Growth Marketing Camp
Growth Marketing Camp

Episode 43 · 7 months ago

How One BBQ With Friends Changed Jimmy Daly’s Career Path

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Jimmy Daly has a very definite point of view when it comes to the content marketing profession. Majoring in English, he knew he wanted to be a teacher, but fortunately for the B2B SaaS world, that plan didn’t pan out. It took one barbecue with friends and the magnificent Animalz to lead him to own (and crush it) with his content marketing community & agency, Superpath. 

Jimmy joins us on Growth Marketing Camp to share why he believes humble beginnings, patience, and focus are a winning combination. He shares the impact of the Slack community that helped build his business and the power of a holistic and diversified marketing strategy.

Welcome to growth marketing camp, or we sit down with our favorite marketers to do mystify growth and give you the insights to help turn your next campaign into a major success. Let's get into it. Hello, Ladies and gentlemen, this is bobby and Rayue, host of growth marketing camp. I am really excited today to be joined by Jimmy Daily, the CO founder and CEO of Super Path. Jimmy, welcome to the show. Thanks, Bobby. Looking forward to chatting. Yeah, me too. Before we get started, tell me a little bit about super bath. Yeah, sure. So Super Path is a community for content marketers. We have, last I checked, almost six thousand people in our freest slack group talking about everything. Everything, I mean in general. We actually try to steer conversations towards more advanced topics like that's kind of part of our stick. So you're not going to find, you know, how do I do keyword research or how long should my blog post be? It's much more about, you know, how do I properly attribute the value of content in our reporting? And if my budget is is x and my boss says I should do why I like, how do I handle this? You know, like very like kind of real world, multi factorial problems like that people are actually dealing with on a daily basis. So that's kind of the core of it. We also have a job board we can come we were shoot more recently. We have a marketplace where we're matching up writers with companies who need content. So a couple different things going on, but like the gist of it is, if you work in content marketing and you want to network with peers and potentially find work, whether that's gigs or jobs, it's a good place to hang it. That's really interesting and one of the first questions I think about when you describe that. Since you have sort of exposure to literally thousands of content marketers out there, I imagine there's probably different backgrounds, different experiences, different companies for which they're potentially creating content for. Are there any sort of unifying or common denominator trends and problems or issues or ideas that you sort of are able to glean? Just I don't know if you spend a ton of time in the weeds, but I'm just wondering if there's anything kind of jumps out to you that you are observed over the last year two for sure for sure. I actually just I sent out a series of tweets the other day about kind of like trends I've observed recently. So there's sort of like a set of those and then there's like some like evergreen trends that I feel like okay, never go away like an evergreen. Trying to content marketing is like making your strong business case for it or like managing up. Yeah like that. That's a does a topic that comes up in our frequently enough that I'm like this just must be like a universal problem. A part of it's like career development thing. It's like learning how to man a job in part. So it is like the I think still, as as why it's bread and come a place as kind of marketing is become, they're still like some inherent skepticism about it from management, who would probably prefer to be able to measure like dollars in dollars out, and it's just like never quite that simple, you know. Yeah, yeah, sort of like a specific challenge for content. Or get other trend and it's kind of totally unrelated. But another trend that I've noticed recently is that content creation is to change so much in in terms of where it comes from and who does it and, you know, like the inhouse content role, like content managers, like the that's the primary role. Like that Les Change Quite a bit. It's a lot less about content creation now that it once was, and at the moment there's many vendors, made good vendors out there for folks to get content created, whether it's agencies or freelancers or whatever. Huh. I'm just not sure what to make of that necessarily, but I find it interesting that, like the content ops is happening in house right energy reporting, you know, kind of collaborating with other teams or whatever, and then like the the work product is being outsourced primarily, and I'm not sure that's a great trend over the long term, but like, yeah, definitely where we are right now. Yeah, that's really interesting. You know, off camera, we were just I was just mentioning to you I've had some conversations recently with some folks who had their companies and made massive investments in inhouse content...

...creation, whether it was, you know, basically hiring like almost a full time social media presence, like ticktock content creation, or, you know, on the other hand, like building a full inhouse studio to sort of produce high quality webcast, because I mean that makes sense, right a hiring someone whose job it is to create content for your company. But the alternative of hiring like sort of a third party agency? What does it actually look like? And if that's too broad of a question, just tell me. But but I'm just kind of curious, like if we have a strategy that we want to execute, what ends up happening from there? Hmm, I could talk about this all day. So I have an agency background. So like, okay, you know a lot of a lot of the work I've done over the past like five years or whatever. Yeah, is in that how cut you in? So, like this is like a type of situation we would you know, we would engage with companies in this in this way. Cool frequently. So there's a few ways it plays out and it kind of depends, like where you're starting point. It's like, okay, I've an early stage company with a vision for content marketing, or are you like, you know, Series d company, you know where you bring on vendors to be like called in the wheel? You know, you're already understand exactly what the strategy got it and you just need more of it. Got It. See you that, I would say, the engagement begins there and that would that would have a pretty heavy influence on the type of vendor you might seek out to do the work for you. Sure, I think agencies actually can be great for strategy, right. So, like a lot of the companies that we worked with at animals, which is an agency I worked out previously, they had a vision for content but not a strategy, and so like we would help them turn that vision into into a document I see executed against. You know, that was really helpful because it was sort of take their, you know, their hopes and dreams and make it after this like very realistic plan with a budget attached to it, deliverable's timelines, all that good stuff. And like a good agency is going to make your life a lot easier in that regard, because, you know, there was another kind of persona now, that we would sometimes work with, where they had tried to execute off the vision and sort of skipped the strategy piece, and that's very messy expensive as yeah, you know, so good to just kind of access like a check and balance system for you to make sure here what you hope to accomplishes, for realistic, very, very interesting and again, you know, the common theme that I think our listeners wonderstand that I'm fairly selfish what some of my interviews, because I like I like to take a lot of what I was hearing and sort of associate with myself. I don't know if that makes meself there's self center, whatever the case is, but I'm just thinking about what it might look like for our company to engage with an agency at some of the value that could potentially provide, and that's a definitely conversation for another day. But you know, you touched on animals, which is part of your career background. I do want to get into your background a little bit because I think that in some of the research that I'd done just on your background prior to conversation, it's pretty clear to me that you have a pretty I don't want to say unique, but a definite point of view on the content marketing profession and sort of what it can mean to someone and their pursuits in their career. But tell me a little bit about your career and maybe sort of like how you ended up here, because you were an English lit if I'm not second major in school, imagine you're doing a ton of writing, but tell me a little bit about sort of how you parlayed your educational background and and got into content marketing and sort of, I guess, what your thoughts are on it as a profession and what it can mean to people's careers. Yeah, I love that question because actually my experience with my own career development, yeah, led directly to the creation of super path and, in God as a lot of the stuff we talked about there. So, I mean my own start was I actually I was an English major and I at one point tried to switch to English education, thinking I'd become an English teacher, but my h low, I couldn't get in last I was yeah, I guess I'll stick with this. I don't know. Yeah, but I mean I was a slacker, like I sure question about like I was a slacker. And so I graduated no clue what I'm going to do and I actually went and work to the school and I was a sub...

...thinking like maybe I go down this track, but I found out pretty quickly that was not what I wanted to do. You know, I guess life presents you with opportunities from time to time, and I'm absolutely every cute hanging out with some friends and family friends. Had started this Web Design Agency and needed some folks to do like Seo writing, and he was like, Oh, you know, you English major, right, you do some writing, and I was like you'll pay me to do that? Like yeah, definitely, I'll do that. And so when I started doing some freelance work for him and they would build websites for lawyers. So it's like you know how to find a Dui turn it right now, like stuff like that. And it did not pay well and I think we sure be like thirty bucks an article maybe, but it did get the wheels turning oft like okay, this as I kind of discovered this world of Seo and couldn't and I was like I think there's a place for someone like me here, like if I can write and I can made me like kind of learned some of this business stuff along the way, like maybe I could do this. So, you know, one thing led to another, like actually went and work for that company full time for a few years. I went to another agency. I found out about BB SASS and I was super intrigued by that and I worked for two babysas companies and inhouse roles. You know, later on found animals, which for me was like the greatest place in the world. It was the first time that I had been at a place where the content marketer was it like, you know, and it's, as companies, all about the engineers, you know, like and agency is kind of it's about the account managers and the account exacts. But like at animals specifically, it was like content, only wow, like we build a whole culture just around content, and it was a ton of fun. Like I had so much fun and it like in many ways for me, was like a kind of springboard for my own career. Cool, because small company us to the opportunity to pick on leadership roles like early. Learned so much I ended up running our sales for two years, because you gotta like just wear a lot of hats that this small company, and I learned an enormous amount of doing that. So, you know, one thing I learned just throughout that hall I just described like twelve years of my litterview. Maybe. Yeah, one think I learned was like patients is very important. You know, humble beginnings are fine as long as you part them up with patients, and I certainly found that to be the case with super path like getting this business going. I mean the beginning was like, as anyone care is this is a yes or any remote possibility that this could actually be a business. Yeah, like even just support me, like just me all time, you know, and you know we're only two years in, but I'm already seeing kind of the fruits of the patients and the focus and some of the things that, like, I sort of learned kind of by accident earlier on in my career that are kind of like yeah, hang out again. Yeah, you know, that's really, really cool. Imagine another lesson as makes you attend as many barbecues as possible. But no, I just there, nothing else. You'll have fun, yeah, you will. Yeah, if you want to cattach on the careered thing a little bit, yeah, please, please, let's talk about that. We talked about this a lot, quite a bit actually, an archmus so the when I started this sad community which at the time was called the Content Marketing Career Growth Slack Group, which, so I shortened, means an acronymunt yeah, it's became super bad eventually, but I'm actually I started to be specifically for career focused conversations about content marketing because, Guy I found myself in this role were like at the time my title was VP of growth for animals. Mostly what I was doing with sales, and I was like, I'm a content market doing sales, like I didn't expect to be here, but like actually, the work that I've been doing for the past, you know, ten years actually prepared me quite well for this role and I didn't anticipate that. And I wanted to talk to other folks who kind of grew out of content marketing, and that sounds a little weird, but like I definitely recall being, like, you know, mid to late twenties, working in content marketing and noticing that like everyone else was in their mid to late s also. Yeah, like I was like what about people are like forty, like what would have they doing? Why? Why are none of them content marketers? And one of the things I learned was that content creation is a...

...beautiful way to for non technical folks to work in the tech world and which, as you build those skills, they're actually it. There is a track for high level content marketing, like many companies have now have heads of content, even VP's of contents, like that is a track. You can take. Yep, plenty of folks go out and build their own freelance businesses. Some folks, like me, end up in sales and now starting a business kind of focus around content marketing. Yeah, other folks kind of go more broadly into marketing. Maybe they you know, by the time there ten plus years in the career, there are Director of marketing where a VP of marketing curtaint and is kind of part of their per view. But no, all of it. And I just kind of wanted to like start having conversations like this with other people to try to understand. Like you know, at the moment there's like a generation of content creators that don't know what's next for them. Yeah, and content creation probably isn't it. Maybe it is for for a handful of them that they de can be like the very, very like high level individual contributor type and if it's like an amazing path, if that's your passion. But there's like this whole other world of stuff you can do with strong content, the marketing skills, because it teaches had a right, teaches had to think and analyze. Yep, it's usually had to edit and iterrate on your idea. So there's like it's some of these kind of I guess I kind of loosely called a soft skills of like if you can do these, you can apply them and last a different way, isn't yeah, you know, what I think is really interesting about that is the whole idea of content marketing and the value that it creates foreign organizations. Marketing Strategies relatively new. I think it coincides with inbound strategies. You've talked about Seo, you know, and just your ability to have like a not just a presence online, but a meaningful presence, an authoritative presence, and so it's almost like because of that the career paths are still sort of being developed. Like that first generation of content marketers are now like in those vp or c level type roles and and maybe my timelines are a little off here, but it's very analogous to, I think, the sales profession. We're talking about this before as well. You know, my my first role in sales was I was a glorified telemarketer, you know, making the hundred and twenty cold calls every single day or whatever it was, hopefully getting three credit cards over the phone. But you do that because you understand that there's there's a path, right and as a sales person, you can pick, you know, if I want to be in high tech or bb Sass, just be darn good at my last role and apply for the next one. And it sounds to me that a similar opportunity is potentially present for those who excel in content marketing because, like you said, those skills that you're developing are very transferable, like whether it's, you know, be the beast Sass Industry, whether it's mechanical engineer, I mean, I mean, I'm just thinking, like what are their industries? Like everyone is trying to assert that presence online, like that's where your buyers are, that's where you have a chance to really sort your brand, and so it seems like perhaps that's kind of what we are observing in your profession. Yeah, yeah, I definitely, definitely, and you know, one thing I've just sort of noticed recently and said I think like content marketing has become actually it's somewhat lucrative for the people who mark in it. Okay, I think that's wonderful, but I think in some ways sets kind of the wrong impression. I mean, okay, as someone who, like advocates for content marketers all day long, like I want people to get paid well, and sure, I jo you haven't. I feel like it's actually not for most people. It is not specializing and content marketing is like not really the thing. Yeah, you know, it's like there's skills that will make you better content marketer, but really, like you're nicheing down. Should happen somewhere else, you know, like an exam would be like I talked to a lot of companies to sell to developers and the other never can find content marts and I find myself being like hey, kind of people go down this road, like if you can help these companies communicate their technical...

...products, like you were going to have a world of opportunity. Yeah, and it's not really about being a content marker. It's just about like taking taking the skills you develop about communication and editing and editorial planning and all the whatever other things, you know, take that and apply in this like very specific the way, like that's the opportunity is absolutely is not like centralized in this content world, you know, totally, totally, like yeah, the domain, the domain knowledge and your ability to articulate. Like what's important about that? Domain like is probably where there's, like, like you're saying, a pretty a pretty incredible opportunity. Can we talk about content marketing in general? And I don't want to belieabor the point or get blogged down in it, but I would I do want to kind of understand from your perspective what your view is on the value of content to a and I'm partifically interested in like the Bab space, you know, in my again Lizard Brain, I understand it, as you know again Seo, making sure that you have that authoritative presence where you can look like a source of truth and in knowledge on a particular subject or or wherever, whatever business you're operating within, and ultimately that drives in bound interest. I mean, is that still the case? Or maybe you can just talk to me a little bit about sort of like how the function has, if at all, evolve over the last, you know, ten to twelve years that you've been you've been involved with it. Yeah, that's interesting. I think it's in many ways it is the same, you know, like like in my time and animals, so I'm like doing sales, like, Yep, I think I wrote a blog post to one point. It's like stuff I learned doing two hundred sales calls or something something like yeah, yeah, kind of like trying like pattern match. Yeah, yeah, type to conversations I was having. It's like you hear some of the same things over and over again. It's like yeah, performance marketing sure is expensive. I guess we should do content or leging. You know, we just raised the series a. You know, we can finally do content it. You know, like you for kind to find a couple these patterns, and I think for for a lot of companies, content marketing is still like a box they're ticking. You know, it's like someone's running marketing. They say, okay, we've got to do like Ma some demandagin reduced up and bound and we use content. What kind of that's our engine. There Hoil do a little bit of performance marketing or whatever, and so I guess I think the thing that hasn't changed is the thing that people want is they just want free, free traffic. Like that's never changed. I think that's fine. You know what I mean that it's great. Like are you still heavily reliant on these platforms that you have no control over? Yes, is that really frustrating? Definitely, but like it still works. HMM. No, I think that the function has expanded quite a bit, though. So, like where we used to see kind of like a single stream content strategists, like here's a blog, like literally, it's a single stream, it's reverse chronological blog. Yeah, yeah, yeah, literally, Yep. Yeah, like that has expanded and that's been great because that means that, you know, it's sort of marketers are thinking a little bit more holistically about who these people are and like how, how they might provide some value to them. Yep, you know. So I think that's great. I know was one of the things that we preach quite a bit at animals was, like get a diversify the strategy. Sure, you call them lanes still, like you build an Seo lane, and that's fine and it serves a particular purpose, but if that's all you do, it's probably not going to be enough to achieve like business subjectives. Like it can achieve the the traffic objective, but it probably can't do all of it for you. So, you know, other examples of lanes might be like thought leadership, you know, sales enablement, template libraries, but you know, there's kind of all these other things and you see this like now it's sort of become a new playbook where everyone runs like the same four lines. Yeah, yeah, which is also like it's okay, it works. Like you don't have to be like, you know, like groundbreaking to come up with a strategy that will work. Sure when you apply like good execution and patients. And then like certainly, we see like a couple. I guess this will always be the case. There's like a couple outliers, people who are just doing stuff. It's...

...like really cool, okay, that's you know, that's interesting. And then that that like overtime, gets folded in to the step everybody else does. Yeah, part of this. Yeah, and of like every now and then somebody's like goes out and does something great and everyone sort of copies. It doesn't work anymore, you know. Yeah, and your Chen cause that that phenomenon, the law of Shitty Click throughs, and he was describing it in the context of performance advertising, but kind of applies all over. It's like, yeah, if you just copy what other people do, it doesn't work as well. Yeah, like any strategy that once felt novel will not work for Yeah, yeah, you know, it's just like have this. It's a pit peeve of by like the side idea of play books. I think, you know, it's cool and I think you can great value in the market by generating play books, but my whole idea around that at is that if there was like a specified way to do it and to be successful doing it, then everybody would be doing and everyone would be successful and and obviously that's not always going to be the case. Yeah, it also reminds me of the predictable revenue stuff. Again, not to make everything about like again analogous to sales, but this I still remember. You know, think about how many emails you must have received, even in your position as a vpv at animals were are you the right person in the subject line? You know, that was the thing that like outbound SDRs and so yeah, doing four years to set meetings and again like kind of diminishing returns over time. One quick thought on that is, like her, I think that execution and content is still really hard, okay, and that is so often the barrier. So, like, even though the strategies, like if you were to go and observe like several hundred bb task companies and Hannah, notice that many of them do like kind of the same thing. Yes, it's kind of look the same. Yeah, it's still hard to execute. Like it's hard to hire good content people. You know, you can find good vendors, but like you have to find them. You know, you have to manage they, need to keep them on track. Like you got to have somebody thinking about quality. You gotta cross all your teas and dollar your eyes and so like, I think that there is still room to succeed with like a kind of boilerplate strategy shore if you're going to like really nail it absolutely. So the execution part is it's it's probably the most important and I like you talk about quality and I think about that a lot sometimes and in reading some posts on social media that you can kind of see when it's just like every day run of the mill stuff and you can kind of see when it's like, oh, okay, they really nailed the idea. Even the quality of this like Sai Linkedin Post like because actually like quite valuable. So right as always. I think you know, that's an important takeaway, is that strategy is only as good as it's execution, and I think that's probably Cliche, but it's good to reaffirm that. I think at the context of this conversation. I want to ask you, you know, you mentioned lanes and and some of the things that you've seen the accomplished. I think there's there's an interesting parallel here with the community that you've built, and I'm not suggesting that the community is sort of necessarily, you know, tied directly to content and lanes, but I do want to ask you about some of the things that you are seeing that are those outliers right now in terms of content. Like what are some things that you're seeing that are just innovative and and effective potentially awesome, and I don't know if there's a tie into community, because I do want to get to that at some point in our conversation as well, but maybe we can just start by, you know, talking about like some of the things that you're seeing. Yeah, one or two things that are just blowing out of the water and it's and for sure some way. Yeah, for sure you will quick them. On the community thing would be one thing I learned animals was that in doing sales calls, you really understand the problems that these people have. Yep, and no amount of keyword research will ever reveal those same absolutely it feel like there's just no substitute for being on the phone talking to people. Community plays nicely into that because the conversations that happened in our community yea SI stuff I never thought of. Really, no amount of research I could ever do that would lead me down these paths. You you just but if you get people talking, and so the community becomes the...

...platform for the kind of the peer to peer discussion. Hmm, it's a me as a moderate or can sit back and observe this stuff, can be like wow, this is insane and then like I'm, of course, trying to figure out how do we sort of like capture this, you know? Yeah, yeah, we take this really novel insight and package it up so other people can learn from it? Or like should we host an event, you know, focused on this theme, or you know, whatever, like the community wearing it gets going about, like how can we help other people learn and benefit from, yeah, this stuff, which is yeah, yeah, gold, yeah, let's go. So there's something there. You know. I don't know. To takeaway is like you're in kind of marketing and you're not like talking to people. Do Yeah, like I've been doing it wrong. Well, you're the third you're the third person I've spoken with just in this calendar. You're alone who is mentioned the importance of leveraging the engagement and the conversation to understand like how to create value in some way, and I think that that is like probably the theme of my years so far in terms of like understanding how, like even our company can be better at marketing, can be better at even this podcast is just finding ways to engage, like whether it's in the comments section or you know, I know it's a little bit different within a slack community, but you know that it's not just a one way stream of consciousness, like, Hey, here's our podcast, you know, this awesome conversation with Jimmy, but, you know, actually engaging with any of the insights or comments or or feedback that's given in any of the platforms that it's presented as. It as a means of you know, potentially you're going to what we should be doing next, right, and so so I think that's like it's a lesson that I think our listeners are going to hopefully not get sick of, because I'm just recognizing that as a pretty consistent theme. But, you know, let's shift gears hero into and talk a little bit about the community, because you're talking about it a six thousand member community. You're talking about something that you started with, you know, kind of a little bit of just hoping it turns into something right, that the patients as a virtue that you mentioned earlier. But let's let's talk about it. So where did this all come from? And and why slack, and what have you learned in the last couple of years that you think our audience could benefit from? Oh my gosh, so many things. Not to be too over the place, but two quick examples of people. Yes, see, like great content. Yes, yes, and then I can't inser the question you just yes, one would be it just came across. It's coming to called my q. They make like smart garage hardware and software cool. They're doing a youtube series. Basically they're like finding people with the coolest garages. We're old, and then they go there and they do these like tours of the garage and it's awesome. Threes. So good content is so good. So I'd found that to be like, I don't know, these people got to my radar. Yep, you know, I wasn't thinking about a smart garage door opener but like on my radar now. Yeah, another would be kind of in a more traditional sense. There's company called it's called Charlie, Charlie hrcomis. Okay, they're nailing this very nice blend of thought, leadership and FCEL. They have a lot of opinions and perspectives on human resources, which is like the space they operate in, and they're really doing a good job like empowering people's voices, you know, and like letting them say what they really think. You know, not that that in it up itself is like a brand new strategy, but it's just like to see it is is very refreshing. Another one that I would say you're in like if, if text is just that, you're not going to go make Youtube series or whatever, you know, spice it up a little bit, like that's a yeah thing be yeah, thinking about. I'm prety sure in those examples, if I'm a if I'm a company that perhaps would want to do something like that, it's the best route to either they're engaging agency, or would it be to build out the strategy and then hire to execute in house? I think if you it depends what your existing team looks like. Okay, okay, if you have an existing team, even like a single person,...

I would pilot it in house. For sure. Yeah, like do it. Set the example. You know what I mean. You're like scept the bar, like in this you hand it over to someone else and say, like, I have already created this, this is the purpose of it, this is what I wanted to look like. Run with it. Yeah, you know what I mean. But if you if you haven't done that, agencies do their agency thing where they're like let's brainstorm and yeah, just, yeah, it's like an expensive way to you know, like yeah, so, yeah, I would say definitely, like inhouse pilots are great, and it like, as someone who worked in an agency, when a couple whenies came to us and said, like and tried it and it worked and we want you to help us like expand it, we're like great, like awesome, we can nail that. Okay, good to know. I'm glad that you brought those up because, as I think, you're two really awesome just things to think about. But let's shift gears your as we had, to the home stretch and talk about super bath, because I do want to know you know, and you know touched on it to some extent so far. But you know, you go out there to start this community, you know what's going through your mind because you know, any time you're starting something for like from nothing, that's that's a big, big leap. But you know, let's talk a little bit about that. Why Slack? And I guess what are some of the key learnings that I you've perhaps encountered down for the last a couple of years for sure. So I started it actually on a whim. They were no intention of ever making this business. I'm working at animals. I sort of notice this trend of like people have flat groups, like Huh, I always found slack to be, honestly, like pretty annoying. It's just like this thing distracting me from like doing my job, you know. But then, yeah, I thought of it in the context of like, oh, there's like lots of like smart people I know in this industry, like it actually would be cool to use it to talk to them. So I spent of a slacker group is content marketing, career growth, where as I'm long name and you know, right off the bat a couple people joined and we started having these conversations and it was really good. It was like very like strong signal. You know, I like this at this cool, I like this, you know. And like in some way they feel like that small thing on its down like set the tone for everything that's happened since, because there was again sort of like that early behavior modeling thing that happened, or was like as more people joined, they saw high signal, you know, really like kind of Medi real problems being discussed, and it's, yeah, set the tone for like the RT for the conversations that they would start or participate in. And sure that was not intentional, but that's what happened. And like, I I'm so wedd because if it had started as like kind of like, you know, intro to content, them, marketing, hey or whatever, you know, and I said, a totally different tone that I don't know that we could have really gotten away from if we wanted to. Yep, so interested about yeahs. Like six months into running this community, which mean when I say running, I mean like hanging out there sometimes, like I wasn't really doing anything. I wonder, like we weren't doing a MA's or events, like we got to all that later. My boss at animals, Walter Chen, came to our leadership team and said, look, I've been running company for a couple years, I'm ready to step down to see you and we're going to shake things up a little bit. So, you know, there's a sort of number of things that happened from that. But one of the women that was on our team, she became the CEO of animals and as part of this, Walter K to me it was like, you know, I think, I think your slide community could be a business. Like, HM, why don't we talk about that? And I was okay, yeah, I mean I could, you know, I'm seeing other communities to do this kind of yeah, and a niche, Niche Group of people and you know, maybe got a job bored, you know, like I could kind of like start to piece together like what that might look like in my behind. And and then covid happened and all that everything got so okay. Yeah, and it was we kind of like had made this commitment that like, I was going to do this. I'm working a full time and he was going to help me fund it. Do you get it going? So we made the commitment to just do it. anyways, turned out the COVID actually was providing some headwinds for us, or tails tail? Okay, okay, yeah, you know, like it. Community is like, you know, at least real world community, and you know, middle of two thousand and twenty was we had lost that absolutely, you know, in this online thing is like it's not as...

...good, but like it's something. And Yeah, I think there was a lot of uncertainty about people's jobs and careers and they stable organ it's too there. It just like it actually gave us this huge surge of activity. So, you know, we were one of the fortunate companies to benefit from that. You know what I mean? As this is all coming together, I'm realizing I suck it community moderation and like we've got a kind of like edge structure to this. Otherwise it's just like chaos all day along, every day. Yeah, yeah, yeah, and then so then we started, like we really thought through like what are what channels? What topics were we gonna talk about? You know, let's bringing some people and do some AMAS. Let's do so we actually start doing user gener ready content very early on, or we would like either run surveys or I have people turn their slack comments in the blog post. We started the sink called the hundred kke club where like if you worked in content, you made more than six figures. Like you, we do these like anonymous interviews with you and you could like tell us about your journey. It's and you can say like that's so, exactly how much money you make. Yeah, yeah, so cool, and let's so there's sick a bunch of things we did. It kind of like helped us keep this momentum. Thought many times about leaving slack because I didn't give it any thought. It's free, so, yeah, signed up for it, but actually I feel that for all the many, many, many problems that slack presents for community admins, it's the best tool out there because nobody's already using it. Yeah, you know, it's like I've played around with some other tools which have cool functionality whatever, but like we're not moving. Yeah, kind of along as is all happening. Like I'm figuring out, like we have to make money. Yeah, I was like what's our model? I felt pretty strongly from beginning that this is going to be a b Tob Revenue Strategy. We're not going to charge members, because not that I had been like I had not worked in that world before, but I just is like a ten bucks a month or whenever. We're never going to turn this into a real business. Like I would so much rather use the community, like let the community girl, like, let people come and participate and get value whatever, and then we're going to sell the businesses. Yeah, yeah, like job word was like a natural one. We did launch a membership which is designed to be paid for by companies, not the individuals, kind of like I pitch it as like cheaper than a conference and way better too. You know, yeah, you just had totally aren't you? Good Info. And yet networking opportunities to stuff through that sponsors was like another kind of obvious one. I was like, we have this high density group of content marketers, so like let's get that rolling. That all happen in the first year and it works. I mean what, we're going gang buses or anything, but like the company was growing and we were making enough, least enough of revenue for me like pay myself a decent salary. Yeah, feel like we can do this. Yeah, you know, I'm ultimately got to this point where I started feeling like, okay, when I look at our growth, I see it's linear, and that's fine. My goal was never to turn this into some, you know, giant company, like it's not a venture fund's ass company. It's sure be a lifestyle business because, yeah, flacker, and I don't want like her. I don't want that pressure. Yeah, you know, yeah, yeah, yeah, very much about the lifestyle and the market place started feeling like a very natural move for us for a few reasons. Like, for one, job market is just so crazy right now, but when we get freelance jobs on our job board, tons of people apply. Yeah, it's awesome. I also know that pretty much every company works freelancers in some capacity and even though it's like a great resource for getting content, there's like quite a few headaches involved in it. Find People and people managing the freelancers, hanging them at all that stuff. So it kind of also falls in the steam of like I want our community to I wanted to provide value. You know, that's like a kind of fluffy thing to say. You know what I would actually provide like monetary value, like you know what I mean, like by being part of this community, I want you to have the opportunity to get money, whether that means like through our job board, where we hope you find your next great career move or maybe, if you're a freelancer, to help you pick up either work on the side or, like, if yes, full time, like I want to pair you up with companies who are going to give you good work, you know, like we make sure you get paid well and paid on time, and so it's awesome, like that transaction nature to it,...

...to me, is actually very important. I don't want this to be a place where it's just like the value is like you meet people. I'd like, truly want the value to be like money in your yeah, yeah, that, we're working on that now. It's at the market places, two and a half months old, like it's not it's not like very well developed, but like we have paying customers and and it's working. So now I have to like learn about market places, which is like it didn't really realize that that's like an incredibly complicated absolutely when absolutely. Yeah. Well, that that is so, so interesting, and it's interesting to hear you describe, you know, creating value or adding value or and for exactly how you described it as as literally like putting money in people's pockets, because from my perspective it sounded like an incredibly valuable experience to be a part of if you're able to get people in there who like that Ama of an anonymous six figure earner. I mean, I can't imagine how valuable that is to someone who's kind of up and coming. I mean that's such a candid conversation that I feel like where else could you possibly have that, like where else could you possibly find that? And then, and then, and then to hear that you're actually, you know, speaking about value in literal terms. Beyond that, I think that is that is so, so neat. And and then to think that it's all happening on slack. So I don't know, that's just really incredible to me. And also you know now that you have this this concept of the market place that you need to understand and all of the ends in the alance outs and nuances of running on a market place. You know that that is real and and that also provides learning opportunity for you. So it's a really, really interesting to me to kind of understand that this is the sort of where the the business has gone. I'm curious. Why is it called stupid bath? That's a good question. It's kind of a bless so when I was at the animals we had. They look kind of like a mascot. I guess who call it is called, okay, lucky cat. Okay, yeah, and it was from what's the Japanese beer? I'm blanking on the name support anyway, lest I. Okay. So, yeah, I think that's a that's like they're thing is super lucky cat instead. Okay, okay, okay, it was super lucky cat became like as like our thing. Like we had like a shared email address for use for Google analytics, and it was like a super lucky cat, you know, yeah, about Super Lucky cout. So, anyways, like kind of like because super brothers, in some ways like a sister company's animals. Like was very much born out of like that experience and actually even like the people. Yeah, the founder that company is like help me, Gata, going sort of barred from that and a path, just sort of a career path, and yeah, you know, cool. I went through about a million names before meting on that one. Yeah, the other reason, the other reason I chose is because thecom is still available. I haven't buy it yet. Yeah, it's not like it's like it's not insane. It's not a mere good. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, it's funny. MIGHT ALL WE'RE gonna yeah by that one day. That's awesome. And then for our audience, I mean those of those who are primed and ready to engage, like how do they find superpath on on slack? What's the best way for them to get involved? So best way superpathco okay, one day, one day we'll get thatcom you can go to get all the infot you know what I mean. It explains what the community is, how it works. There's like a just a short application we ask you to fill out. We don't deny people, it's just like we want to kind of like make sure you're legit. You working? Yep, you work in this field. You know. As you get all that information there and then know you there's links to the job board and the membership. We have ebooks and courses which you can get separately from the membership. All of us area, you know, you'll find all of it. That's awesome. This has been a really enlightening conversation for me. I haven't had a chance to talk to someone with your specific background and you know, again, for me personally, it's a great opportunity kind of understand a little bit about the profession, but then also I think there's a massive opportunity with super bath to find highly qualified, engaged individuals who can help execute a content strategy, whether it's for our company or for any of our listeners companies. So really, really grateful to have the opportunity to speak...

...with you today. Yeah, thanks most and I appreciate the opportunity. Like I said before we chat, I feel like a content marketing is like a there's so much beneath the surface. It's actually like super nuance and I maybe unbiased, a like really interesting world that I feel like it doesn't always give you credit for. So, anyways, I appreciate the chance to go on and on and on about yeah, definitely, and I would love to follow up with you and some time when the marketplace is developed, and understand what some of the learnings are there. I think the idea of, you know, when you have the opportunity to create community, to do it on slack, to understand the ways that you can create value, both literally and potentially figuratively. That, to me, is is really exciting and I think sort of you know, when we think about new things that people are doing effectively, I mean building community, building community on slack in particular. I think is like got to be one of those things. I mean it's just it's really, really unique, and to hear the way that you, you all have executed it's pretty inspiring as well. Well, appreciate you saying that. Yeah, serious, it's been. It's definitely better journey. So, yeah, the kind worths go a long way. Yeah, well, keep it up, Jimmy. Thanks so much, Bob. All Right, thanks for coming on the show. Absolutely. Thanks for listening to growth marketing camp. If you enjoyed this episode, would love it if you would give it a quick five star rating or share it with a friend or colleague looking to give a little more inspiration for their next campaign. You want to learn more about the company behind the show, had to open sensecom. That's Ope, en se en secom will catch you on the next episode.

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