltdowns that were so out of character for me, especially as the pandemic was coming to its climax a couple of years ago. I just felt so overwhelmed that, as the first time, I decided to get on medication, and I was very anti medication and had to have multiple therapy sessions going back and forth with my therapist about why I didn't want to get on there. Well, didn't want to get on SSURRIS, didn't want to get on anything like that. I could do this myself. And I'll never forget this conversation we ended up having where he was like he was like let he's like, I'm going to give you a corny analogy and I know you're going to see right through this, but he's like you were glasses, right. I was like yeah, I work glasses. He's like what happened if you didn't wear glasses? Would you still be able to see? Almost like yes, I would be able to see, he's like, but not quite as good, right, and I was like cracked and he's...

...like so that's kind of like living life on like hard mode, right, and I'm like yeah, and he's like you could still get by it. figure. I squint while you're driving right, you could still kind of get through, but there's no stigma behind you wearing glasses. They're almost fashionable. It's cool. You go to Warby Parker and get your fancy hipster glasses. I was like okay, yeah, and he's like same thing. Of Medication, man. It's no shame in the medicine game, you know, is a sells pete, like to say a couple of years ago. But yeah, the occasional xanex Dai, zolofs therapy, all of that has helped me overcome self doubt and then opening up about my concerns to my wife, my boss, is my friends, being more transparent and then, like I mentioned earlier, doing Improv comedy help me overcome fear of looking silly, which I think is where imposter syndrome overlaps right like we have this anxiety of people judging us and making us feel stupid or inadequate, and when you do the Dumb Shit that I've done on stage in front of a couple hundred people, he just don't care anymore and that fear is just blasted right through. So No, I love that. I absolutely love everything you mentioned, and same with you like just starting with therapy. I think it is a right way to do it. I also had never thought about therapy. It's one of those things where it's like, how's it going to help me? But it wasn't until this year in January, when I ended up finding at the are bist and I was a religiously going all most of the point where I didn't really have time in my personal life because I was so hell bent on not creating this habit of fear and not not, you know, letting this take over me, because I was noticing the changes and I remember the first two sessions I thought, him, this is like such a waste of right time, I could just talk to anyone. The third session I was bawling my eyes out, not only, you know, related to work, but everything that I had just buried inside of me and I felt so light and from that point even might you know, I have a twin sister it and she's very anxious person too, and I remember to this day, I advocate going to therapy and you know, so my husband, Hey, you should do it. Hey, my parents, mom, vet, go up therapy. You guys need it. Everybody needs it, not to mention, you know, the stuff that we've all been through with Covid, our personal lives and friendships, relationships, trying to balance everything. I am all I'm also one of the people old very similar to you. I feel like you're might to win. I've also been very against, like antidepressants. So I'm still at that phase where I think that you know, I didn't. I don't want to get hooked on something like this. I don't want to destroy the gray matter in my brain or anything like that, or sort create more great matter, but I hundred percent to do even the therapists mentioned to me first, for some of the people were really feeling the anxiety and they've had it for years. A lot of times you need to be at a better play to then make that decision and start taking it. You don't have to be at rock bottom and it does help you. And I love the analogy of the glasses that you shared, because it is some people really they do needed. And if you're at that point where, yeah, I'm unresolved, like mental ill lists would lead to deeper issues, mental illness issues, and I know that because some of my friends have experienced disassociation and things from just not going there. Being all talking about their problems. So I love that you mention it. I love you share your story. Thank you for sharing it. Thank you so much for sharing your story. I really appreciate that and the transparency is is amazing and I just want to be like yeah, so I'm so proud of you have so proud of anyone that just makes that leap to go and do therapy. It's it can be so hard and I know a lot of people have bad experiences with therapists and they have their opinions and it's like for sure. The only thing I'll add on to that is, just like, there are a lot of specialists as well. So not every therapist is going to be the right fit, just like not every doctor. You know, if you're having an ear, nose and throat problem, maybe going to...

...your general practitioner isn't necessarily the best idea. Might be a good starting place, but to really get the help you need, you might need to find a specialization. For me, that's OCD. Finding an OCD specialist was really critical and to getting to back to sleeping better, eating better and just being more balanced and then just kicking ass. Bringing it back to like our conversation here just kicking ass at my job, having fun, not taking it too seriously. It's all a result of a what you just talked about. So No, no, it's a hundred percent agree. And we're actually reaching time. I don't want to take up too much of your time, Sennaha, busy you are, but I've got a couple of like very quick, fun questions and then then we can end it off. So, if you get a pick one super power, like a mute super power, what would you choose? That's a really good one. I think I would be to remember her name, where she can shape shift into anybody. Oh, yeah, forgot her dam mystique. Thank you. I would be I would have mystique's power. Yeah, Oh, I love it, love it, love it. I initially wanted I've asked this question with so many people. Now get this isn't you. You really learned a lot about them. I wanted to be who's a guy who does teleportation? I forgot his name. He's very cool from Xmen, the the car with the tail. Yes, shad man, our xmen. You can tell. This is the part I did not prepare for whatsoever. So it's about it to be like rapid fire. Come on. Oh my gosh, what is his name? I just I remembered it too, like literally two days ago. nightcrawler. nightcrawler. Yes, oh my gosh, okay, this is definitely not a fire check. That okay, maybe, thanks. I just need to be a lot quicker. If I had to ask you to deal a little stand up comedy act for our audience, would you do it? Oh yeah, absolutely, a hundred percent. All right, so you, Lena, you know who when to reach out to. Travis. Yeah, I'll get a type five. Let's go. I'm ready to rock the cool it would be an actor that would play your movie video. Oh Man, I've been told I look a lot like Edward Norton. Oh, I love it, and that is very true. They're like everyone's like, Oh my God, Edward Norton would play me. Love it, love it, love it. And what's one thing you can't live without? My friend, She Gordom O. Gordo, very cute. Does he have an instagram? He does not have, you should have heard in any of your videos. Has He been monetized? No, no, he wich. Get on it, I know. Definitely think you should get on it. Finally, who is who are your role miles who inspires you? My role models include my boss, Andre Fahey, Seth Goden, who is the host of the a Kimbo podcast and he's also a very famous marketer, Stephen Dubner, he is a journalist and writer for freakonomics and also a podcaster. John and Julie Gottman are marital therapists and my dad love it, absolutely love it and love that you gold in your therapist. And Yeah, I freakonomics. There was a chapter freaking o makes that talked about having a table scoot of oil. I tested that. It is a first freakonomics, having a tablespoon of oil to curb appetite. Gilly, is it work? I don't remember that one. I did it it. It did work and it's supposed to because it's also like one or two hundred calories per tablespoon. It's supposed to keep you satiated. I probably did it for like three four days and waste while break glories back. We need to eat. I continued to eat by regular meals, but I added it, you know, one to two tablespoons before every meal and then I would continue eat that Burger...

...after. So I don't recommend, but my favorite freekonomics. Little fact toids is one of the reasons chick fil a is so successful is that it can't necessarily be recreated by just anybody. So they spent I think it was like over six million dollars inventing their own basically like oven that they could cook homestyle chicken in at scale, and then they installed those in all of their stores. So Little Fun factoids like that. Or what Steven done theer? Yeah, now I love that. I will actually pick up the lays book and I'll read that. Finally, what's your advice on those getting started? And then how can you know people? People contact you and reach out to you? I think one of the my advices is follow me on Linkedin. I know it sounds like a plug, but message me, set up some time to chat. I'll give you resources, I'll give you people to follow. I'll try to answer the questions that you have the best that I can. But I found that that has been most helpful from what folks have have told me. And I do it at a couple, I think a month of folks were just getting started and just having a quick thirty minute soon call and giving you some resources and places to go go check out and get inspired hundred percent, and you guys can follow Travis because will link his stuff and we'll make it easy for you to find him. But thank you so much, Travis, for this conversation. I gotta say I love your vibe. I love like the Gooky side of you, the con side of you. This, the answers that you shared and kind of the conversation that we had today resonates so much with me and I'm sure resonates with a lot of people on audience. But thank you so much for joining us and blessing growth marketing camp with your presence. Yes, big fan of growth marketing camp, big fan of you, jazz. This is awesome. Thanks so much for having me and when I'm up in Canada, maybe we'll have to meet up for for a hockey game. Under present will do hockey and Ben we'll do poutine. I'm in Vaca. There you go go, canucks. All right, present, thanks for listening to growth marketing camp. If you enjoyed this episode, would love it if you would give it a quick five star rating or share it with a friend or colleague looking to give a little more inspiration for their next campaign. You want to learn more about the company behind the show. had to open sensecom. That's open se and Secom will catch you on the next episode.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (74)