Growth Marketing Camp
Growth Marketing Camp

Episode 66 · 2 months ago

The Power of Providing a Personalized Experience for Your Customers with Ryan Cormier

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ryan Cormier’s passion for hunting, camping, hiking, and pretty much everything outdoorsy brought him to Kalkomey Enterprises, LLC - a leader in outdoor recreation education. As their Director of Digital Marketing, Ryan is leading the content team at Kalkomey Enterprises to support customer acquisition, activation, and retention across their portfolio of online safety education courses and their HuntWise app.

Ryan joins us on this week’s episode of Growth Marketing Camp to share what his team’s top goals are, the ways they prioritize work to achieve them (& support other departments), and how they align with the rest of the company.

He also shares the importance of setting your customers up for success and how they manage to do so at Kalkomey Enterprises. So put on your hiking boots, and tune in!

Welcome to growth marketing camp, podcast, powered by open sense, where we sit down with leaders and founders from diverse backgrounds and marketing, tech and beyond to explore what it takes to build a leading brand that's shaving the world of B Two B let's get into it. Hey, everybody, welcome to another sitting episode of Growth Marketing Camp. I'm your host, jazz bidding. This week I'm excited to welcome Ryan Cormier, WHO's currently the director of digital marketing at Calculm I enterprises. Ryan, it's great to have you all the show. Welcome. Yeah, thanks, Jess. I really appreciate you having me. Yeah, no, I'm I'm especially excited that, you know, the two of us are talking because it is a Friday for you and I'm sure you've got fun plans for the weekend. Are you planning on doing anything fun? Yeah, my daughter just started school this week, so we've got kind of a welcome brunch tomorrow morning and I think we'll probably just hang out around the house and hopefully relax a little bit. Very nice actually, so that your daughter is very to you, by the way. She's so thank you. Yeah, she started kindergarten. Yeah, it's really exciting. That's in she's her is she your first child? Yeah, first and only right now. We'll have some more. But what has been the most I'm not a parent. I hope to be a parent one day and actually don't know a lot of parents yet. I actually haven't been around kids in almost five ten years. What is one of the most amazing things? I guess she has taught you about life since you since you've had her. Yeah, I would just say curiosity, some of the things that she picks up on and calls out. They really just kind of hone you in on how fast life goes and how sometimes you can just dismiss certain things, and just the joy that she finds in really simple things is inspiring and kind of reminds me what what really matters in life. Now I love that. Um, the last time I did interact with Um a child, which is so crazy to say that because you probably are surrounded by kids all the time. Yeah, yeah, it's funny. We're at that sphase in life. It's like most of my social beads are just friends, kids and birthdays and now back to school, so it's yeah, we're definitely in that world. Yeah, I'm definitely in the social feed world right now, where it's all about dogs and dog parents cat parents, and I will get to that point in one day. But no, it's it's awesome, and I know the last time that I did interact with a child, um, she was basically doing these like handstands and then asked me to do it and I was like, Oh, why can't do it? And she's like why? Why can't you do it? And I was like because I'm too big to be able to do that and I don't have the flexibility, and she's like, well, you don't know if you don't try, and I was like wow, it's that kind of stuff that, in a sense, where it's like we automatically will second guess ourselves and we'll just continue to not do things if we feel like he hasn't worked in the past. But I found that to be extremely a profound observation, which you don't realize that, but it was awesome because she was about six years old when she mentioned that, and I'm like, yeah, I should, I should take this advice. Yeah, that's cool. Yeah, Mine's five and a half, so she's definitely in that same zone where she'll call you out for stuff and then sometimes say things and you're like yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Yeah, yeah, no, I love it. But right now, besides being a parage, you're also busy. Um, you are Director of marketing at CALCOM enterprises, right. So why don't you talk to me about what it is that you guys do at l and who is your guys target audience? Yeah, so we're kind of an interesting I would call us a technology and education company. So we are the largest certifier within the US as well as in Canada, for primarily voter and hunter safety programs. So, especially during covid a lot of that education went all online. And so, Um, whether you're up in your neck of the woods, up in Canada, Transport Canada's your governing body, sort of get a pleasure craft operator, car D C O C, you would take one of our courses as well as down in the states. And then anybody who's going out hunting, not not everyone is state required to get a hunter education...

...certification, but quite a few people do. It's just a good thing to do to be safe in the outdoors. Um. So we provide online forces to facilitate that education and then sort of buy those students on behalf of the states. Um. And then our company also acquired company out of Michigan last year that has hunt wise. So Um, it's an APP that helps hunters. We've got predictions and a lot of really great tools and has some cool functionality as well that people used for fishing and camping and hiking. So pretty much we cater to outdoor enthusiasts in general. So well. So you guys, Um, since you've acquired this other company, you're now having to build out a strategy to try to get more users on this APP. Yeah, so it's a really interesting my role is is really cool. So we have the education side, where we're focused on again providing that education, and then we've got the APP, which has been a whole new world for me over the last year really diving in and learning about that, which has just been an absolute blast. In terms of the education, are you guys tapping into like the end user of the we're taking of courses through specific governing bodies or Um, like other industries like, are leazing directly with them, we're going straight to the consumers. Yeah, a little bit of both. So the states that certify us, you go through and get approved at the state level with like whatever the governing body is. So they approve us and then like all of their websites list us as a certified provider Um. So we do get a lot of customers that come through referrals as well, through the states, as well as just, you know, our own marketing through organic S C O, Paper Click. We're starting to delve a little bit more into the social media world. But yeah, a lot of people kind of seek out because they realize, hey, I have to have this thing, so they'll go on and that's where we really meet the customer and, you know, primarily a lot through search. We've got it. And then how large is I know you are a director of marketing at Telcom. I how large is yours? What does the marketing team look like? Yeah, so we have I think we're at eight people in the department. Now we've got like a revenue operations team. We recently went through kind of a re ORG UM and come buying forces because we had a lot of different marketers and folks in different like we've grown a lot through acquisition and so we had a lot of those teams that now we've brought them together so under my umbrella is really like our content marketing team. So I've got two direct rewards, one of uh that she manages two more designers, and then Matt's kind of my right hand and he's got some folks underneath him that are like content automation specialists, and we're doing really closely on a really cool new marketing automation product integrating a new tool called braise, which has just been a blast to work with and we're really excited to get that get that going here within the next couple of weeks. Yeah, I've actually heard of braise. I actually seen them all over my socials. That's a tool that you guys are using right now. Yeah, so that's gonna be really beneficial for us to enable us to do a whole lot more from an automation personalization standpoint. Vote for our education business as well as the hot wives APP. It's been a while since I've actually looked into what raised does. Would you compare them to like a hot spot or I would? Yeah, and I'm a big long time hub spot fan. Was the user there. So yeah, it's definitely a lot like hub spot and they have really done a phenomenal job just going above and beyond four APPS. So they've got integrations with our IOS and Android APPs as well as web. So there's just a lot of complexity to it. And, Um, they've got a tool called Sandi's is that lends you build out these insane flows based on users actions. So, Um, it's really helping US level up and provide a more personalized, value based experience based on Hey, we see you've been doing these things. They're not doing these things either in your educational course or within the APP. Um, and providing a lot more personalized experience for our customers. And then hunt wise, the APP. Is this your first time experience working with an APP and trying to get users using it, and that's your first time. How is acting? It is it's been awesome. It's just it is a complete different world. Um, you know working primarily you know and have an ad agency background. So this is the first time I've really gotten to fully immerse in one company, one ecosystem, Um,...

...and so even just learning the complexities of a lot around attribution and really especially with the latest changes with APP tracking, transparency and the IOS changes and privacy, that's been a big learning curve for me as well. But you know, even just getting to work with technology like braves. It's really been incredible to see what's possible, Um, and I'm really excited for just coming I mean we're coming into hunting season now, which is a very big time of the year for us. Um, and even just looking ahead and just I feel like I've leveled up more in the last twelve months that I had at any point in my career, which is just super exciting. Yeah, I know, I'm sure it is. Um. I had a very brief time when I was actually intern working with a company that had launched an APP very similar to like what's that? But Um, this was before blockchain and stuff. It was like Mesh networking communication. It was meant for students who were in college, mostly in developing countries, which is there was a lot going on, but I remember there was so much to do and learn and understand, everything from trying to get the users to download ap to how do you get them to open it up again, how do you, just, like you mentioned right, set up the traders, um where the points are falling off, and it's Um, a lot of just requires marketing, engineering, doing tons of research. So it sounds like you, you and your team are having to do a lot with hunt wise. Curious now that you are obviously the you guys are leading the marketing at Calculi and you've got this APP. How is the how is your work changed sit and you're kind of how you structure Um, you guys responsibilities since you guys acquired hunt wise? Yeah, that's a great question. Um. You know, going through the re order was really big for us and just kind of aligning resources. We put together a lot more process just for communication as well as how we complete work within the organization. Um, and that's been phenomenal. We just, you know, it's really kind of changed the way that we do business. So it is. You still you have to kind of put on two different hats and think about them, because they are two very different businesses. But what we're doing on the education side is just focusing on continuing to provide value to those students. So after they come through and get their certification, what can we do to help you continue to have success in your outdoor pursuits? Um, and then you absolutely nailed it. On the hunt wise side. It's not just about, you know, acquiring a new customer. Things like you're onboarding experience. How do you get people to experience the value of the APP as quickly as possible and then you know, how do you see what they do? How do they interact with the product Um so that you can continue to provide more utility and value for them? So it's just been a really fun process getting to know that and I would say just a lot of the the changes and going through the acquisitions was really just communication. Is what it all boils down to. And how aligned are we against? You know where we headed, what our goals as a company, and then you kind of reverse engineer from there. What are the things that we need to do to drive the needle on both the education side of the business as well as the APP and hunt wise two very nicely transitioned to my next question. Actually, I was curious what are your team's top goals? I know you just mentioned you you guys want to align with the goals of the company, specifically now that you guys have this new APP that you're also working on. What are your team's top goals? Maybe this year and Um, sometime next. Well, this year is basically I can't believe it's cute. It's cute. Three, yeah, that's crazy and it's like Christmas, like checkout town. We're even my team. We're scrambling like you guys. We need to get stuff done because it's going to be chill time, you know, at the end of next quarter. But we got a plan for the following year. What are your, your team's goals for the rest remainder of this year and next year? Yeah, so, uh. I mean just with the nature of our business being so seasonal, obviously we've got the hunter education component which is really ramping up now. Um, this is a time of year when we're going to see a lot of students come through and get their certification, as a lot of people go hunting, kind of your general public from like...

October through the end of the year. Some of your more hardcore folks are getting out earlier on different seasons, but really just providing a the best experience possible for the education students, not only the certification, but also building out kind of continued value add content. So you've gotten certified, let's, you know, provide great value through our content of how do you go out and have success in the field and then on the hunt wise side, it's really kind of like we talked about just getting people to have a great experience with the APP, really helping them on board, because it's a very powerful tool. There's a lot of AI built in. We've got some sophisticated algorithms that you know, a lot of people have to decide if they're going to take off work and take time away from friends and family to go out and get into the field, and so we've got hunting prediction technology built into the APP. So it's really helping people understand how can you leverage that so you can actually see a forecast seven, maybe up to fourteen, fifteen days out, what's the likelihood that you're going to have success on any given day based on a number of factors. So it's really just setting people up for success. Like they're passionate about the outdoors, they want to get out, they want to have success, so it's really just how can we be a part of that journey and really help them have success? And it's as much about this success in the field as it is just making memories. You know, there's a lot of great time spent around campfires and at Camp and I mean we're all huge lovers of the outdoors, so we want to just help create great experiences, great memories for people and help them do that safely. Yeah, yeah, I know, I like that and I like how it comes back to you guys and you guys guiding principles. I can imagine the outdoor community, specifically hunters. They resided certain channels and so I'm just curious how are you guys reaching out to them, whether it's the educational courses or trying to get them aware about your APP? Um, what are the different head marking channels you are using and the formats? Right? Are you doing as occasional content via written word, or is it videos? Yeah, so we've got I mean we're definitely big on S C oh so we've got a heavy presence. Involve the paid inorganic listing, so a lot of text based ads. A lot of the content that we have currently is written Um, and again we try to focus on value there, so answering frequent questions and helping with like how to type content. On the hunt wise side, we we delve pretty heavily into social media, which is a great space for hunters. Um. A lot of people are active on facebook, instagram, starting to get more into Tiktok as well. So we try to go meet those customers where they're at and we're really focusing on building out a lot more video content, specifically some custom photography. There's just a lot of great work happening in the industry to continue to add value, even things about, you know, recipes for preparing game and things like that. Um. So that's something that's going to be a big focus for us through the end of this year and then as we go forward into three and beyond. Is really just creating amazing content that adds value to that audience and again, just helps them have six ask and have the most fun with the sport. Yeah, I know, I like that. And you mentioned like recipes. Is that like cooking? Yeah, yeah, absolutely. So, like, you know, if you're a deer hunter and you've got some venicine and a backstrap, like preparation techniques, things like that, different recipes that you can try out. Um, again, just a lot of value and things that we can provide beyond just the experience of the APP or your your hunter education course. Well, I love that. I'm one of the previous guests that we had. They kind of shared a similar strategy where, Um, they want to kind of set themselves up as be basically the one stop shop to everything, Um, so people don't have to leave the community, they do not have to seek information out elsewhere. So I like that you do that. And obviously you know, because I picture linked. Did I know it said you open up a SAUCEPA for cooking again, Um, then you mentioned that if you weren't going to if you weren't a marketer, you probably be a chef. So what are the similarities that you've known? It's based off of the work that you apparently daring and had you chosen that happen. Yeah, I think a lot of...

...it comes down to you know, some of the biggest similarities between that I see, between marketing and cooking is just experimentation. You know, there are tried and true things where you can follow a recipe and you can have a great amount of success, but my wife and I are huge foodies and so every city we go to we just try to eat our way through it. That's like New York City is like one of our favorite places on earth. And really, when you have that amazing experiences when someone has done something unexpected that you haven't seen before. Um, and I think you know great experiences come from experimentation, pushing boundaries, you know, trying new things, and so I just I see a lot of similarities there as well, and honestly a lot. I waited tables all throughout college and I think that that really taught me a lot for my career as well, and just communication, how to collaborate well with team members, Um, just customer service in my previous role in the agency world, conflict resolution, things like that. I just I think there's a lot of similarities between like cooking is well as food service that translate really well into what what I do as a marketer. Yeah, I know that's so true and I love that you're a Foodie as well, and so is your wife. When I travel and we might meet my husband trouble. I'll try to find the flood places, but he tries to find the hikes and I'm not a big hiker, like but I'm like yeah, you know, don't don't like I don't mind doing a hike if it's within a radius, like a fifteen mile radius, to like a coffee job or something and reception, and he's like yeah, no, and I think I think it's funny you mention that because now he's I have been exposed to hikes and like willderness, plate willderness, adventures that I normally wouldn't to have, and he's been exposed to actually like appreciating different kinds of restaurants, and it's awesome that you and your wife have similar similarities. Yeah, that's cool. Well, that's a great it's a great duo because you can go on the hike and you can build up a really amazing appetite and then you can satisfy that and get something Um, and that's it keeps keep stuff exciting. Now, just kind of focusing a little bit on what you do day to day. How would you how does your week structured? And it could be just any week, but mostly with the stuff that you're focusing on. Yeah, that's a great question. So, I mean a lot of my week it's honestly, fairly unstructured, to be honest. Um, it's always been that way and maybe that's just because I'm not the most organized person, but you know, we do have I've got scheduled one on ones as well as team meetings. Uh, you know, leadership meetings and things like that, where really just got to keep pace with what's going on within the organization? What are other teams priorities? As the marketing team and content team, we really are a ton of a service center. We're almost like an agency within the company Um. So we have to know what everybody needs at any given time and be able to prioritize that. And now I really like to leave a lot of flex time. You know, things come up that are unforeseen, so jumping in, helping out with tasks, as well as just working with the team to prioritize and execute on the work that we know we you to get done. Obviously, again, we're coming into a very busy time of the year for us with hunting season, so I just I try to be available to my team and my colleagues as much as possible and really just jump in and support Um wherever and however I can. I like that, you may said, and I asked this next question now selfishly because Um I also this year had taken on a new role and I'm leading the team and I'm also, you know, the point person with all the other departments and, as you know, ru night marketing teams are oftentimes the service centers first for the rest of the departments and Um how do you mentioned you prioritize? Right, you're still having to do your fulfill your guys as schools and do your own work while also servicing the rest of the departments. How do you prioritize the stuff that that sort of leads you get from other departments alongside your own? Yeah, great questions. So I would say it's it's kind of two pronged, right. Like you looked at the level of urgency and need, like if we have a state partner who has a need or there's something that...

...comes up that's a very high priority for us, we we really want to take great care of our our state customers. And then you also look at things through just what's the potential impact. You're good or bad? Um, is it something that we really need to jump on to mitigate something that may have come up that's less an ideal, or is there a major opportunity that we think hey, if we come in when we prioritize this project, could this really help with a conversion rate or something like that that ultimately has a revenue impact? I would say those are kind of the two lenses will look at things through to really figure out, Um, what does it make sense if we you know, we work on a sprint schedule. So every two weeks we've got everything really dialed in, Um, and so you really have to look at the trade offs as well as say, okay, based on what we have on the current roadmap, where can this spit in? What would we have to you know, maybe trade if we want to fit this in? And so it's kind of looking at a lot of different pieces to really figure out a take. What do we need to get done in this two week time span? And then we kind of reprioritize every two weeks so that we're always current and always focused on the top priorities. Yeah, I like kind of making those decisions in context of like two weeks, right, and then also in context of things, Um, that may impact revenue, what you mentioned before. So that's that is for sure. Um, what do you think are the most important skills in your role right now? Yeah, I mean definitely prioritization, just like we just talked about collaboration again, like we are a fairly large organization and we've got a lot of different departments that are working on different things at any given time. So just really making sure that we are, you know, in close communication at all times, really understand what the various departments are working on Um so that again, as they need support from our team or vice versa, that's clearly communicated and we've got that all in our project management tool. We're following up on things so they don't fall through the cracks, and then really just testing and staying curious. It's really easy to get things off the ground and you kind of move on, but we've got very much at testing and analysis mentality where it's like, okay, let's get something out the door, let's understand nothing is going to be perfect, and then let's see how that performs out in the marketplace. And then let's read this at that and say, okay, what can we tweak? If it's an email, Taden's different sent times, different subject lines, different creative Um. We're always tinkering and testing to see what we can do, not only to improve business outcomes for ourselves, but also, again, to to provide the best possible experience for our customers. And since Um, since you guys have been working with hunt wise and you're building out that APP and obviously the world that you were doing for Telcom, I what would you say is your biggest challenges that you guys are faced in your team. It's just, you know, there are a million and one things that we would like to do. So prioritization and just resourcing as well. Um, you know, I wish we had a massive team, but you know, we, we, just we at times there are resource constraints. So again, it just comes down to as an organization, and then that kind of boils down to the different teams and departments of what are the top priorities that are going to help us hit our organizational goals, Um, and then how do we do that work the most effectively? and Um, it is. It just, you know, that goes back to communication across teams. Anytime you're dealing with software and development, you've got testing, you've got bugs and things that come up. So, Um, it's really just, you know, staying in really tight communication so that we, you know, are doing the best possible work. And Yeah, just, you know, doing the work that's going to achieve those goals for us and for our customers. Yeah, it's especially when you realize any I'm guessing, are you guys? I'M gonna NOT gonna make the assumption. You guys remote. Are you physically going into an office? Yeah, primarily, and we're spread out across the US and Canada as well. So yeah, mostly remote. I do get into the office up and it's in Richardson, which is about a little over an hour for me with traffic. But yeah, primarily remote. And then our in grand rapids, Michigan. They they get the most face time and...

...they spend a lot of time in the office, but they're very much kind of hybrid up there. Yeah, that definitely makes it that much another you know that it's like a unique twist to this challenge because, you know, I've also experienced the same thing. Um, we've been at open since, I've been at open since for us, so we for for about three years now, remote and even remote pre covid and I remember getting the team just communicating actively and, you know, not know what how much is enough and how much is too much had always been a challenge early on and then obviously when you start using using different tools, project management tools, it gets that much easier. But having staid like they're still burnout right. There's people who were also dispersed. We're all over. I'm the and the only person in Canada, so I just don't gonna say on the Canadian divisions of Topany but mostly everyone's dispersed. We have different times that we're working. Same with my team. I haven't actually physically met my team yet until I'm going two in November finally. But I think it's like actually getting together having some of the most necessary conversations that need to be had in person when you have had that facetime, but then actually maintaining the different projects and stuff using the different tools. You mentioned that you guys are using a few different tools. Braizles one of them. What are some other tools that you're using that you would find to be indispensable to the work that you're doing? Yeah, definitely Monday dot Com for project management. We transitioned all of our ticketing systems over to that, all of our project management for the various departments. That was huge, just getting everything in one place. It's become a really potent tool for us. Um We use slack as well. We were on teams for a while. Move Back to slack. That's been great too, and it's it's a double edged sword. Like you said, there's a lot of different ways to communicate, so sometimes it's a juggling act. And I'm like, okay, was that a slack conversation? was that an email? Is that in Monday? But those are some of the core kind of communication tools that we use in project management. And then on the marketing side we use a tool called FIGMA, which is really amazing for like prototyping and even just doing mind maps if we're going to map out email tadences and things like that. Um, that's become really indispensable for us and it's so nice to just be able to go in there and collaborate in real time. will be on a video call, you can see where people are clicking. We're analyzing designs together, Um, and you can really collaborate extremely effectively with some of those tools. So those are some of the favorites that, if they went away, would would definitely make life harder. Yeah, we use Monday. Love Monday can I cannot live without it. I even created up personal Monday board for me. For my I've done the same, which is like Super Dordy, but awards. Um also used pigma. Also you slack. I've also experienced they oh, is this like a slack conversation as an email conversation? When I actually came into my role, just because the people on my team were all very different. We all have very different needs and different levels of focus. Things that can pull you out and we actually, Um, I I had I interviewed the team and we came up with them like a collaborative communication doc for how we're going to be interacting as a team and when is email necessary, when slacked, and then we actually have a day dedicated to absolutely no slack, because some people on the door like it is so important for them to have like focused time, especially we're doing creative work and being pulled out of that just for flack banter things like that. I'm like, okay, I think that has been great and yeah, we tested it out, it worked great and now, Um, we've kind of baked it into our communication process. But it is so important and you didn't realize how important this stuff is until you have a unique situation you can't see people and interact with them. Yeah, yeah, that's huge. But I have a couple more questions and then we can move to rapid fire. I know you've you're very, very active on Linkedin. So kind of curious how have when? When did you actively start using Linkedin, and why are you using it? How are you interacting with people in building relationships and building a network? Yeah, so I...

...really got active on Linkedin, I think, as a lot of people did, during the pandemic, during lockdown. So at that time in my career I was working at a great ad agency here and Fort were. I transitioned into more of a business development role and really helping market the agency. Helped drum up new business and so it was the ideal tool. I mean it wasn't cold calling, it was connecting with DP of marketing, CMO, whatever role it was, and really getting targeted with, Hey, this is a really cool brand, we would love to do work for them. So I kind of got into it with that and then I really saw some people that were just kind of crushing personal branding and I think that's when that really started to ramp up as well. Um, I got really interested in it, started creating content on a daily basis and that kind of snowball. Made a lot of mistakes along the way, but I've I've forged some really good relationships. I've actually got a couple of good friends that I met on Linkedin that I traveled out to Utah and we fly fishing with when we we keep in touch. I talked with my buddy tanner on an almost daily basis. So actually afford some really good friendships there and now I guess I keep it going. But just really for me personally, to build a personal brand, and it was instrumental in me getting my job that I have now. So a recruiter reached out, she saw some of my content, she saw my profile. Like you said, you know into cooking, the outdoors and all of that, and that was ultimately what opened the door for me to join calcum I. And why? I think just being present and active on Linkedin, whether you're sharing content or you're just hanging out and engaging with people. Um, it's just it's going to create opportunities for you in your career that you never thought existed, and so I kind of just view it as a continued investment in my career. Um, I figure the more you know, I can build up my personal brand be seen as an expert in marketing. I also like to just, you know, post things that I hope inspire people. So, Um, that's really a big part of why I do it. Is really just career growth. Yeah, yeah, yeah, eating at the job because that's how we learned about you and that's why we read. So thanks. Yeah, it's perfect. I mean exactly, this is this is an opportunity that would not have otherwise probably existed for me. Yeah, totally, especially Talcobi and then growth marketing campus is the outdoor camping thing exactly. That's perfect. What is one book you would recommend it to your audience that that has been very helpful for you, and why? To our audience? Yeah, so Simon Sinect. I'm a huge fan of him. START WITH WHY? I really just I think that's a phenomenal book and message of just really understanding the why behind what you're doing. Um, I think when you can kind of unlock your passion, I think people perform best when they see a really emotionally connected to the why behind the work that they're doing. So for me, as an outdoor enthusiast, like enabling people to get certified to be safe when they're out on the water, when they're out in the sea, of off roading whatever, Um, that's huge. I mean I see great potential for that. It literally saves people's lives. And then even with hunting Abbit, you know, yeah, there's a commercial aspect but it goes back to what I was talking about earlier and just creating amazing memories. I mean, you've got a lot of heritage with hunting. It's a lot of you know, it's passed down from friends and family members, and so I think for me are why really goes back to just helping people create great memories in the outdoors. Um. So that book has really framed a lot of that mindset for me and I definitely think it would be a mustery for for anybody really. I just think it's a phenomenal book. Awesome. Yeah, we're putting together a list from our growth marketing camp guests, which is why, and we're going to be giving it away to that of our subscribers sometime next quarter. So we will definitely add that it. And you know what, what I love about Simon Sinek and that book in particular, especially when you're the world of marketing, there is so much to do and so often, especially if you're experimenting, you could test something out and something else comes along or maybe CEO or someone else says hey, what about this and you're very you're often times you risk very quickly abandoning something that could have worked...

...longer if you just focused on why you were doing it in the first place, so you don't abandon things. So I do love that. I love that book. I also have it in my collection. Now let's move on to rapid fire. I always tell the guests, I'm like, you don't have a lot of you gotta just do it very, very fast. But they find of picking for a bit. So if you're a picking for a bit, totally Um. Let's start with the first question. What is your favorite B Two b brand and then your favorite B Two c brand? Oh Man, honestly, I mean I go back to even though I don't currently use the tool. I love Hubspot. Like people in my company even joke. They're like, are you on the payroll? Do you own a bunch of hub spot stock? Because I love talking about it and Hubspot has a special place in my heart because they helped me grow so much in my career. I mean that company they really created inbound Um. They gave away so much value. I think it's just absurd. And I'm also a huge Gary Vayner Chuck Fan, and he's the give, give, give, before you ask for anything. So I can't tell you how many times I figured things out just from reading their blogs and then when I had the opportunity to run my own digital agency, we were a hubspot partner, so it was a tool that we could go out it was actually a product and a service that we could combine and provide for our customers. So I just think that they've done a phenomenal job over the years of really helping people create great businesses and then create impact for their customers. I just think that they're Um really second to none business to consumer. One of the brands that I love is howler brothers. So they're based out of Austin, Texas, so they've also got the Texas appeal, but they've just done a fantastic job creating a really cool lifestyle brand that for someone like me who loves the outdoors. I'm also really an avid fisherman, so they're big in surfing as well, but just outdoors in general. I love the content that they create. I love their clothes, so I really love seeing how they've grown and what they've done to market themselves over the years. All Right, nice hubspot. Love it. It's a first kind of resource. I used to also learn about marketing when I when I graduated Cup because we were using hubspot at the company that I was working at. Um, and conference is coming up next month too. Yeah, inbound. Oh Man, some of my my favorite career memories are being out there again. I had a small digital agency and we had four of us at the time and we were all working remote and we got together, blew everybody out to inbound in Boston and just had an absolute blast. So I've definitely a hub spot is near and dear to my heart, for sure. Yeah, no, I love that. When I'm so Wy, there best way to wind down, oh gosh, I mean for me get outside. I also love to exercise, to go on getting in a good workout, sweating, but anytime I can get away and Unplug, whether it's hanging outside with the family, playing with my daughter in the backyard, swimming Um or if I can get away and go camping, hiking, hunting fishing, I just think that, uh, fresh air is great medicine. So you know that for me is always really powerful when I can just unplug, get off my phone, Um and just get out the worst. Yeah, yeah, I know, I love that one too. If you have to eat one thing for the rest of your life, Sushi? Yes, oh my gosh, I totally eat Sushi. That's so I had when I when I wrote that question down, I'm like, what is the one thing? I could literally eat Sushi every single day and I'll get tired of it. Sushi and Roman? Yeah, it would. It would get weird at breakfast. But I think that you could get really inventive and make some cool breakfast Sushi. And actually, you know what, that's a smart answer because, Um, first I was thinking ramen. It would be hot all the time, but sometimes you want something cold and fresh. But SUSHI could be hard. We could be cold, UM and right to have different fishes and meats and stuff and it's kind of healthy. Yeah, it is. Well, it's funny you say that, because my wife loves, we love Thai food, and it's like it'll be a hundred and four out in summer and she's like I really want tie and I'm like, you know, like soup just doesn't sound great right. Um, when we had the heat weight here, I...

...was craving ramen so much, but I'm like, I'm literally dripping sweat in me having a hot broth, like. So I did a yeah, Um, what is your favorite movie? Oh Man Gosh, that's a huge question. I really gotta I've got to think on that one. For TV show, my favorite TV show is it's always sunny in Philadelphia's definitely not for everybody. It's hilarious. I think it's actually the longest running comedy on TV. Um, I think they're into fifteen seasons now. But Um, there was just a period in time when I was in college and I didn't have cable and so I lived on it's always sunny box sets, um, and it's just the most ridiculous, absurd show ever. It cracks me up, you know, if I'm in a bad mood, I had a rough day or something, I can always lean on it's always sunny to cheer me up. Yeah, I know, I like I haven't heard of it, but I'll google it right after this in this conversation. When are you most productive? Honestly, usually in the evenings, I think, just because of so what I is so much of what I do as a managers just support the team. You get pulled into meetings and all of that. You know, once I put my daughter to bed a lot of times to my wife and I will just say, okay, let's spend a couple of hours and we're both gonna work and then we'll netflix and chill. Um. So, and it is pretty crazy how much you can accomplish in a few hours of truth, just focused work. Um, I feel like usually in an hour or two I can get done a full day's work and also just kind of helps me get into a little bit more creative or analytical mindset, whatever I'm working on at that time, just when I'm able to truly focus and not have to task switch and my brain's not jumping all over the place. Yeah, I love that. So you're the first person that I've asked that to you so far that has said like evening. Most people daytime or afternoon. I'm very much the exact same way throughout the morning. Well, in the daytime, like at seven am, I don't have a pulse after I got my first coffee in around eight or nine, then I'm like okay, but I just need to just get focused. I'm functional and I'm not like you know, Um, I'm not in like my tribal state around two PM, but I am at my most creative date and get the most done after dinner when I'm when I have to just the peace to be able to work quietly by myself when the rest of the team is offline. Don't catch up and it's all the enjoyable for me. Like I enjoy that time. So I'm glad that. Yeah, I'm not. I'm in the same I'm I am not a morning person. And the other thing that I love too, about remote and you know about Calculm I as well, on our culture is, you know, they understand that like life gets in the way. So I take my daughter to school every morning, I go pick her up. So there are times where I just take care of life and so to be able to get caught up and do some work in the evenings, I don't mind it at all. Typically I love to just shut down and spend time with the family, but I get to intersperse that throughout the day so I don't feel like I'm missing out. I'm still able to do high quality work. So it just it works out really well. Yeah, yeah, and all, and that's Um, that's awesome that talking like that. Very similar experience here. What ice cream flavor are you you know, I want to say chocolate, but honestly vanilla. I had my one of my college roommates turned me on to just plain old Blue Bell Vanilla and I was like, dude, you're crazy, but I love it and you can always add chocolate. I'm a huge Chocoholic, but I don't know, something about just some good old fashioned vanilla. For somebody who loves flavor, that's pretty plain, but I just I love it. Yeah, no, no, I like that, Dude. Vanilla is great. What is your spirit animal? Probably an OWL. I've just always loved owls that are a hawk. Um, I just yeah, I think hawks are just fascinating and dutiful. We've got a bunch of them here in Texas, a lot of red tailed hawks. I just think they're gorgeous creatures. They're great hunters. Um, they're just really, really interesting animals and, you know, all all pretty intelligent as well. Um,...

...is the I just I'm making this one up. But what is the most unique or the coolest animal you've seen in the outdoors? Oh Man, I would say I mean it's not like crazy unique, but seeing a massive alligator in person, like earlier this year, the International Hunters Education Association, I H A, had their conference this year in Florida, so got to go out with to that with some of the team and we did a tour out in the everglades and you know, it's one thing we take our daughter to the zoo. We've got an awesome zoo here. You can see him behind glass, but to be in a fan boat like six FT away from a fourteen foot alligator was a pretty wild experience. Definitely makes your hair stand up a little bit. So that was really cool. And then seeing a Bald Eagle in Alaska was really neat as well. It's just a super iconic bird. We went up there and did some salmon fishing quite a few years ago and it was just really a majestic creature that just kind of makes you stop and stare and you say wow, it's really cool. Yeah, no, all that. The alligator sounds terrifying, but it sounds very, very cool. Have you seen the show alone? I have. Yeah, okay, so I guess I'm making this question up to but if you have to carry three items with you, if you're going to be on that show, what are the three items that you care for survival? Yeah, I mean definitely. You know, if you could, if I could combine a bow and Arrow, I think that that would be pretty critical. Um, just seeing those people, especially when they get into the winter and they're having to hunt for food and sustenance. That would be beneficial absolutely, like slint or a fire starter. I don't think I could do the rubbing sticks together. I think it would be very cold and or breeze to death. So that and then just a good nice as well, you know, or a saw. I love seeing all the crazy homes that those people make, but I think just to have a utility tool like a knife or a saw or something would be pretty critical in a survival situation. Yeah, and it's great that you came up with three awesome examples, like on the spot. So you've been thinking about this. Yeah, and I just binged the eight a season not too long ago, so it's fairly fresh. Yeah, my husband's watching it and I was like trying to get him to change the channel and then he's like, come on, we always watch your show. Then that I was like kind of like fine, I'll just do my work, but halfway through my eyes kept leaving my laptop and I was watching and now I'm like hey, we should watch alone. Yeah, it's pretty interesting and I get so excited when they like catch a bish or there was a guy on this latest season who made a canoe. Like. These people are incredible. So, if I don't know which season we were watching, but there was one where the lady won't stop eating squirrels, like why did she love squirrels? And Look, I beg you, when she goes back to real life, she will still try to catch and eat squirrels. Yeah, no doubt. Finally, last to where can listeners find you online? Yeah, so I'm on linked in. Um, just google. You know, Ryan Cormier, I'm there. I'm also pretty active on twitter as well, at Ryan J cormier. Those are the two platforms set I'm primarily on. I'm on Instagram as well, but I do the private account thing and try to keep that to uh, you know, friends and family and things like that. Is certainly open to people following as well. They're just going to see a lot of pictures of my daughter, my dog food and then various fishing and hunting adventures. Yeah, no, I love that and Um, Googl do you think that we should invite next on the show? Oh Man, that's a great question. You know, there's a guy that I've been following for a while. His name is Nick Bennett. He's been a big inspiration for me, another friend that I've made who haven't met in person yet, but one of these days I will make it to Boston and have a beer with him. But just even looking at how he helped me think about personal branding, he's a great marketer. Just provides a ton of value to people as well, and I know he's also very active in podcasting and video series and things like that. So, Um, I think he'd be an easy one to have on and would be phenomenal for your audience. Yeah, no, I love that, because I've definitely seen Nick Bennett all over my feed. Yeah, and he brushes it. Yeah, will definitely we reach out to to...

Nikosole. But thank you so much, Ryan, for spending your Friday afternoon with me and the growth working camp community on behalf of all of us. Welcome to the community. I told you once year along working camp, you can't get rid of us. We'll continue to share out, and so to our listeners, we're going to be sharing out Ryan's profile and this episode very, very soon. But thank you so much for joining us. Yeah, thanks, JAS, it was an absolute honor and a pleasure. I really appreciate it. Thanks for listening to growth marketing camp. If you enjoyed this episode, we'd love it if you would give it a quick five star rating or share it with a friend or colleague looking to strengthen their skills with tips and inspiration. I want to learn more about the company behind the show. Head to open sense dot com. That's O P E N S E N S E dot Com. We'll catch you on the next episode.

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