Growth Marketing Camp
Growth Marketing Camp

Episode 26 · 1 year ago

The 5 Must-Hear Moments From Growth Marketing Camp

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Get your rain boots on - marketing wisdom is pouring down on us in this episode as we revisit five of our favorite growth marketing moments. You’ll hear from a viral video marketer, the team behind a man in a pickle suit, and more. If you haven’t tuned in to all our past episodes, this one will catch you up mighty quick. 

Welcome to growth marketing camp, where we sit down with our favorite marketers to de mystify growth and give you the insights to help turn your next campaign into a major success. Let's get into it. Hey, growth marketers, it's REX Biverston, director of sales and marketing at open sense and Camp Counselor here at Growth Marketing Camp. It's time to get your rain boots on, because marketing wisdom is pouring down on us in this episode, as we revisit five of our favorite growth marketing moments. You'll hear from a viral video marketer, the team behind a man in a pickle suit and even more. If you haven't tuned into all our past episodes, this one will catch you up mighty quick. John Timmerman has got the goods when it comes to marketing campaign stories, and this episode he definitely doesn't disappoint. He shares how he helped his client get more in store purchases with an extremely low budget social media contest. If you thought about influencer marketing or cross channel promotion, you're going to eat this one up. What was the goal of this particular campaign? So at the time we had just taken on a global baby products company, really design focused high end baby products in targets and bye bye babies and all of those across the globe. We were working on the US division of it and they had come on and they were struggling with ECOMMERCE, which is funny because that's exactly the type of customer client that good monster works with today. Are Product Manufacturers that have excellent distribution, usually a long history of success in retail, brick and mortar, but they haven't quite figured out ecommerce yet. Nice. So this was that exact scenario. They came to us and they said, listen, we got sales trickling in through our website and we launched D Amazon a few years ago. We haven't really put a lot of effort into it. Websites, you know, it's there, but it's not doing much. We need help. We did all of that stuff and help them in that area. But the specific campaign that popped into my mind when you said that was our first, I would call it Nano influencer campaign. So Nano influencer being like the everyday person with like a thousand to five thousand followers. Yeah, you know, it's not their full time GIG. They just like posting stuff on social media and in the parenting world, especially in sort of the mommy blogger. That's sort of the category it's called. But like the the mom who just loves putting out content about parenting and sharing advice and things like that. There's a ton, there's literally millions of that type of person out there posting content. So they had just launched in target. So they had just struck a deal with target, a distribution deal, and they wanted to figure out how to get the sales up to reach the numbers that target had, the goals that target had for sales, because once that happens, then target advances you and will buy more products and get more distribution and all this kind of stuff, right. So they wanted to make sure that they did that. And so here we are thinking, in addition to all the other things that we're doing for them, the Amazon, the website, the social media, how do we drive sales in store? And then we went through and we're like, okay, well, we could do some go targeted advertising, we could do in store coupe like all that kind of stuff, right, but I'm not sure that's really going to hit. That's going to take a long time. It's not going to be done in the time frame that we need. So our team came up with a really interesting campaign, which was basically this was the campaign to Nano influencers. Basically, anybody could do this right. It wasn't even limited to like one thousand to five thousand. But we ran a contest where you could go into target, take a Selfie with the product on the shelf, and we encourage that. You bring your kids, your family and you take a Selfie with the product on the shelf. You don't even have to buy it, you just go into a target and you take a Selfie with the product and then you put a nice little...

...caption. I honestly can't remember what we asked them to caption, but they it was something cute and funny, and then you would be entered into a weekly giveaway for a hundred dollar target gift card. Nice, so no cost to entry. We opened it up to anybody to post on their own social media, so they would post this that selfie on their own social media and then Hashtag I get and they would be entered into the contest. We got, I thinks, like high hundreds of people that entered the contest. In a couple of weeks, like a week and a half or something like that, but you know, and then the span of their own reach or their own following varied from a couple of hundred all the way up to tens of thousands, or we had a few that had hundreds of thousands of followers doing it. And so it got millions of impressions and all the stuff that I just told you didn't matter. Yeah, point is, though, that they beat their target in store goal by four times, I think, or something like that, in the course of the first month. So when target looks at that, they're like, Holy Shit, like, your product crushed it in these stores. Okay, we're going to roll you out to more. So it was incredibly successful because it cost really no money, obviously like the agencies doing the work and like putting that together, but it cost no money and paid advertising. It got incredible reach and it had a very specific goal, which was to show people that the product was in a target store. Right. So it was just really something I'm proud of that our team came up with an executed flawlessly. Where was the original posting of the content coming from? You said we're not doing paid ads. So was it just their corporate social profile from the actual product manufacture itself? So we sent an email out to their email list. We asked them to share it with all of the parents that they knew. We did post it on social and then I'm pretty sure from a tactical standpoint, I'm pretty sure we boosted that okay, so that the entire audience would see it. I don't think we actually ran a separate add sure I think we boosted that so that it would grow basically by word of mouth, and then we just encourage them to share because it was free. I mean the entire community shot to target right like that. Whole community, along with the rest of us, go to target and get a lot of their home goods and whatnot a target. So we just felt we didn't need to run ADS to do it. We just needed to kind of add a little fuel to the fire that was already happening and I think it's one of those instances where it was just the right sauce on the right meal at the right time because it was something that they're already doing going to target. It was so low cost, low barrier to entry. You already carry your phone you're walking down the aisle, you see it, you take a picture, like you post it on your social it's all the stuff you're already doing and I think that's why it worked so well. Yeah, I love that. If you could do it over again, though, if you could say, Hey, we're going to run the same play but start fresh. The audience is never heard of this, but we know it's going to work, what levers would you pull differently or what would you do differently about that campaign? Quite frankly, we probably just would have gotten a few larger influencers to make the announcement. That's probably the only thing that we would have done differently. Is, instead of the brand change annals announcing it, we probably would have put it in the hands of one or two or more influencers. And if I were to be able to do it again, I mean there were factors at play that kept us from doing this over and over and over again and just, you know, kept it going. But if I were to do it over again, I probably would have had significant influencer announcing it and then running that for the month and then having another influence or the next month doing it again and running was like a partnership and then having it compound. Yeah, so the first influencer, if it was working, they keep doing it, you know, and they do a monthly one and we tweaked it a little bit. We make it fun and engaging and change a little little bit, but would have used some larger influencer activations if we weren't...

...able to do it ourselves. I love that. Has It taught you anything or influenced in any way other campaigns you've done for yourselves or for other customers? Man, I don't know. Like so that was our first nano. So I guess it showed us the value of Nano influencer marketing or just every day I don't even like to turn I don't like the label the Nano Micro. I mean it is what it is and everybody sort of understands it. But everyday people and word of mouth still is the best source of marketing or the best resource for marketing. And so if you can get just your customers, your employees even, and they're friends, as well as sort of everyday people that are interested, if you don't have anything else, if you don't have a budget, if you need some like really quick results, just go to your community these wherever they exist, and try to get them to sort of kickstart that campaign and then measure from there and see if they're it's worth a larger investment. I would say this was our first dive into Nano, so that's sort of taught us the value of everyday people loving your stuff. Jamie punishill's the CMO of translation and localization giant Lion Bridge. In the midst of a terrific interview with open sense cofounder Bobby Nurrainge, Jamie drops an amazing analogy that you need to save in that story bank for the next time your team needs a lesson on modern marketing. How do you manage doubt like as a leader, when you have an entire set of stakeholders that have brought into you? You said ninety five percent turnover and new staff. You're the person that's saying we're turning off to Manin and we're going to execute this plan. How do you, as a leader, deal with sort of doubt, I mean when things don't go your way and in acute situation, I think you know, yeah, you have to be as much of a duck as possible, right, you know, calm on the surface, even if your legs are going crazy underneath, and there's a lot of that in my case. I always I really try to be thoughtful ahead of time. I'm not a let's just jump in and do stuff. I don't come in with a preset view of the the universe, not with any levels of specificity. I've got sort of big principles that I use. But you know, I took my time to understand this organization. It's culture, the people, the pro problems, and I try to do I mean, like in any kind of transformation, at whatever level it is, it's you're like and it's not life for death, but you're like a trauma surgeon, right. I mean the goal that you have to keep the patient alive long enough ultimately to let the patient heal itself. I mean, because that's a real magic of medicine, right. This is doctors don't actually save people. What they do is they prevent death so that the body can heal itself. And I think that's that. That's a lot of the the mentalities. How do I avoid death as long as possible and just keep saving things and, you know, keep a little bit more surgery and a little bit more repaired a little bit more healing until you can then move into hey, let's get strong and let's become an Olympic athlete and those kinds of things. I don't know that there's any magic other than I knew I had hired good people. I knew we had been super thoughtful about the the end state. We were clear on the end state and in some sense, I guess this is like it. You know how to. Founders know. I mean if you have your idea and you're committed to it, you're can have a lot of doubters and a lot of missteps along the way. You've got a pivot. You pivot appropriately. Go just swing in the wind, but recognize when circumstances have changed or victory can come. There's some luck along the way, but luck is usually not missing the things that happen in front of you, because things are always happening. That's that you can take advantage of and surviving the tough there's going to be some tough periods where it just doesn't go well. Keep going back to our my principles. Right. It is the narrative right? Is the end state right? Yes, okay, then the only thing that needs to adjust is the path I take. To me, this is one of the keys to think this could be about any conversation, but I think it's one of the keys to...

...modern marketing. Think of it like a GPS, you know. And so I live in Connecticut. Lionbridge is headquartered in Massachusetts, and so I was driving up almost every week to the Boston area. Every time I got on my car to go, the same two things were true. My starting point was the same and my destination was the same, and that was true every week for however many years. You know, it wasn't the same almost ever. Was the drive right. Traffic is different, weather is different, construction is different and the GPS makes adjustments. And it doesn't just make adjustment week to week, it makes adjustments drive to drive, minute by minute in the drive, and that, I think, is modern marketing right. The objective was clear right. The informations coming in in real time. You're choosing what to adjust to what not to adjust to. Sometimes you can't control it. There's just a ten car pile up in front of you and you're going to get stuck. So that's such a good another I really appreciate you sharing that. That's that's a good one. And I'm going to be thinking about that one all weekend. Jared Stanley is a futuristic marketer in a dated industry. He's the man growing mortgage businesses into the stratosphere. In this clip, jared teaches us how to sell new, creative ideas of the food chain by first trying to get as much of it done with zero budget as possible and showing the outcomes to produce real buy in. The diversity of what I've done sort of has come from a bit of necessity. So I think going back to where I started in marketing, it was more about actually the relationship that I had with my father, and it's an interesting backstory. I have a really great relationship with my dad. And you mentioned music. Music is always been a passionate life. I've been playing it since middle school. I just love playing music and for the longest time I wanted music to be my career. As you more likely know, or anybody who's tried their hand at music, it is very difficult to make a long term, sustainable career through music. That's why people, especially if you're trying to do it like in a band setting, most people end up splintering out into doing things like producing or into do things like subtur support, but, as we've seen, it's a very rocky and tumultuous place to try to make a consistent living. I never wanted to do the traditional business route. My Dad owned his own mortgage brokerage and own his own life insurance brokerage, so I sort of grew up under the cubicle and when I wasn't doing creative work, I was always checking out to see if he needed any help, and I have a really great relationship with my dad, so I wanted to do everything that I could to try to help him. So when I've sort of had a crossroads about what I wanted to do with my life after I graduated high school, I decided I will still do music as much as I can, but I also want to pursue marketing. Marketing was something that I could still be creative in and help people like my father who did not speak the creative language at all. So it was somewhere that I could meet in the middle to one support my family in a sustainable way and support my dad, who I cared about deeply, and still be creative to where I didn't feel like I had a job that was something I didn't look forward to going to every day. So that's really the story. And once I kind of dove into that, I just got all in because I realize that in the mortgage market space this is after the owit crash. So I realized that everything still from that point on, from Fintech to just uiu x in the financial space, not just a mortgage but in the financial space, was awful. That space really hadn't been touched by a lot of what was sort of emerging in other more progressive spaces. So I saw it as an opportunity to really take my best shot at trying to take experiences that I would want to have and build them out everywhere else. Now that was difficult because I had to essentially started under broom clause, which is a laptop, not knowing how to do programming or not knowing how to build a website, not knowing how to shoot the video to host on the website. Like it was just lindacom again. Online resources. You could pretty much learn anything you want online now. So everything that I didn't learn in school I supplemented in real time experience, just trial and error, and it's all sort of culminated over the the, you know, past fifteen years working in mortgages, to where you can build sustainable and impacting brands. You just have to know creatively how to tell that story. I think you there's always an element of continually selling yourself internally, especially when the path forward isn't always, you know, crystal clear. It can be very difficult to ask people to...

...trust you and I think things were a little bit slower moving up front. Like I'm when I go to the owner of the company and say, Henny, you know thirty Fivezeros of by camera equipment, when they've never shot a video in their entire life, it can be a little bit different quolt to get a yes. So, for instance, this gear, I had a bunch of it myself. I came in, I shot a guerrilla style and I shot it as much as I possibly could with the gear that I had and then, low and behold, US our turning out videos and then I use that sort of as a proof of concept. Yeah, it gets back into the idea that you asked me at the beginning of the interview. Why did you learn to do so many things? And the reason I learned to do so many things is so that I could prove that it can be done and then when people that have the money see that it can be done, they poured gasoline on the fire. So lots of times that's how you can kind of get around these initial knows. A lot of times you get around inials because I haven't seen it like, for instance, the builder kiosks. If I go to these builder kiosks meetings and don't bring a kiosk and I just show them a power point of a picture of it, it's esstantially less powerful than if I actually walked them through on the tablet itself and they see it with their own eyes. Sort of the same idea. So, when it comes to pitching, what southern trust was in two thousand and sixteen versus what it is today? Yeah, none of this stuff existed. All of our website stuff was outsource. We had no developers and staff. But we quickly realize that who we wanted to become required more effort than what we could effectively contract. In a way that was like we're we were being penny smart and dollar stupid. So let's be let's take a leap here, let's put some efforts in. This really do a really well rounded project doc and get this stuff done in house and if it fails, we can always pivot back to what we were. But it just you have to take a little bit of risk to be greater than you already ar I mean that's it right like you're comfortable where you are, going somewhere new and being something better as always, uncomfortable for all you bring and builders. You'll want to take notes on this next one. Kate Rooney and Jess Guffy are two of our favorite marketers who cared deeply about their own brand and those of their clients. At design pickle and this interview with the open sense team, they share the hilarious tale of how a man in a pickle suit came to be much more than an event marketing gag and really came to represent their brand in the best possible way. How did we arrive at this place where we have a man in a pickle suit? Well, I guess we can give a shout out to Colton, who is the actual picklestuok Guy. He is our video production manager and he's fantastic. But a strong bearded guy and a pickle suit, something about that image is really striking. So we back in Gosh, what year was that? Two Thousand and hundred and nineteen? Two Thousand and nineteen. Yeah, back in in two thousand and nineteen we were trying to put a promo together for Black Friday side Er Monday, but we wanted to make it different from all of the other black Friday sales going on at the time because it's pretty competitive market. Everyone's doing the same thing. So we thought, you know, we all have these pickle suits. Everyone, almost everyone in the company has one, or you get one year you're hired. So we're like, wouldn't it be interesting to show how this pickle suit can change your life, or kind of like how design pickle can change your life, but through a pickle suit? And so we created this actual short documentary. I mean it's like a minute long, but it's Colton and his pickle sue suts, doing all these amazing things about and it was because he's wearing the pickle suit he's able to do it. The whole thing is so funny. Hasn't like at a wedding at one point? And Yeah, it's it's all about how wearing a giant picklesuit can change your life. I mean I think we all know that just inherently. Yeah, well, we very true. We just but I will say, having warned that picklesuit many times, it does kind of bring out some powers within you that you just didn't even know you had. It could just you feel more confidence. So the whole like the draw was get designed pickle for discounting. Will also give you a free pickle suit, and then the whole campaign around that was different shots of Colton as the picklesuit guy were he later became known as the picklesue guy, and it just like changed everything. We saw just a huge spike in your ship and engagement...

...just from like the video alone, and once we saw that, we like pivoted everything and like made the whole campaign all around picklesue guy. We've got through a lot of changes just with how we do marketing and how we approach marketing, and this is a time that everyone on the marketing team, it was still pretty small, was involved in creative campaigns. We were very much so hands on duck. So I just remember US randomly. I think it was like what the Monday before we had an impromptu meeting and we were like what are we going to do for this? And then someone said it was probably Kate. Hey, what if we made a whole mockumentary about how the pickle suit can change your life? And then it just kind of snowballed from there and everyone was super bought in from the very beginning, and I think that's so rare to find one of those lightning bolt moments of creativity where it actually pays off and works and you see a result, but everyone feels it once it's kind of thrown around and brainstormed on. I think you you added a really good point their chest that I fail to include was that this was all very last minute. Yes, things happen in the start up credibly last minute, and when I mentioned we had to pivot, it was because this concept came in later stages, but once we saw how the results were, was like okay, we got to move on this. This is like we struck gold and we ended up like pulling in over Hundred Twenty K and new revenue just from like that week alone. And to put things in perspective with that, we ran a promo just like a few months prior to this and it raised only six percent of that. So it was like the same discount, same everything, but the addition of the pickle suit and the pile suit guy just blew it up entirely. Yeah, and something else that happened to we put the video out and everyone knew their video was really funny, like people were viewing it, but it wasn't reaching that almost viral point and actually are paid ads. Director at the time was like, Hey, what if we change the video just a little bit so that the hook is in the first six seconds so that if it's popping up on someone's youtube page, they're seeing I wear an enormous pickle suit in my daily life, or they're hearing that rather. And once we change that, we saw a giant spike in engagement and cross channels and the video now is approaching one million views on Youtube, and a lot of that is organic and there are so many comments, I mean so many likes, but people literally have said like, I spent so long trying to figure out if this man was real and where I could find him. I'm starting to think that a pickle suit has answered all my problems. This is the best out I've seen since old spice commercials, things like that that we just never expected when we threw Colton in a pickle suit and paraded him around town and girl a shot the shot. Yeah, so I was two years ago and we're still commenting on it. They're always hilarious comments. So, I mean you mentioned a few times about how I could change everything, like you had to pivot because it was so successful. Even does it continually inform your marketing efforts? Like is it one of those types of campaigns? Yeah, I think. I mean he in a way unofficially became the mask out of our company and I don't even think we reached a point where it wasn't even a thought anymore. It was like, Oh yeah, the pickle suit guy will do this. And a really good example of that is we're doing a partnership campaign at the company called grandology, and there wasn't even a question when we were brainstorming about how we would approach it. We were like, oh no, the pickle suit guy will be dilly Wonka. That's going to be the whole theme of it, and no one questioned it. was just like no, this is happening, and we can talk about all the other examples, but it really just somehow became a staple and everything that we do and if it's not it's like, oh my gosh, where's the pickle suit guy? What are we doing? And it's our logo or company names. Design pickle has pickle in there and we also have a hand drawn pickle guy in our logo, but something about a grown man and a pickle costume just adds that more human touch to it. Of course, having a face in there is always great for marketing and Colton's great. I mean he really he embraces being picklesuit guy, or PSG, as we call...

...him internally. yeal like just say yes G. He's been in almost every campaign we've had, like the the grind ology one is Delly Wonka. Last October we did like a horror movie campaign and it was the pickle suit guys fused and tall these classic horror movie scenes. So it's always there and he'll continue. But we're thinking about expanding it out and having different picklesuit people, you know, whole community, whole are. Is that the collected? There you go, yeah, beautiful, done, love it. Nelio Leone is what you might call a hardcore growth marketer. He's in the micro details of building stellar campaigns for clients at his agency, urban monks, but he's also staying on top of those macro trends, like which channels are really pop it off right now. In our conversation together, he shared a radical perspective on why and how be to be. Marketers need to rethink. They're a roach to digital advertising. If there is one thing that I've learned, and that is the key learning I got, is that you should treat every ad creative that you produced as content. Your ads should not look like ads, because in the right moment where your ads look like ads, what's going to happen is that you disrupt the UX of facebook users or instagram users or tick tock users or whatever users. Why? Because you are not on social media to buy. Social media is not like an Ebay. You're not there to buy, you're not there to sell. You don't have a buying mindset. Well, you do, though, have is I want to get entertained, I want to get informed, I want to get inspired, I want to laugh. Yeah, that is why I'm going on social media. So most of advertisers that I've seen after that and still today, they all come okay, let's do facebook ads, and then they create apps that actually look like ads. Yeah, when was the last time that you clicked on an ad that look like an add almost never. Yeah, that's it. The first thing you do you either like, if you're Nice, you skip it and if you're really pissed that you see something that disrupts your experience, you put like, block it or flag it or whatever. Yeah, because it just like, it just irritates you. So why advertisers still do ads that look like ads, whereas you could convey the same message through entertainment? So using your conversion ads, but with creative concept that are very in tune with all the rest of content that you'll see on in the facebook, instagram, ticktock twitter ecosystem. This is the the big, big, big realization that I had with that slink shot. I said, what if, from now on, all of our ads would look like content? And this is exactly how we reduce by almost fifteen x the cost of acquisition at Washman, because we have these exact same problem. When I went at Washman the first few days, the founder was like, man, forget facebook, let's focus on Google, because we tried facebook. It doesn't work. And the first thing I did I went and look the creatives and I told them it's not facebook that doesn't work. It's the creatives that look like ads. And so the first thing I did I actually took this thing here. It's basically like a war bonnet, and this the only thing I did. I took like my phone and basically I started talking to people, saying Hey, my name is neario from Washman. I had like a Washman key shift and I told them, listen, my name is neario from Washman and the head of growth, and if you download this add right now, if you click that link below, I'm going to come to your place and I'm going to wash all your laundry or something similar. I mean that was more we wash, we dry and we fold, like giving all the value proposition, but in the way that it...

...was very entertaining and that the video look raw because we shot it from an iphone. It was not like it was not high production, it was not like camera lighting, nothing. It was just literally an intern that shocked me while I was just playing around with a camera and that works. That went so liquid that we became a case study for facebook in the region. Amazing, because facebook couldn't realize how come there is this like Super Small Company in Dubai UAE that has like a relevant score. Back then there was still the relevant score. Now it's called quality score of their ads of like nine out of ten consistently for like six months. You know, they were like man, Whoa like? We've never seen this. Yeah, that's amazing. Thanks for joining us on this special recap episode of Growth Marketing Camp. We hope you'll join us next time as we continue to unpack the secrets behind the best campaigns around. Thanks for listening to growth marketing camp. If you enjoyed this episode, we'd love it if you would give it a quick five star rating or share it with a friend or colleague looking to get a little more inspiration for their next campaign. If you want to learn more about the company behind the show, had to open sensecom. That's open, sken skecom. Will catch you on the next episode.

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